Betsy Speicher

The Winslow Boy (1999)

Rate this Movie   3 votes

  1. 1. Artistic Merit

    • 10
      1
    • 9
      0
    • 8
      1
    • 7
      1
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0
  2. 2. Sense of Life or Personal Value

    • 10
      2
    • 9
      0
    • 8
      1
    • 7
      0
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

5 posts in this topic

I consider this to be one of the best films EVER! (I'm a little surprised that it hasn't been posted already). The barrister is one of my favorite heroes -- and this is certainly the best role Jeremy Northam ever played. I loved him [as Mr. Knightly] and Gwyneth Paltrow [as Emma] in the 1996 film adaptation of Emma, but his role in The Winslow Boy as Sir Robert Morton was even better.

I love this film more every time I see it, particularly the ending, the full impact of which was impossible for me to process on a first viewing, because I was busy simply trying to process the literal meaning of what the housekeeper was saying.

To get the full effect, subtitles are very helpful, because there is a LOT of excellent dialog, but it is not always easy to catch by hearing only, as the characters sometimes talk over each other.

I know, this is all gush and no information. But a synopsis can't begin to do it justice anyway, IMO. A nice long critical review could, but that would necessarily be loaded with spoilers. If you haven't seen it (and unless someone else is more informative) you'll just have to see it to judge for yourself.

"Let right be done."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't seen this version, but the original version starring Robert Donat was outstanding.

I second that, and since it was recorded closer to the story time, it has an authentic feel to it. Subtle interactions that reflect the attitudes of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The original version came out in 1950, and this one fifty years later. I have viewed my 1950 version many times, but this is the first time I have seen this later version. Some comparisons follow. In general, this version holds up well in that it didn't muck it up as so many remakes do.

One benefit of the new version (NV) is subtitles, and you need them; the speed of talk was too fast. In so many films it seems that actors wait for their turn to 'speak' and rush their words. This is not what happens in normal conversation. The old (OV) version seemed more natural in this regard.

The single biggest difference between versions is in the portrayal of characters. In the NV the importance of the characters is secondary to 'winning the case'. For me, Rattigan's writing was to show how values and character inter-played, and the story was the means to that end. In the NV the characters are nowhere as clearly defined. although I would rate the Lord Morton, Ronnie and the father well done. The brother and in particular the sister parts were lacking by comparison with the OV.

While this is a very good movie, apart from it's technical superiority, I don't think there was much point to remaking it. For me, the original still has an incredible impact missing in the second.

Still, given the fact that the NV is available and is vastly more worthy than most of what is offered these days, I will give it an 8. The OV gets a ten by comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites