Kitty Hawk

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Everything posted by Kitty Hawk

  1. POV

    Did Ayn Rand ever discuss POV in fiction writing? Most older literature used Third Person Omniscient, whereas most modern literature uses either Third Person Single POV or Third Person Multiple POV, meaning you only get one character's POV per scene. No "head hopping" in a single scene. I read a brief analysis of Atlas Shrugged's POV, (unfortunately, I can't figure out how to post a link here, I can't even copy and paste here) which says it was written in Third Person Omniscient, although most scenes are still written from a single character's POV. I'd still like to know what, if anything, Ayn Rand had to say about POV. Or perhaps Shoshana Milgram covered this in one of her lectures?
  2. Les Misérables (2012)

    I have not seen the movie, but I just recently watched the 25th anniversary concert of the musical version, after hearing people praise it for many years. I did not like it. I think it emphasized the worst aspects of Hugo's novel, the altruism and collectivism,and the conventional love story, and did so at the expense of the best parts of Hugo's novel, the heroism of Valjean, and the value conflict between him and Javert. It was there, yes, but it was drowned in a sea of altruism. Valjean's only purpose in the musical seemed to be to sacrifice himself to whoever needed a sacrifice. One of the signature songs of the show is "Look Down" - which has no other meaning than "You are your brother's keeper." Enjolras and his men sounded more like the Occupy Wall Street crowd than men fighting for positive values. Our little lives mean nothing, we'll take those rich men down! Most offensive of all was the bouncy, Gilbert and Sullivanesque songs and music given to the Thenardiers, every time they appeared on the stage. The audience gleefully joined in with their debauchery each time, as they are evidently expected to do. The Thenardiers are made into comic relief. In Hugo's novel, they were not comic relief: they were evil. I also did not hear any really great music. Nothing, in the way of love songs, as beautiful as They Were You from the Fantastiks, or Till There Was You, from The Music Man. Nothing even close to that. To me, it barely rose above recitative anywhere. Nor was there anything as powerfully moving as The Impossible Dream, or as benevolently happy as Oklahoma! And I haven't even mentioned all the vulgarity they added, that was not in Hugo. It was deliberately adding feet of clay to giants, lest we could not relate to such "unrealistic" characters. To sum up, I think there was far to much of Marius and Cosette, and the Thenardiers, and far to little of Valjean and Javert.
  3. Happy Birthday to Kitty Hawk

    Kamsahamnida!
  4. Happy Birthday to Kitty Hawk

    Thanks, guys. Facebook seems to have kept me away from here a lot, but I still come back on occasion. A great place to visit, full of rational friends.
  5. Obscure Victor Hugo

    Just in case you didn't know, "By Order of the King" is the same novel as "The Man Who Laughs," they just gave it a different title, as they do with "Notre Dame de Paris," changing it to "The Hunchback of Notre Dame." Several of his plays have variant titles also, making it difficult to know sometimes if you have a complete collection. "Hans of Iceland," is excellent, and when you read it you will run across some familiar names, such as "Ragnar" and "Daneskiold." Another obscure, but excellent, novel by Hugo is "Bug Jargal," set in the Carribean island of St. Domingo.
  6. Blue Öyster Cult

    I'm certainly familiar with them. Your post brings to mind their song ."Sir Rastus Bear who'd ever believe You'd be by a song redeemed."
  7. Beethoven Virus (2009)

    Hmm, well, there were the occasional funny moments, but it certainly isn't a Romantic Comedy. DramaFever has it listed under "Melodrama," which is their catch-all for whatever isn't a sageuk (historical) or a romantic comedy. Really, I don't remember much humor in it at all, although it has been a while since I watched it. And that's not a complaint - one thing I've never liked, and that is comic relief in a drama that is supposed to be serious.
  8. Dae Jang Geum (2003-2005)

    The other drama by the writer of Dae Jang Geum available at DramaFever is Queen Seon Duk. I didn't like it nearly as much as DJG, though. It was more about politics, but it still has lots of good value conflicts and a good plot. Another drama by the same wrtier and producer is Sodongyo, which is quite good. It's about a scientist/inventor and his struggles. Another great plot with strong value conflicts. Two that I want to see, but which aren't available on Region 1 dvd's, or on DramaFever, are Hur Jun (also spelled Heo Joon), and Sangdo. Hur Jun is about a male version of Jang Geum, evidently, and is by the same producer, but a different writer. It was from 1999, and was said to have revitalized the historical drama in Korea. The other, Sangdo, is about a merchant, and is also by the same producer. I recently read that Google is having some kind of video on demand service, and it is hosting two Korean dramas: Dae Jang Geum, and Hotelier.
  9. Dae Jang Geum (2003-2005)

    Sorry I haven't answered, it's been a while since I've been here. DramaFever is definitely legal. They have permission to distribute all three main Korean networks. There's another site, called Viikii, that might be legal, since they show commercials with the dramas they have. But I'm not sure about that one. 'people typically say "anjusayo" for "have a seat" today.' Yes, I've heard that also. But they also use something that sounds to me like "ankora." But sometimes k's sound like g's, and r's sound like l's, so I'm not really sure.
  10. Happy Birthday to Vespasiano

    Belated birthday greetings, Vespasiano.
  11. Happy Birthday to Kitty Hawk

    Thank you Vespasiano, Alann, and Ed from OC. Another year over, a new one just begun, as someone once said.
  12. Happy Birthday to Kitty Hawk

    Thanks, Mercury!
  13. Happy Birthday to Kitty Hawk

    Thanks to everyone-Betsy, Rose, John, and B. Royce-for the birthday greetings. Much appreciated!
  14. Buffett's Betrayal

    I've despised him ever since I saw him advocating the Estate Tax, and then he turned around and made sure the government wouldn't decide where his money would go after he dies, by designating it for the Bill Gates altruism fund, or whatever it is called. The Estate Tax is not for the likes of him, but he wants to force it on the rest of us. Can't stand the man.
  15. HAPPY BIRTHDAY BETSY!

    축 생일! According to an online translator, that is Korean for Happy Birthday. From my weak understanding of Hangul, it seems to transliterate as: Chuk sengil!
  16. Chamber Music

    I don't listen to a lot of chamber music. It doesn't seem as inspiring or beautiful as other types of music, such as piano or violin concertos, or symphonies. But there are exceptions. I like Tchaikovsky's Serenade for Strings, and his Souvenir of Florence. Especially the waltz movement of the Serenade for Strings. Can anyone recommend other chamber music along the lines of Tchaikovsky's?
  17. Dae Jang Geum (2003-2005)

    The wedding was in Hawaii, and the article I read said her husband brought his pastor from Chicago. So, I'm guessinng Chicago is the lucky town. They seem to have a sizable Korean population there.
  18. Chamber Music

    It's times like these I wish we could edit our posts. I meant Dvorak, not Dovrak, whoever that is.
  19. Chamber Music

    Thanks for the suggestions. I have a box set of Dovrak's Masterworks (40 cd's), which includes both of the pieces suggested. I'll be listening to both today.
  20. Happy Birthday to alann

    Happy birthday, Alann!
  21. Beethoven Virus (2009)

    Mild Spoilers Beethoven Virus is a Korean Drama that aired in 2008, and consisted of 18 hour-long episodes. It tells the story of an unlikely group of people trying to form an orchestra, and the world-famous conductor they enlisted to help them achieve their goal. There are several interesting aspects to Beethoven Virus. It is a story about the art of leadership, in which a leader, in this case a conductor, molds a less than promising group of individuals into a cohesive and skilled team. In this respect, it has similarites with a favorite Western of mine, Only the Valiant. But the conductor, Maestro Kang, is also pushing these people to "seize the day," to try to achieve their own goals, instead of always sacrificing their own goals to those of everyone else in their life. Listen to him exhorting them, from Episode 4: Later, when a new mayor is elected and orders an unwilling Maestro Kang to celebrate his election with a concert of music of the new mayor's choosing, the Maestro agrees to do it. But what he plays at the concert is not what the mayor was expecting . . . The other main character is a young woman named Du Ru Mi, a violinist whose idea it was to form the orchestra, and to get Maestro Kang as its conductor. She, Maestro Kang, and the young trumpeter/conductor, Kang Gun Woo, form a love triangle. This exposes another aspect of Maestro Kang's personality. He is ruthlessly wedded to his music, and doesn't have time for personal relationships. He even denigrates love as a purely "hormonal" aspect of man's nature. This is where the story lets me down, as if a selfish, rational man has to be some Spock-like character without emotions. In the end, Maestro Kang does undergo some changes to his personality, and the writers soften his image to make it more palatable to the public at large. This reminds me of Ayn Rand's one criticism of Calumet "K", that Bannon is shown being kind to one of his workers in a hospital, simply to make his love interest admire him---as if his magnificent achievements were not reason enough to admire him! The same appplies to Maestro Kang, and the way the writers soften him through the course of the story. But I don't want to make it sound worse than it is. He is still Maestro Kang, brilliant and blunt in his judgments, at the end. In sharp contrast to the Maestro, young Kang Gun Woo wants to be a conductor, but he wants to do it without being mean and blunt with people, but just by being a nice guy as he is in his normal life. This contrasting style is emphasized throughout the story. So, although I have reservations about the story's portrayal of a selfish man, I still recommend this excellent drama. The Beethoven Virus is catching the passion to pursue one's dreams, and make them real. For those of you interested in this new phenomenon of Korean Dramas, who want to investigate it but are not prepared to watch a long, 54 episode drama, like Dae Jang Geum, Beethoven Virus is much more accessible at just 18 episodes. It is available from Amazon, Netflix, and for free online at DramaFever.
  22. Beethoven Virus

    Please add Beethoven Virus for rating and review.
  23. Vera Lynn

    Well, veering off the subject of Vera Lynn, and on to the subject of country, there have been a couple of country songs I liked, although I've never listened to much country music. I really like Clint Black's song A Better Man, and among the old time singers, I liked Roger Miller's King of the Road.
  24. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

    That's pretty much exactly my view of the movie, Rose. I loved the Chow Yun-Fat/Michelle Yeoh story line, and was completely uninterested in the Zhang Ziyi storyline. All the tree-top walking and dart catching stuff is pure silliness, which had nothing to do with the real story. I wish they had left that stuff out. I basically love the movie for two scenes. One with Chow Yun-Fat and Michelle Yeoh seated at a table in a beautiful gazebo-like structure, peacefully drinking tea, discussing their lives, and clearly very content in each other's company. And then the death scene of Chow Yun-Fat, where he finally realizes his mistaken philosophy that led him to repress his love for Michelle Yeoh, and tells her so.
  25. Love stories on film

    That's the description of it from Amazon. I have a hard time describing movies without spoiling them. I would add that Heloise not only rebels against the second class status of women, but against the church itself.