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JohnRgt

Yeah, businessmen are heartless

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. – With the help of a $250,000 reward, the founder of the Papa John's pizza chain has finally reunited with the muscle car he sold years ago to help keep his family's business afloat.
"When I first saw it I still wanted to look it over to make sure it was the car even though I knew it," Schnatter told The Associated Press. "That kind of hit me emotionally. I was kind of numb."
The car will be displayed at the company headquarters in Louisville, replacing a replica Schnatter commissioned while he searched for his original car. In honor of the reunion, Papa John's planned to offer all Camaro owners a free pizza at stores on Wednesday.
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. – With the help of a $250,000 reward, the founder of the Papa John's pizza chain has finally reunited with the muscle car he sold years ago to help keep his family's business afloat.
"When I first saw it I still wanted to look it over to make sure it was the car even though I knew it," Schnatter told The Associated Press. "That kind of hit me emotionally. I was kind of numb."
The car will be displayed at the company headquarters in Louisville, replacing a replica Schnatter commissioned while he searched for his original car. In honor of the reunion, Papa John's planned to offer all Camaro owners a free pizza at stores on Wednesday.
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Very good article.

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From evo #148:

Tonino De Paola & his Ferrari F430 -- hairdresser tells how he crimped and saved for 18 years to buy his dream car.

Owning a Ferrari has always been an unshakeable desire of mine, but when you’re a partner in a small hair salon in Peterborough [, UK] it takes a very long time to accumulate the cash, even if you’re squirreling away almost every penny.

I had to endure a lot of stick during the eighteen year it took me to save for my Ferrari. I had to make a lot sacrifices and I didn’t do many of the things normal people do, but boy was it worth it.

When we first got the salon, the F355 was the car of the moment, so that was the aim back then, but as the models changed over the years so did my plans -- and the budget required to live the dream -- but I always wanted the current car.

I finally achieved the goal three years ago, but as you can imagine, building a cashpot for an F430 wasn’t easy.

You could say I’m a little eccentric. I don’t have a mobile phone. I don’t spend money on clothes. I don’t go out a great deal. I very rarely have a holiday and for daily transport I’ve spent years driving around in a ratty old Peugeot 106 that I have a half share in. But for me it’s definitely been worth it.

Ferrari has been a passion since I got my first Matchbox toy as a child and I blame my parents. You’ve probably noticed a strong hint of Italian ancestry in my name -- my parents moved to the UK in the Sixties, and I reckon I was born with this need to own a Ferrari.

That need was further fueled at the age of five when I was given a ride in a family friend’s 308 -- I can still recall the sound of the engine and the smell of the leather.

I think this feeling is the same for every true Italian man -- speak to any of them and they crave to own either a Ferrari, Lamborghini or Maserati. It’s just that I’ve taken that desire to the next level.

The day I finally got my Ferrari was one of the greatest days in my life and the buzz I got from seeing my name on the registration document still hasn’t diminished. Owning the car still gives me exactly the same level of excitement -- it really is a big thing whenever I take it out for a drive.

And because it is so special I choose my moments very carefully and savour every moment.

The tired little 106 is still employed for the regular day-to-day stuff, so I’ve yet to add 4000 miles to the 29000 that the F430 had on the clock when the prancing horse became mine.

The car has not wanted for anything -- all the services are carried out by a main dealer; it has regular valets and I only take it out if the weather’s good. It’s never seen rain while I’ve had it, and I only drive it on Sunday afternoons and Thursday evenings -- as long as the weather is good and if everything ‘s right.

I don’t go far. The longest journey I’ve made was a trip to Cambridge, which can’t be more than sixty miles there and back. But I just love it. After so much anticipation during all the years of saving I can honestly say I don’t regret the sacrifices at all.

In fact the thrill of owning the car has exceeded my hopes. I can’t think of a single thing I would change. Knowing it’s there ready to go makes the long days in the salon worth it -- there’s always a drive to look forward to.

I will always have a Ferrari now. I’ll never part with it. However, I haven’t stopped saving. I’m still probably the only Ferrari owner who doesn’t have a mobile and I’m still not taking expensive holidays or splashing out on designer suits. I’ve got my eye on the 458. That car looks unbelievable.

It’s not cheap though, so it’ll be a while before I’ve got the funds. But I’ll get there, even if it means cutting hair in the same years for another eighteen years!

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This last one reminded me of the quote from Atlas Shrugged:

It is not proper for man’s life to be a circle, she thought, or a string of circles dropping off like zeros behind him—man’s life must be a straight line of motion from goal to farther goal, each leading to the next and to a single growing sum...

Great stories!

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I felt the same way about getting my first wood burning fireplace and in ground swimming pool in my home. I scrimped and saved through dental school, the U.S. Marines, four years of group practice and eleven years in solo private practice to earn them. Every winter evening I enjoy sitting in front of the fireplace and enjoying the warmth and glow of the fire, or every hot summer afternoon I swam lengths in my beautiful pool, I remembered all of the work I did to earn my pleasures. Life is good! Don DDS

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I don't get the purpose of this thread. Is it a materialistic celebration of Miss Rand's ethics? If I'm correct, then you don't get it. Am I out in left field, I don't get the motivation. What is the point of celebrating the truth, arn't you happy that it is true? I hope people answer this post cause I'm missing something.

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I don't get the purpose of this thread. Is it a materialistic celebration of Miss Rand's ethics? If I'm correct, then you don't get it. Am I out in left field, I don't get the motivation. What is the point of celebrating the truth, arn't you happy that it is true? I hope people answer this post cause I'm missing something.

The thread is about the happiness of achieving your goals. In the end, all goals have a material reference. I can't make out what your question is.

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I don't get the purpose of this thread.

The article shows a side of businessmen we rarely hear about, which is a common pet peeve of those who love liberty.

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