Joss Delage

Favorite rousing songs?

45 posts in this topic

All,

I was reading the lyrics of a famous WW2 French song, "Le Chant des Partisans", and I thought it would be interesting to list beautiful, rousing songs. I'll open up with:

- The Star-Spangled Banner -> Hard not to put first here (but hard to sing, I find).

- La Marseillaise -> The French anthem has great musics and lyrics. Check the great 5th and 6th verses on Wikipedia.

- Le Chant des Partisans -> Check the unofficial English translation on Wikipedia. Can you imagine in today's day and age a song that would say:

Come out of the mine, come down from the hills, comrades,

Take the guns, the munitions and the grenades from under the straw;

Ahoy killers, with bullets and knives kill swiftly!

- L'Internationale -> Despite the Socialist origin, I can't help but add that one to the mix... If one can forget the origin, the lyrics and the music are stirring.

What songs would you add to those?

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Drink!

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I have heard magnificent renditions of La Marseillaise. This has to be the most inspiring national anthem, and when fully orchestrated, it leaves one breathless.

Yes, and Drink Drink Drink by Mario Lanza is rousing indeed. Another of my favourites.

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Rousing song? Hmmmm . . . .

Di quella pira from Verdi's Il Trovatore, especially the way Franco Corelli sang it!

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The ending of

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This one always makes me smile. ;)

Very clever! ;)

I like this one from Hoodwinked, as well. Anne Hathaway has such a pleasant, innocent voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baOUKNdB1Lo

That movie was pretty entertaining too!

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How about Jerusalem of Gold written when the Israelis took back the Old City during the '67 war. It is considered the second national anthem of Israel. After two thousand years, Jews got their city back.

Please see and hear this YouTube. Ofra Hazah has a gorgeous voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlIJOAZ1pak...feature=related

It is sung in Hebrew with English subtitles so you can understand the words.

Bob Kolker

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How about Jerusalem of Gold written when the Israelis took back the Old City during the '67 war. It is considered the second national anthem of Israel. After two thousand years, Jews got their city back.

Please see and hear this YouTube. Ofra Hazah has a gorgeous voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlIJOAZ1pak...feature=related

It is sung in Hebrew with English subtitles so you can understand the words.

Bob Kolker

Beautiful singer and song.

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May I add one? No lyrics but I think you'll agree they aren't necessary in order to rouse you.

Whoever has seen the movie probably will agree that this song seems like a natural anthem in the name of human freedom. Every time I hear it I feel like taking off in sprint as fast as I possibly can, finally arriving at the top of a cliff and releasing the loudest yell I am capable of. I picture a mix of sweat and tears running down over me, having accumulated during the run in response to my physical exhaustion and mental considerations of the joys of being human. All of this would be in some way as if I were letting the Earth know I existed and that no object or person can make me fear my responsibility to my own life. It takes quite a while for my goosebumps to subside after hearing this song.

I'd like to add also that I don't often find Irish dancing particularly beautiful. In this case though it strikes me as incredibly graceful. I think everyone will appreciate the video more at 2:25 with the appearance of "the individual" in the dance.

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May I add one? No lyrics but I think you'll agree they aren't necessary in order to rouse you.

"The Last of the Mohicans" is a great movie with a superb soundtrack.

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In another thread some time ago,* I mentioned the instrumental work "Glider, Pt. 1" by Bill Conti, from the soundtrack of The Thomas Crown Affair (1999). To my mind, that is what Halley's 5th Concerto in Atlas Shrugged would sound like if it were made real.

I want my whole life to feel like that piece sounds.

-----

*For some reason, I can't find that thread by searching, so I can't post a link to it without taking longer to find it than I want to.

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This thread got me thinking about one of the experiences I had that I'd like to mention here. Pardon my enthusiasm as I begin raving...

The single most magnificent and awe-inspiring combination of music and film-making I have enjoyed is to be found in my favourite motion picture of all time, Ridley Scott's grand masterpiece: Gladiator. Composed by Hans Zimmer, the soundtrack of this epic made me soar to heights I didn't know existed, and it does so to this day.

The score begins at the prologue of the movie with a soulful hymn for the beloved. It is sung by a gentle female voice, that of Lisa Gerrard. Appearing in moments throughout the film, it serves to underscore the Roman General Maximus' longing for his family, and his thoughts later of joining them in Elysium, the Roman concept of the afterlife. The music here is serene, and yet, heart-wrenching in its subtle implication of what lies in wait for our hero.

Perhaps the scenes that best illustrate Hans Zimmer's rousing passages are those of the opening battle sequence against the tribes of Germania. Immediately uplifting as if a precursor to victory, the sound of the main theme begins to rise with the assembling of the mighty Roman war machine. With the knowledge that the tribes have refused to surrender, our general rides his horsemen into position far behind the unsuspecting enemy barbarians. As he proceeds, the music begins its ascent into a bold, suspenseful tune, signifying to the audience that the enemy's fate has been sealed. The pace of the rhythm picks up as the Roman catapults are loaded, their infantry forming for advance, their archers preparing to shoot. Interspersing the melody with heavy base accents to produce a haunting sense of doom, Zimmer draws the viewer inescapably into the arena of battle.

Maximus' plan to surprise the barbarians from the rear as they fight towards the front is well under way when the music soars into a glorious hymn of exaltation. As his horsemen gallop towards their inevitable victory, the score keeps pace, complementing the thunderous sound of the riders' hooves with its own rhythmical brilliance. Ferocious balls of fire from the catapults light the skies above Germanic heads, and the rain of Roman arrows makes short work of many a tribesman.

I suppose that were you to find yourself on the battlefield fighting against the army of the Roman general Maximus, and you heard the booming cry "Roma Victor!" coming from behind you accompanied by Hans Zimmer's tones of war, you'd have had all of twenty seconds to say your prayers before you stood face to face with your mythological equivalent of St. Peter. Thus it goes for the scattered hordes of Germania, who, engaged on foot with the first wave of Roman infantry, are unpleasantly suprised by the horsemen's ambush from behind.

I must have watched, and listened, to that battlefield sequence well over two dozen times after being reminded by this thread, and, I must say, it looks like it's about to happen again.

As the last enemy soldiers are dispatched and the battle draws to a close, the music transitions into a serene anthem, the voices of pain drowned out by the Roman cries of victory, showing the relief on the emperor Marcus Aurelius' face as he realizes that his great campaign has finally come to an end.

And this is just the BEGINNING!

Rarely do I encounter a feat of film-making that brings forth such an emotion of triumph and glory that its mere memory has me longing to experience it again. It is a drug for the consciousness that no other drug can match! Only one way seems appropriate to pay this work of greatness a lasting homage, and that is the repeated re-watching of selected scenes from Gladiator until I drop from exhaustion.

"Strength and Honour!"

I found one link that captures the best sequences. The soulful hymn is in the first 20 seconds, the suspenseful war music begins at about 2:30, the rousing exaltation at 3:35, the main theme at 5:00 and the last aria at 7:35:

Main theme:

Link

Main theme at 3:20 accompanied by a glorious hailing of the hero:

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

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My previous post on the music of Gladiator got me thinking about other pieces that I really like, so I'm going to mention another one: Apollo 13.

If you remember Ron Howard's Apollo 13, then surely you remember its breathtaking launch scene. I just recently watched the movie again and I couldn't help but marvel at the sounds coming through my headphones around the time the astronauts make their way to the rocket for the launch. The soundtrack I refer to includes the work of none other than the accomplished James Horner.

Mr. Horner's tribute to the heroes behind Apollo 13 -- most certainly the minds that made it possible -- includes a masterful blend of vocal and orchestral music. Employing a slow, regal cadence, Track 9, "All Systems Go", sings a majestic ode to the indomitable spirit that reached for the stars.

When the camera brings into view, and pans over, the rocket on the launch pad (around 1:35 on the track), the heretofore modest music makes a sudden, sweeping movement upward! The first time I heard it my mind was jolted out of its state and, like Apollo, launched high into the zenith; had I been standing then I am not certain I would have kept my balance. I thought of the implacable defiance of a creator's spirit against all of the things that seek to deny it its resolve; that, no matter how many things had once stood in its way, Apollo now stood alone, resolute, unyielding, undeniable.

Experiencing the movie together with its music creates a lasting, wondrous effect that cannot be gotten from the soundtrack alone. Also, I must say, the movie reminded me of Ayn Rand's own observation of the launch of Apollo 11:

Link

Here is the launch music. The overture begins around 1:00, the first rousing sequence around 1:35, and then a second one occurs at 6:05 which is played exactly at lift-off. The voices at 6:55 made me feel like I was floating amongst the stars:

Link

Here is the launch scene if you're interested. I read Miss Rand's essay and tried to imagine what she must have experienced. The movie certainly helps there!

Link

And for some unmistakably American humor:

Get ready for a little jolt, fellas!
That was some little jolt!

All in all, I think this is a very well made, very enjoyable and rousing movie. Sorry if this sounds more like a movie review. When it comes to masterpieces like this, it seems unfair to separate the art into just music or just movement. Certainly, both are rousing on their own here but I think the rousedness was designed to be integrated into the entire work, and rightly so in the case of Apollo 13.

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Thank you, LJH. That was great.

You are most welcome, Brian. Glad you enjoyed it.

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What must Anthem's Prometheus have felt when he at last discovered the motive force behind the greatness of Man, the sanctity of I?

In Howard Shore's A Journey In The Dark from Lord Of The Rings, I found a glimpse of this overwhelming sense of awe, as when having reached a pinnacle, that I am at a loss to describe fully. Such is the climax that each time it is played it demands foremost attention from the listener, and each time I listen I can do nothing else.

Here is the passage. I am referring to the moments from 2:12 to 3:29:

Link

Though the music may have been intended to convey something else in the movie, I consider the brief prelude and its climax a fitting representation of the following quote, a man's realization of being Man:

And now I see the face of god, and I raise this god over the earth, this god whom men have sought since men came into being, this god who will grant them joy and peace and pride.

This god, this one word: "I."

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"The Last of the Mohicans" is a great movie with a superb soundtrack.
Well, we kind of face to the North, and real subtle-like, turn left.

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