Joss Delage

Favorite rousing songs?

45 posts in this topic

The strings' part from the The Right Stuff theme. (See 2:54. We get all of it at 4:08.)

Some of those bits were lifted straight off the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto (not that there is anything wrong with that; after all, Newton said "I am standing on the shoulder of giants"). If you would like to hear that piece, and don't mind slightly shaky sound, this is a great performance, which I am sure you will love if those are the bits that struck you from Conti's score:

And for me, this stands out as THE performance of the piece (only last movement though), and still draws a tear (watch the end to see why):

The end of tyranny. Well, at least so they believed at the time.

Watching this performance, and hearing Perlman's words at the end, even knowing what actually happened to the country since, still give me a tremendous feeling of hope and courage...

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The strings' part from the The Right Stuff theme. (See 2:54. We get all of it at 4:08.)

Some of those bits were lifted straight off the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto (not that there is anything wrong with that; after all, Newton said "I am standing on the shoulder of giants"). If you would like to hear that piece, and don't mind slightly shaky sound, this is a great performance, which I am sure you will love if those are the bits that struck you from Conti's score:

And for me, this stands out as THE performance of the piece (only last movement though), and still draws a tear (watch the end to see why):

The end of tyranny. Well, at least so they believed at the time.

Watching this performance, and hearing Perlman's words at the end, even knowing what actually happened to the country since, still give me a tremendous feeling of hope and courage...

Great last movement from my favorite violin concerto. Thanks.

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And for me, this stands out as THE performance of the piece (only last movement though), and still draws a tear (watch the end to see why):

POWERFUL ending! Thank you. I would certainly love to see more like this if you find them. Perlman is my favourite violinist, and I was thinking of starting a thread about him at some point. However, the composers he plays are certainly geniuses too, not to make light of them.

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What must Anthem's Prometheus have felt when he at last discovered the motive force behind the greatness of Man, the sanctity of I?

In Howard Shore's A Journey In The Dark from Lord Of The Rings, I found a glimpse of this overwhelming sense of awe, as when having reached a pinnacle, that I am at a loss to describe fully. Such is the climax that each time it is played it demands foremost attention from the listener, and each time I listen I can do nothing else.

Here is the passage. I am referring to the moments from 2:12 to 3:29:

Link

Though the music may have been intended to convey something else in the movie, I consider the brief prelude and its climax a fitting representation of the following quote, a man's realization of being Man:

And now I see the face of god, and I raise this god over the earth, this god whom men have sought since men came into being, this god who will grant them joy and peace and pride.

This god, this one word: "I."

Interestingly, it is also my favorite passage in the entire 3-movie score. It sends shivers down my spine - literally. I feel a strong emotion of lost greatness, completely in synch with the passage in the movie.

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Interestingly, it is also my favorite passage in the entire 3-movie score. It sends shivers down my spine - literally. I feel a strong emotion of lost greatness, completely in synch with the passage in the movie.

Do we have the same passage in mind?

Is your emotion caused by the music alone, or because you've integrated it along with the events in the movie? (Such as anticipating demons in the shadows, for instance.)

Consider the notes rising from 2:51 all the way to the bursting climax at 3:00. Do these notes really evoke fear in you? Because I would find that surprising, not just interesting, as you state. When I picture that particular sequence combined with the quote, "... this one word: I", the "I" is pronounced right at the climax. Notice that the keynote of the scale is being sounded here. The effect it produces -- in me, if not anyone else -- is one of a tremendous leap upward, far above anything the protagonist would have known until that point. Then, at 3:08, the keynote is sounded once again, but this time in a manner so as to be immensely powerful because of two things, both expressed simultaneously:

1) Pain: Remember, the music asks the hero, the times when you were oppressed and their injustice knew no bounds?

2) Liberation: Those days are over now, the hero acknowledges. Pain? For a time, but not any longer. A new beginning lies ahead, a rebirth into a new existence that no collectivist mob could ever know. I have embraced that existence. I have made it mine.

That a single chord is held for three seconds to produce such a magnitude of emotion is what I consider a testament to musical brilliance. Melancholy in its recollection of the past, exulting in its solemn promise of the future, I find it to be moving indeed. Unfortunately, the soundtrack does not contain more of such music. When I wrote my post, I was careful to select exactly that part of the passage that leads to and includes the climax. The parts before and after the range I indicated are not representative of a sense of awe to me; they belong within the greater context of the movie, which, if I recall correctly, is supposed to convey a feeling of dread around the time the group of friends enters the cavern (the mines of Moria, I believe).

No, my purpose was to bring to attention the passage completely divorced from the emotion of fear that accompanies it in the visual depiction of the journey. When you listen to the notes as I do you aren't supposed to think of LOTR at all; and if you do, certainly not the ghastliness of the mines.

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Interestingly, it is also my favorite passage in the entire 3-movie score. It sends shivers down my spine - literally. I feel a strong emotion of lost greatness, completely in synch with the passage in the movie.

Do we have the same passage in mind?

Yes, but I can't separate the emotion from the movie. The emotion, by the way, isn't fear. As I said, it is one of sadness over lost greatness. This passage takes place when Gandalf takes the risk of making a little more light to show the Fellowship the majesty and grandeur of the Moria great halls.

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Yes, but I can't separate the emotion from the movie. The emotion, by the way, isn't fear. As I said, it is one of sadness over lost greatness. This passage takes place when Gandalf takes the risk of making a little more light to show the Fellowship the majesty and grandeur of the Moria great halls.

Well, the phrase "shivers down my spine" is something I would associate with fear/foreboding/doom/dread etc. But if, even for a brief moment, you felt a bit of the greatness in "lost greatness", then we have that bit in common.

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Yes, but I can't separate the emotion from the movie. The emotion, by the way, isn't fear. As I said, it is one of sadness over lost greatness. This passage takes place when Gandalf takes the risk of making a little more light to show the Fellowship the majesty and grandeur of the Moria great halls.

Well, the phrase "shivers down my spine" is something I would associate with fear/foreboding/doom/dread etc. But if, even for a brief moment, you felt a bit of the greatness in "lost greatness", then we have that bit in common.

Interesting - I only get it in positive emotional moments, such as Perlman's speech higher up, or after witnessing a truly exceptional performance (e.g. a live recital by Maurizio Pollini).

In times of fear I would use the phrase "blood freezing in veins".

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This

is a version of a peice originally from Sunshine a fantastic movie until it turned into a slasher film is also used in the Kick Ass film during the strobe scene. The piece is by John Murphy called Adagio In D Minor

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This

is a version of a peice originally from Sunshine a fantastic movie until it turned into a slasher film is also used in the Kick Ass film during the strobe scene. The piece is by John Murphy called Adagio In D Minor

Very nice when it picks up the pace, but unfortunately the movie does not do justice to the music, which celebrates achievement, not its destruction.

You are right that the movie started out really well; so promising was it that I thought amidst all the others I'd seen this one would really stand out. Little did I expect that it would stand out in the opposite way, becoming literally anti-life towards the end.

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For those who like metal, Iron Maiden - Wildest Dreams:

One of their simpler songs, but it oozes positivity. From what I've gathered, this isn't typical of metal lyrics but then again, IM are anything but typical.

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A la Volonte du Peuple

Song from the musical "Les Miserables"

The original version in French is best:

Lyrics: http://paroles.abazada.com/chanson,a-la-vo...,10175-1836.htm

The English version is nowhere as good, but the music is still powerful:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6-5g78Nr6Q

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Rouse is defined as to excite to activity, to stir up or to wake from sleep. With those thoughts in mind I offer a different type of a rousing song for those that still love and cherish what America is supposed to stand for.

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Rouse is defined as to excite to activity, to stir up or to wake from sleep. With those thoughts in mind I offer a different type of a rousing song for those that still love and cherish what America is supposed to stand for.

Ray, Bible references aside, I quite like this one too: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBohsCG8emk

But there's things goin' on that make me mad down to the core

I have to work like a dog to make ends meet

There's crooked politicians and crime in the street

And I'm madder than hell and I ain't gonna take it no more

Should have played that bit on Nov. 3.

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In a similar vein, rtg, I offer this one, detailing the UK's plight of crime without rights and firearms in the hands of the innocent:

Once again metal, so it's not to everyone's tastes, but take a look at some of the lyrics:

A life of petty crime gets punished with a holiday

The victims' mind are scarred for life most everyday

Assailants know just how much further that can go

They know the laws are soft conviction chances low

...

Despondent public worries where it all will end

We can't protect ourselves our kids from the crime trend

We cannot even warn each other of evil in our midst

They have more rights than us, you cannot call that just

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Dolly Parton always gets a nod from me. Here is one of my favorites.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHlhEmBrPSY

--HH

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