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Is now a good time for the Atlas Shrugged movie?

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Hollywood could soon be going Objectivist.

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A number of stars have expressed serious interest in playing the lead role of Taggart. Angelina Jolie previously had been reported as a candidate to play the strong female character, but the list is growing and now includes Charlize Theron, Julia Roberts and Anne Hathaway.

Although it was written a half-century ago, producers say that the book’s themes of individualism resonate in the era of Obama, government bailouts and stimulus packages -- making this the perfect moment to bring the 1,100-page novel to the big screen.

“This couldn’t be more timely,” said Karen Baldwin, who along with husband Howard is producing, with film industry consultant John Logigian advising on the project. “It’s uncanny what Rand was able to predict — about the only things she didn’t anticipate are cell phones and the Internet.” Baldwin may be on to something -- love it or hate it, "Shrugged" is seeing a resurgence, with book sales spiking as debates rage in Washington and around the country about the government's role in a faltering free-market economy.

Hollywood may have its first anti-bailout movie

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Enough talk from these people. How many scripts have been written and come to nothing? I will believe it when the money is paid, and the cameras are rolling. No more living in false hope for this little black duck.

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Well, maybe AS will be scrubbed again. Nevertheless, in the meantime, maybe someone could work on a new film version of We the Living or a first film version of Anthem (as I mentioned in another thread, Zack Snyder, director of 300, might be able to do it). And Ayn Rand's plays could be filmed.

While we are waiting for AS to come to theaters, other Ayn Rand works can still be brought to the screen.

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Speaking of We the Living... I've always thought that We the Living would make a perfect opera. It has all the elements. The story is compact enough to be turned into a libretto and the drama is perfect for grand opera music. Too bad we don't have any composers these days that could do it justice.

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I would love to see a well made movie of the novel, but the last I heard about it was that Angenlina Jolie was set to play Dagny! Yuck. I hope they get someone else before they make it. She's just too fluffy for that role, in my opinion.

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Hollywood could soon be going Objectivist.

--------------

A number of stars have expressed serious interest in playing the lead role of Taggart. Angelina Jolie previously had been reported as a candidate to play the strong female character, but the list is growing and now includes Charlize Theron, Julia Roberts and Anne Hathaway.

.

Hollywood may have its first anti-bailout movie

Silly me, I didn't read before I posted. Charlize Theron would be a better pick. Anne Hathaway might be able to pull it off.

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Ed Cline's latest essay over at http://ruleofreason.blogspot.com/ , "From the Academy to Atlas Shrugged," has a link to an article about renewed interest in filming Atlas:

http://www.riskybusinessblog.com/2009/03/w...lout-movie.html

The article is a mixed bag, and bizarrely includes a mug shot of one of Congress's most depraved looters. The writer doesn't understand much. But there is encouraging talk:

After decades in development hell, Ayn Rand’s capitalism-minded “Atlas Shrugged” is taking new steps toward the big screen — with one of the film world’s most prominent money men potentially at its center.

Ryan Kavanaugh’s Relativity Media is circling the Baldwin Entertainment project and could come aboard to finance with Lionsgate, which got involved several years ago....

The project would likely land in the $50 million-budget range but could go higher depending on talent.

Producers are looking to shoot next year, driven in part by the timeliness, as well as by a clause in the option. A high net-worth individual with whom the Baldwins have partnered controls the option, but that option would revert to the Rand estate if production doesn't begin by the end of 2010....

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A number of stars have expressed serious interest in playing the lead role of Taggart. Angelina Jolie previously had been reported as a candidate to play the strong female character, but the list is growing and now includes Charlize Theron, Julia Roberts and Anne Hathaway.

It looks like Charlize Theron -- my choice -- and a MINISERIES.

YES!!

Charlize Theron Gives Strength to Atlas Shrugged

Published July 21, 2009 in Casting Update

Sometimes a book is just too big to capture in a single movie. One such example is Atlas Shrugged, which has seen live-action features repeatedly attempted. Though the cause felt lost, Charlize Theron has come aboard to give the adaptation some much needed momentum.

There is, however, a catch.

Charlize Theron Pushing Atlas Shrugged

If you can't turn a book into a single film, sometimes you need two. Or, better yet in the case of Atlas Shrugged, you need an entire miniseries.

Charlize Theron has been meeting with Lionsgate and producers Howard and Karen Baldwin about taking the title role of Dagny Taggart. Her only concern is adapting the story properly. To solve this problem, Lionsgate will turn the story into a miniseries for Epix, a pay-cable network Lionsgate is forming with MGM and Viacom/Paramount.

A single feature film is still possible but, for the most part, most attention will currently be given to create a series that is capable of bringing in network subscribers.

Not that the production needs any more bumps in the road, but it might all come down to Theron's involvement; and she's on the fence. As of recent, the actress will not confirm if she'll be hanging around with Shrugged to see it enter any sort of production. More official announcements should be coming shortly.

(link)

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She's oh so easy on the eyes and a very good actress. Fingers crossed...

Also, a mini-series is the only way to properly put the novel on screen.

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She's oh so easy on the eyes and a very good actress. Fingers crossed...

Also, a mini-series is the only way to properly put the novel on screen.

Acutally, Chalize Theron has a terrible philosophy of life. I once read an article where she was interviewed and she had some of the worst responses. She struggled quite a bit to get to where she is at now, and then she must have lost her mind.

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Here's additional information from a more authoritative source -- Steven Zeitchik of the Hollywood Reporter.

'Atlas' may no longer be shrugging

By Steven Zeitchik

The 37-year effort to bring "Atlas Shrugged" to the screen is finally gaining momentum.

Sort of.

Oscar winner Charlize Theron has been meeting during the past several months with Lionsgate and producers Howard and Karen Baldwin, who are developing the project's latest iteration, about starring as main character Dagny Taggart.

Theron has been eager to play the role but has been concerned that a feature would lose many of the nuances of the monster-sized novel. So the Rand adaptation would, under a plan she and producers discussed, be turned into a miniseries for Epix, the pay-cable network Lionsgate is forming with MGM and Viacom/Paramount.

The project, according to this plan, would be to make the mini one of the fledgling network’s programming linchpins. While insiders are not ruling out the possibility of releasing a condensed version to theaters, the main thrust would be the network, where the mini could be used to lure the book’s legion of fans to subscribe.

(Link to entire article)

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She's oh so easy on the eyes and a very good actress. Fingers crossed...

Also, a mini-series is the only way to properly put the novel on screen.

Acutally, Chalize Theron has a terrible philosophy of life. I once read an article where she was interviewed and she had some of the worst responses. She struggled quite a bit to get to where she is at now, and then she must have lost her mind.

Yes, I seem to have a very negative impression lodges in my memory. Her views were very far from the thrust of this movie, so what is motivating her?

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People have been promising an Atlas Shrugged movie for over 30 years now! It's a complete and utter joke. There should have been FIVE Hollywood and THREE television versions by now!!! Plus innumerable stage plays, radio plays, comic books, Saturday cartoons, etc. Someone really really (really really) dropped the ball here. :angry2:

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People have been promising an Atlas Shrugged movie for over 30 years now! It's a complete and utter joke. There should have been FIVE Hollywood and THREE television versions by now!!! Plus innumerable stage plays, radio plays, comic books, Saturday cartoons, etc. Someone really really (really really) dropped the ball here. :angry2:

I do not know who might have "dropped the ball," but I am fine with it never being made if the main theme has to be compromised. I would rather read it over and over to myself and invision the characters in my own mind than let some half-wit put together a terrible movie, play or something else.

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People have been promising an Atlas Shrugged movie for over 30 years now! It's a complete and utter joke. There should have been FIVE Hollywood and THREE television versions by now!!! Plus innumerable stage plays, radio plays, comic books, Saturday cartoons, etc. Someone really really (really really) dropped the ball here. :angry2:

Considering the intellectual landscape right now is a desert, I'm surprised anyone in showbiz would want to touch a 1,000 page novel based on a philosophical theme with a ten-foot pole. Even assuming we lived in a nation of Objectivists, condensing Miss Rand's genius literary monolith into a two-hour film that could yield a profit without compromising the integrity of the story would require Hank Rearden's counterpart in the film-industry. I really, really hope it could happen, but I'm not holding my breath, and I'm a little scared of the result if it were to happen.

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I would rather read it over and over to myself and invision the characters in my own mind than let some half-wit put together a terrible movie, play or something else.

Or worse yet, have to overcome the hurdle of blocking out the conception of the characters as depicted horribly in the movie when you are having to read the book for the first time.

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In Chapter 12 of Essays on Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged by Robert Mayhew (I just finished reading it a few minutes ago), Jeff Britting presents an excellent essay on "Adapting Atlas Shrugged to Film." He believes that it is quite doable provided the plot remains intact. He discusses previous attempts to bring it to the screen and TV, as well as Rand's own work on a screenplay. (She had completed ~ 1/3 of the screenplay before she died.) The essential element that needs to be understood by the director and the screenwriter is that the ideas need to be dramatized by the action of the characters and the events of the story. It is the concrete events that show the abstract philosophy. "Rather than creating obstacles, a thorough understanding of the novel's plot would clarify the job. But this requires an understanding of the underlying theory of story telling, without which the book is nothing, and any adaptation is less than nothing."

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The owner of any intellectual property is the one ultimately responsible for its use - or dis-use - or mis-use. If you want to know why Atlas Shrugged has never been made into a superlative movie or mini-series, start there.

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The owner of any intellectual property is the one ultimately responsible for its use - or dis-use - or mis-use. If you want to know why Atlas Shrugged has never been made into a superlative movie or mini-series, start there.

I think that the current rights holder (who I've heard talk many times) has made sure that a bad movie hasn't been made. He's found it trying and difficult to have a good movie made and that's why we don't have it. In my view, this is a good thing. The Atlas movie could be a force for tremendous good both in honoring Ayn Rand and as a corrective to today's debased culture. But, if done incorrectly, it could do the opposite on both counts.

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I think that the current rights holder (who I've heard talk many times) has made sure that a bad movie hasn't been made. He's found it trying and difficult to have a good movie made and that's why we don't have it.

Ayn Rand found it trying and difficult to have The Fountainhead movie made almost precisely the way she wanted it but she got it done. There are excellent writers in existence who could use her big headstart on the script as a guide to completing the effort with strict instructions not to add any nonsense to it. The technology of movie-making has also never been better and improves every year. *All* worthy efforts *are* trying and difficult. Was somebody expecting it to be an easy project? The hardest part - by many orders of magnitude - was writing the book itself. The rest would take serious effort but first that effort has to be chosen and the action taken.

Look at the incredible movie renditions of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and then tell me that difficult projects with excellent results are somehow impossible. (And incidentally, a project done in New Zealand outside of conventional Hollywood studios.)

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Look at the incredible movie renditions of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and then tell me that difficult projects with excellent results are somehow impossible. (And incidentally, a project done in New Zealand outside of conventional Hollywood studios.)

LoTR quality translation to film would be a dream come true. But, then, there wasn't a philosophy to contend with in LoTR.

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LoTR quality translation to film would be a dream come true. But, then, there wasn't a philosophy to contend with in LoTR.

It wasn't Objectivism but there were certainly a number of important ideas dealt with in LOTR. At root the story is arguably about ethics and doing the good and relentlessly fighting evil even if it involves great hardship.

A sufficiently good screenwriter does not need to be an Objectivist to accurately translate Atlas into movie form, especially given available guidance from AR's 1/3 started script. Actually, it's an important fact of reality that the great majority of the most competent men in the world including writers are NOT Objectivists. And if they make mistakes, it's the role of the IP owner to make sure they're fixed. That does, of course, involve work and active involvement.

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The owner of any intellectual property is the one ultimately responsible for its use - or dis-use - or mis-use. If you want to know why Atlas Shrugged has never been made into a superlative movie or mini-series, start there.

I imagine Ayn Rand owned the movie rights from 1957 to 1982. If so, she made a terrible mistake. But who's owned them since then? They're in the wrong too.

This whole situation is beyond ridiculous. I look forward to Atlas Shrugged video games and a John Galt action figure at the turn of the century.

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[Lord of the Rings] quality translation to film would be a dream come true. But, then, there wasn't a philosophy to contend with in LoTR.

Run that by me again?#@!!!!

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I imagine Ayn Rand owned the movie rights from 1957 to 1982. If so, she made a terrible mistake. But who's owned them since then? They're in the wrong too.

John Aglioloro has the rights to the movie currently.

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