Arnold

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Everything posted by Arnold

  1. Moral Dilemma #1

    The context is that the company INTENDS selling a product for you to use. You intend paying them. They make mistakes in carrying out their billings. There is no need to wait for them to get their act together. Pay them when they send the bill. Why deprive yourself in the meantime? Why suffer for their mistakes when you can make amends later? There is only so far I would go to help an incompetent business rectify it's problems. I would set aside the money and keep watching. If the cable company failed to deliver, you would adjust the bill accordingly, not seek remuneration for your pains As for Gucci, the appropriate example would be that you bought the shoes, and they failed to bill you. Would you stop wearing them?
  2. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    After touring some European museums, I was bowled over by dark religious works, and on regaining my feet, ran out into the open crying out for Norman Rockwell. I guess I haven't recovered yet.
  3. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    Yes of course we experience the world through our senses, as well as on the perceptual and conceptual levels. How we feel about it is emotional. The desire to live comes from our nature; it is inbuilt. I meant to say that one cannot deduce a reason to live from morality, because morality assumes the desire. About communicating the ideal man, in your case I think she did arouse in you the emotions she had about him. I don't remember implying that every person would respond the same way. Nevertheless I believe an artist tries to strike a resonating emotional response in those who encounter his work. They use different means to achieve this. By the way, I have done sketches myself, in order to put into concrete form my emotions, thus both express and experience them via that means.
  4. Moral Dilemma #1

    Well he is sacrificing his interest to pay for anothers mistakes. Half of a very old book is written about that theme. The error comes from putting anothers interest above his own, and regarding that as a virtue. It is not a virtue to suffer for the errors of others.
  5. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    You are saying that the example painting I used should not be judged only on the fact that I don't like it's view of life. I tried to get around that by saying that I could understand the Vatican considering it great art. So, yes, I do find it difficult to consider what I call "sick" paintings good art. I will give them credit for execution, and I understand that the subject will not conflict with the view of some others; to them it meets the requirements of reflecting their sense of life. In short, ask me if I think the theme is objectively good (expresses rationality for example) and I can answer. The execution can also be objectively judged, but don't ask me to lump the two qualities together in a package deal and come up with a evaluation. I can't do it. (Not unless subject and execution are in harmony) If you ask me to judge solely on technique and style, I could indeed say "well done" of a painting I hate. I have a feeling I still haven't answered you.
  6. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    I wouldn't like that example on my wall, so that is one opinion. However, if asked about the technique, it may be by a master. So my answer is that I judge by two parameters at least (I may yet learn of more). The first is the subject; does it make me feel expressed? Is this how I see life? The second is technique, which is judged by different standards. Thus if I see a JC on the cross, painted by a Vermeer quality artist, I say: Nice technique, yucky subject. I don't like it, but that is judging the subject only. For me it cannot be great art, otherwise I would want it on my wall. I can see how the Vatican would consider it great art, but then again, I don't think much of the Vatican. I hope that answers your question.
  7. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    All of which I agree with. Let me see if an example can meld the differences. Someone says "What do you get out of baseball?" The player, rather than responding with words, picks up a brush and paints a batter, feet firmly planted, bat swung back, a look of of determined concentration on the face. The picture is like a heroic knight swinging a sword. "So that is how you feel" is the response. AR wants to get across her emotions about her intellectual view of man. She picks up a pen and writes the Fountainhead. My response is (because of a similar view) "I see how you feel, I feel it too". Some, who had never had the intellectual understanding, may catch the emotion, and THEN decide to uncover what made them feel the way they did. The answer lies in the intellectual aspects of the book. Has this not happened to many? They read the Fountainhead, and as a wet sponge absorb the emotion, but then put in the effort to find the source of their feelings. Regardless of complexity or origin, we experience the world in emotional coinage. We are not computers who run only on logic. Our desire to live is not logically based, it is emotional. It is why Galt would not care to live without Dagny. There would be no JOY in life. If we want to live, it is logical to embrace Objectivism. If we don't feel like living, Objectivism serves no purpose.
  8. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    Thank you for that Stephen. You know me a little better from HPO days, and so have better understood my message. Of course a sense of life is not just a fleeting emotion; it is the distilled essence of a lifetime of accepted values. I'm not afraid of emotion, but some I believe, are terrified of being called subjectivists or hedonists if they go near such admissions. My rule is to enjoy your emotions, and the best way to do that is to be rational. A rational person, by definition, is avoiding conflict with reality to the best of his ability. Art, music and literature can move me to tears, and that is when I say that the artist has conveyed his feelings in a non verbal way. He indicates that he sees life like I do (in the limited moment at least). Much joy comes from knowing it is a shared value. Because art comprises more than technique, judging it involves more than technique; it involves a philosophical standard, and that is a whole subject.
  9. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    I'm at a loss to see how you can "regain a general state of mind" and claim that this doesn't involve emotion. Emotions are what give us reason to live. You have to FEEL like living. Emotions motivate us and reward us. They *are* our sense of life. I'm beginning to sense that some think there is an intrinsic value to art. Value without a valuer. Both a person and art are involved in coming to a conclusion regarding value. My emotional response to a picture of a bleeding heart JC is negative to put it politely, because it's irrational, not because it's bad art (unless one maintains that anything irrational is automatically bad art). The technique may be wonderful. If one wants to include the choice of subject painted, I would say; "Nice painting, yucky subject". I don't like it, it gives me negative emotions. The artist has failed to reach me, although the religious school down the street loves it. It makes them feel good. I have read TRM, although some time ago. However, I am putting forward my views, not simply reflecting what I read. My point is that you appreciate art through your emotions. Here is an example: A mystic writes music that reflects his awe of his God. I hear this music without knowing anything of it's creation. In my mind I see eagles soaring on the wind when I hear it. Question: has he conveyed his emotion to me? Yes, he was expressing a sense of wonder that I picked up. My judgement on learning his motives is: "Nice music, yucky subject".
  10. I Don't Believe in God

    Still not sure about what I'm doing, but how about this?
  11. The Aesthetic Qualifier

    I have clarified my post in a response to Toyd Loki. I should not have used the word "definition". As for your second last comment, I can make no sense of it. I cannot comprehend anyone engaging in something to make themselves "feel lousy". Your examples don't convey that, only that they find some comfort in listening to music that "knows" how they feel. I do agree with your final sentence though. Those with a black view of existence will feel at home with art that reflects their view. I will have to give the thought about the 'subjective' side some more time. In the effort to be objective, we may be ignoring that the 'subject' is an objective fact that is part of the equation.
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  13. The Aesthetic Qualifier

  14. Your Avatar

    Flying was my career and is my hobby. The picture is of one of my models taken in 1972. My dear friend had a similar model, and we flew together. I last flew it a year ago, but it has so many memories for me, I have relegated it to "family heirloom" rather than risk flying it again. Would you have guessed that?
  15. Vitamins, what is needed and why

    Your position seems much like that of Covert Bailey, who did the TV series "Fit or Fat". He was the first expert who ever made sense of nutrition to me, with his explanations. To me, it is common sense to keep a balance with food intake. Bailey did wonderful humorous antics as he likened fat to big logs, and sugar to kindling. No kindling, no fire to burn the logs. One example was of a woman putting on weight despite long runs daily. He explained that she was using up her kindling, and thus was exercising too much. By resting, her glucose levels would rise enough to start burning fat again. What a great series that was, with a whole auditorium of laughing fans.
  16. Have Gun - Will Travel (1957)

    I have recently obtained a DVD set of a show that I have not seen in decades. It is the first 39 episodes shown in the late fifties. For those who are too young to remember, Paladin is a business man, who lives in the Carlton Hotel in San Francisco. He has a reserved seat at the opera, and is well versed in classic literature. His business card reads; Have Gun, Will Travel. This gun for hire, dressed in black, is a man of the mind, who lives by his moral standards, and will switch sides if his values require it. These half hour shows, compressed their plots into about 22 minutes of run time very well. The delight in seeing a show where a man operates with such moral certainty awaits those who intend obtaining a copy of this first season. When the second season becomes available, I won't hesitate to chase it down.
  17. Paladin

    I have recently obtained a DVD set of a show that I have not seen in decades. It is the first 39 episodes shown in the late fifties. For those who are too young to remember, Paladin is a business man, who lives in the Carlton Hotel in San Francisco. He has a reserved seat at the opera, and is well versed in classic literature. His business card reads; Have Gun, Will Travel. This gun for hire, dressed in black, is a man of the mind, who lives by his moral standards, and will switch sides if his values require it. These half hour shows, compressed their plots into about 22 minutes of run time very well. The delight in seeing a show where a man operates with such moral certainty awaits those who intend obtaining a copy of this first season. When the second season becomes available, I won't hesitate to chase it down.
  18. Being Alone

    Thank you Stephen and Elizabeth, for your kind thoughts. After 35 years of shared friendship, laughter and ambitions, a big chunk of my world will disappear. Life really is a series of transitions, our earlier configurations pass away and and we are reborn into a changed world. Arnold
  19. Being Alone

    Regarding friendships, I discovered something when I revisited the country I grew up in. I had left at 19, and returned some seven years later. The friends I had shared so much with, seemed distant in interest and remembrance of old times. After some thought, I realized what had happened. In my youth, friendship was based common interest, but on a concrete level. Now, when I returned, we could not share the physical activities, and were left with common sense of life values to draw us together. It was this which was missing, and I realized how little I had in common with them after all. Later in life, I met a friend who not only shared the concrete interests, but the philosophical values I had. He has been closer than a brother, and our trust extended to access of each others bank accounts in case of accident. We even shared our careers (He too was an airline captain). I am now preparing to visit him in Canada, perhaps for the last time, as he has advanced liver cancer. Regardless of what happens, I am indeed fortunate to have has a true friend in every way. Anyone who can add friendship like this to a romantic relationship (which this certainly is not), will have much to be happy about. Arnold