Mac

Homework

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This is a painting bought by a connoisseur back in 1983.

homework.jpg

Oils on canvas

14 x 11"

1983

The original buyer of this painting is now in a nursing home, 91 years old. He was a professor of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University, and bought 6 of my own while commissioning me to do 4 of his grandchildren. His daughter owns the painting and was so good as to bring it by from Ohio for me to photograph properly. She would not sell it back at any price.

I have no memory of having painted this, although I've done variations on this subject over the years in various media. What a surprise to see it again!

In the back of the canvas is a card that reads:

"Homework

Oils on canvas

14 x 11"

$85."

That's how it was for this beginning artist. I'd sell fine early works for practically nothing. It was uncanny how my sales in those days would come just at the time we needed to pay the rent. And we lived in an apartment that, in those days, $85.00 would just about cover a month's rent.

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This is a painting bought by a connoisseur back in 1983.

homework.jpg

Oils on canvas

14 x 11"

1983

The original buyer of this painting is now in a nursing home, 91 years old. He was a professor of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University, and bought 6 of my own while commissioning me to do 4 of his grandchildren. His daughter owns the painting and was so good as to bring it by from Ohio for me to photograph properly. She would not sell it back at any price.

I have no memory of having painted this, although I've done variations on this subject over the years in various media. What a surprise to see it again!

In the back of the canvas is a card that reads:

"Homework

Oils on canvas

14 x 11"

$85."

That's how it was for this beginning artist. I'd sell fine early works for practically nothing. It was uncanny how my sales in those days would come just at the time we needed to pay the rent. And we lived in an apartment that, in those days, $85.00 would just about cover a month's rent.

Here is my poem for

Homework

Head bent, with pencil tight in fist,

Brown desk on which she leans to write

Is her whole world tonight.

Long gold hair hangs down;

I cannot see her face;

I only know that her intent

Is write and write and write.

Great model for my paint;

My brush, it has a saint;

Her focused mind the light

That guides my hand tonight.

Fortunate artist, I,

Who needs not search the sky

For inspirations wild;

I've homework and my child.

____________________________

Brian Faulkner

Thank you, Robert.

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Hey that's great! :D I like the way you accented the painting with a poem, Brian. Now all we need is some musical accompaniment!

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Hey that's great! :D I like the way you accented the painting with a poem, Brian. Now all we need is some musical accompaniment!

Thank you, Thales. Robert has given us music for the eyes; what more can you ask for?

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This is a painting bought by a connoisseur back in 1983.

Well done, Mac.

I always find impressive how painters can hold in their imaginations such details as the exact shape of the curves of the muscles or the joints, the linear proportions of the face to the shoulders and the shoulders to the waist etc., not to mention one of the most elusive concepts for me in graphic illustration: perspective. I don't mean the way one can copy something in front of him; I mean the accurate reproduction of a particular pose of the human body that has never been seen by the artist, but which, when assumed by a person, is exactly as the artist painted it. I'm guessing a detailed study of anatomy would have been done by such a painter.

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[...] I mean the accurate reproduction of a particular pose of the human body that has never been seen by the artist [...]

Having thought about my post above some more, I question if it is possible to imagine a part of reality that one has not encountered in its exact form, but whose other similar forms have been encountered at various points in the artist's life.

Philosophically, I am inclined to think that any imagination of a thing derives from at least one observation in reality, exactly as imagined, of the constituents of that thing. I should say that I have yet to complete reading The Romantic Manifesto, and I get the feeling that this subject may have been covered in some of those essays.

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This is a painting bought by a connoisseur back in 1983.

Well done, Mac.

I'm guessing a detailed study of anatomy would have been done by such a painter.

Thank you LJH.

For this artist, yes. And I submit that only by a study of anatomy from drawing the human skeleton and a flayed figure (which shows the superficial muscles) and reading books on artistic anatomy can any artist depict the human form properly. In a college art class in the 1970's I approached the professor with an interest in the study of anatomy. His answer was this: "The study of anatomy is out of fashion." This was the last straw for me. I quit school and bought a disarticulated human skeleton from the local medical supply store and started my studies. No amount of drawing the nude figure from life will get you there lacking knowledge of the underlying structure.

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[...] I mean the accurate reproduction of a particular pose of the human body that has never been seen by the artist [...]

I question if it is possible to imagine a part of reality that one has not encountered in its exact form, but whose other similar forms have been encountered at various points in the artist's life.

The answer is yes.

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[...] I submit that only by a study of anatomy from drawing the human skeleton and a flayed figure (which shows the superficial muscles) and reading books on artistic anatomy can any artist depict the human form properly.

[...]

No amount of drawing the nude figure from life will get you there lacking knowledge of the underlying structure.

Interesting. Thank you for the response.

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