dondigitalia

Members
  • Content count

    926
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by dondigitalia

  1. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

    I haven't seen Big Fish, but my roommate just got it on DVD, so I'll be adding my rating to that one soon!
  2. The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

    This is my favorite movie ever! I gave it a 10. Tim Burton's movies are always visually stunning, and Danny Elfman's (I've been a fan of his since he was the lead singer of Oingo Boingo in the 80s) music is fantastic.
  3. Envy

    I'd like to submit "Envy" for rating.
  4. I'd like to submit "The Nightmare Before Christmas" to be rated.
  5. Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

    I'll have to agree. I thought the whole deal with Polly Perkins' running out of film was a little predictable and corny, and the characters could have been fleshed out a lot more, but I still found it very entertaining. I gave it a 7.
  6. Consciousness and the Brain

    Ditto. The process of "thinking" is completely separate from the physical actions performed by the brain which make that process possible. By "completely separate" I don't mean to assert that thought can occur without the physical functioning of the brain - I mean that we can mentally isolate one from the other and consider each separately. P.S. Betsy, your definitions are much more clear than the one's I suggested (not surprising, considering how much more practice you've had ).
  7. :Chuckle:

    I just handed a coworder a copy of _The Voice of Reason_, so she could read Dr. Peikoff's essay, "The American School: Why Johnny Can't Think," and what comes on the radio? "We Don't Need No Education" by Pink Floyd What perfect timing!
  8. Characterizing Entities

    In what way are "thinking" and "focusing" physical? Or do you not consider them actions?
  9. Characterizing Entities

    I disagree with including "physical" and "self-generated" in the definitions. Not all actions are physical in nature. Take concepts of consciousness, for example. Thought and focus (in the verbal sense) are definitely not physical. A boulder rolling down a hill is not a self-generated action; it must be generated by the action of some other entity, i.e. I pushed the boulder, which caused it to roll down the hill.
  10. Characterizing Entities

    Action: a state or process by which an entity changes or causes a change in another entity or relationship Relationship: a particular type of condition or connection between entities which describes how they relate to one another Perhaps I shouldn't use the term "relate" in my definition of relationship, but it's the best I could come up with. I'm generally not a big fan of dictionary definitions themselves, but I do find it helpful sometimes to consult a dictionary to point me in the right direction when forming my own. The definitions provided for both of these terms at dictionary.com helped me arrive at these.
  11. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (1999)

    Law & Order bores me to tears. It could be because I once had a roommate who tried to watch it all 7 of the times it was shown daily in syndication on various channels. That much of any TV show is enough to turn someone off.
  12. Carnivàle (2003)

    This one's my personal favorite. It's actually the one and only show I watch regularly. I'm curious to see what other Objectivists have to say about it, because there is a strong supernatural element. I generally don't have a problem with supernatural elements in books, movies, or TV, as long as they are natural within the context of the work itself, meaning the special powers or what-have-you posses a definite identity and are governed by their own set of specific rules. Carnivale is filled with all kinds of intrigue; I'm always wondering, "What's going to happen with such-and-such..." or "What's so-and-so character really after?" Another great thing is that the big-baddie takes the form of a Christian preacher who is basically Evil incarnate.
  13. Carnivale

    This one's my personal favorite. It's actually the one and only show I watch regularly. I'm curious to see what other Objectivists have to say about it, because there is a strong supernatural element. I generally don't have a problem with supernatural elements in books, movies, or TV, as long as they are natural within the context of the work itself, meaning the special powers or what-have-you posses a definite identity and are governed by their own set of specific rules. Carnivale is filled with all kinds of intrigue; I'm always wondering, "What's going to happen with such-and-such..." or "What's so-and-so character really after?" Another great thing is that the big-baddie takes the form of a Christian preacher who is basically Evil incarnate.
  14. I'm moving to San Francisco in June to attend school and would love to take part in a local Objectivists' group. I've tried a few google searches, but wasn't able to find anything (not surprising, given the prominance of the Left throughout CA, particularly in San Francisco). Are any of you from the Bay Area, or do you know of any Objectivist groups in or around San Francisco?
  15. San Francisco Objectivist Groups

    My concentration is in Astrophysics, so it should be pretty exciting. Are you familiar with any of the faculty there? If you have any specific professors to recommend, I'd love to hear them. If not, then I'll figure it out.
  16. Who are your favorite painters, and why?

    I said almost the exact same thing to a friend of mine just a couple of days ago.
  17. Who are your favorite painters, and why?

    I'm also a huge fan of Denys. I've always had a big response to music and literature, but visual arts have tended to leave me hanging. All of that changed when I first viewed Denys' work. "Weight of the World: Atlas in a New Age" brought tears to my eyes. Some other favorites are "Gold Standard" and "An Awakening Mind," which you listed.
  18. Your Avatar

    I chose mine because I love giraffes. They stand taller than the other animals, and use their height as a means of getting to food other animals can't reach. "Height" is symbolic of many things in different contexts - it can be a symbol of self-esteem, physical prowess and mental ability, all of which are fantastic things to admire. I'm developing quite an extensive collection of giraffes. I have some Russian nesting dolls with giraffes painted on them, a number of giraffe figurines, a couple of giraffe paintings on my wall, a wooden decorative mask in the shape of a giraffe's head. The list goes on and on. Oh, and giraffes don't make any audible sound. I always think about them when I want to tell somebody to shut the hell up.
  19. San Francisco Objectivist Groups

    Thanks for the info on Berkeley's club, Stephen. I'll be studying Physics at SFSU, but am hoping to transfer to Berkeley after I have been in California for two years have resident status.
  20. Moral Dilemma #3

    I've observed a number of things, here and on OO.net, that indicate the Speichers are fantastic parents. Hats off to the two of you in giving great advice!
  21. Being Alone

    I'll add that I've found a low number of right friends far preferable to a large number of the wrong ones. In other words: Where friendship is concerned, quality > quantity.
  22. Being Alone

    I'll second all of that. I recently had a struggle with loneliness myself. For several years, I had a slough of superficial friendships that weren't really based on anything. I surrounded myself with a bunch of people who didn't know what they wanted out of life, had no real values, and, quite frankly, didn't have much going on upstairs. During that time, I wasn't really lonely, but was left unfullfilled by my "friends." I ended up giving most of them "the axe," which left me in a different predicament: I was lonely. (It may be that my previous unfulfillment was actually a form of loneliness, which was left unidentified.) Today, I can count the people I call true friends on one hand; there are exactly two. Neither are Objectivists, and there are certainly many things I would do differently if I were making decisions in their place. I've already written about my #1 friend in the "In Praise of" forum. The other is a no-holds-barred socialist. Our views are opposed to each other on almost every philosophical issue, but we're still friends. Why? For exactly the reasons Stephen talked about. She's generally a delight to be around, we laugh at the same jokes, we argue intelligently with each other, and she doesn't take it to heart when I jokingly call her "commie scum." The point of all of that is that it's not necessary for a person to share ALL of your values for you to be friends, or even MOST of them, as Betsy pointed out earlier. What's important is that you share at least some common values, and that you value each other.
  23. Moral Dilemma #3

    I was spanked as a child, and my experience was almost identical to Currence's. I was so afriad of my father that I wouldn't even go to him when I recognized my own mistake and needed advice/help. I'm not a parent, so I haven't really sat down to explore other alternatives for discipline, but the suggestions presented here seem pretty good. A parent who has to resort to physical violence to keep their child in line has failed, in more ways than one. I don't speak to my father at all now. Not really because of the spanking, but because of the aspects of his character (consistent throughout) that gave rise to that method of parenting.
  24. In Praise of a Friend

    I recently posted this to my blog. It's about my own best friend, but I think it illustrates the way many of us feel about those we keep close to our hearts. Even if you don't currently feel this way about anyone in your life, a true friend is a tremendous value - one so great I wanted to share it. On Courtney Lots of people come in and out of our lives over the years. The ones close to you can the brick and mortar out of which your life is built. I don’t mean that you have no life beyond those people. What I mean is that they have such a profound impact on you that you wouldn’t be the same person without having known them. If you choose wisely, the people in your life will aid you in becoming all that you should be. Choosing unwisely can have the opposite effect. The best and most important choice I ever made was becoming friends with Courtney. It’s been a decade, and not much remains of the person I was when we first met. All of the changes have been in the right direction. I can’t even begin to imagine where I’d be without having known her. I don’t think I even care to try; that road was the road home, somewhere I’d never been. She has enriched my life in so many ways I can’t even begin to list them all here. I doubt I’ve even identified them all myself. The point is that I recognize that she has enriched my life. And I’m grateful. We don’t always agree. I don’t always approve of her actions. And I rarely understand her reasoning or believe any reasoning has occurred at all. These things are irrelevant when viewed against the backdrop of energy that fills any room when she’s present. It was from her that I learned life is to be enjoyed, not lamented. She leads by example. It was she who taught me the importance of value, although it was some years before I was able to identify the lesson. The intensity of her values is unparalleled – from her almost psychotic obsession with the color pink, to the frenzy of enjoyment she finds in music, to the unique style her brother calls “MTV chic,” to her entrepreneurial spirit, to her unbridled libido, which I’ve only heard of second-hand. All signs point to one thing – she is the rarest of creatures: A person in love with her own life. In today’s world, a person’s own happiness is supposed to take a back seat to whatever is best for everyone as a whole. She thrives in spite of this perversion, an accomplishment that is nothing short of heroic. In regard to what this has meant to me, the only thing I can tell her is: I learned it from watching you. I’ll be leaving in a couple of months, but it’ll be a comfort to know that no matter where I am, I have a Friend. That’s not a label I hand out indiscriminately, particularly with the capital “F.” It means something: the world.