dorkee

Casting for The Anthem?

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First of all, I'm terribly sorry if this the wrong forum. Please move if it's incorrect.

I've been reading The Anthem for the past couple of days and this question just popped up in my head.

If you were to do the casting to the movie version of The Anthem, who would you pick?

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First of all, I'm terribly sorry if this the wrong forum. Please move if it's incorrect.

I've been reading The Anthem for the past couple of days and this question just popped up in my head.

If you were to do the casting to the movie version of The Anthem, who would you pick?

PIXAR, as Miss Rand thought Anthem should be animated.

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Really? Do you know why?

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Really? Do you know why?

I couldn't find the exact argument. However, I'm 99% sure that the idea was that animation would allow the viewer to accept the extreme world of Anthem easier and quicker.

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I don't know who I would cast in a live-action film version, but I've always wanted to see one, and see it done well. Too bad a director of the calibre of Fritz Lang and with the same visual sense is not around. However, maybe Zack Snyder, who directed 300, might be able to pull it off. I think Michael Paxton probably could.

Whatever the case, I think there would be a challenge to making Anthem into a great motion picture (following the standard of cinematic greatness as expressed by Ayn Rand when discussing Fritz Lang's Siegfried in The Romantic Manifesto, pages 62-63 of the Signet Edition): to write the screenplay without the inclusion of any voice-overs, to convey whatever is going on in the protagonist's mind through his facial expressions, his gestures, through dialogue, and in the visual context of any particular scene. There have been some great voice-overs in movie history (such as the narration in The Shawshank Redemption and in Chocolat), but, ultimately, I don't think voice-overs really belong in dramatic films (only documentaries). A voice-over in a movie is like a narrator on the stage, to me; it destroys the illusion that what you're seeing is real. Also, every shot of a movie should feel as if you are standing right there, seeing and hearing everything (except those things that are best left to the imagination, such as in the coffee scene in The Big Heat, and the scene in The Verdict where Jack Warden has bad news for Paul Newman, and we don't hear what he says, but we know what he's saying). A voice-over in a movie is, essentially, a short-cut to conveying information to the audience. So when Equality 7-2521 discovers the word "I" in an ancient text, it is appropriate for the genius of Ayn Rand to convey that discovery through first-person narration in the novel, but the challenge in a motion picture is to convey that discovery through the expression on the actor's face, through the film's music (or absence of music in that scene; no music might be more moving and powerful) and through the change in language in the subsequent dialogue between him and Liberty 5-3000: "I love you", instead of "We love you."

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Really? Do you know why?

I couldn't find the exact argument. However, I'm 99% sure that the idea was that animation would allow the viewer to accept the extreme world of Anthem easier and quicker.

The place where they made new babies would probably have to be edited out I think.

Unless they turn it into a mature cartoon where and show it stylised with narration from the diary.

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