sean

My first scupture and a question.

10 posts in this topic

Well, having been house bound last week here in the Northeast by 3' of global warming has lead me to try a my hand at figure sculpture. I'm a vintage motorcycle Mechanic by trade and have not touched a block of clay sense I was in my teens so, I don't think it's half bad. Anyway, I decided on sculpting the human figure after coming across the definition in the Ayn Rand Lexicon to see if I can better understand where she was coming from when she said that only the figure of man can project a metaphysical meaning and there is little that one can express in the statue of an animal or of an inanimate object. It's is this statement that I find myself in disagreement with for as a lover of vintage design, motorcycles, cars, architecture, etc.. I find that I can get a very good sense of life from their design as well. Maybe not as strong as the human body but they still do offer me a great deal of metaphysical meaning or so it would seem. 2ni4pdc.jpg

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Well, having been house bound last week here in the Northeast by 3' of global warming has lead me to try a my hand at figure sculpture.

Wow, Sean! Impressive! I have to admit I can't stop staring. I probably shouldn't say this but I also want to put my arms around it.

So, is it done to scale? And why did you have to stop without completing the entire figure? You could have left out the face but I would have loved to see the rest of those magnificent curves.

I don't know much about sculpture but I find this amazing! Incidentally, how much are you asking for it? If you wanted to part with it, I mean. I wouldn't.

Que bella! Next time, you must complete it, down to the toes.

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Wow, thanks! The reason I stopped at the neck, shoulders, and legs is that I was contrasting on what I see as the curviest part of the female form. It also offered me the least technically challenging part so I might not give up and lose interest. But, now that I have a better handle at what I what to accomplish, I feel I might be ready to tackle the rest soon on a different piece. As for your your offer, Thanks very much but, I think I'll hang on to it for a little while longer.

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Wow, thanks! The reason I stopped at the neck, shoulders, and legs is that I was contrasting on what I see as the curviest part of the female form. It also offered me the least technically challenging part so I might not give up and lose interest. But, now that I have a better handle at what I what to accomplish, I feel I might be ready to tackle the rest soon on a different piece. As for your your offer, Thanks very much but, I think I'll hang on to it for a little while longer.

Sorry, I meant to say concentrate not contrasting.

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Wow, thanks! The reason I stopped at the neck, shoulders, and legs is that I was contrasting on what I see as the curviest part of the female form. It also offered me the least technically challenging part so I might not give up and lose interest. But, now that I have a better handle at what I what to accomplish, I feel I might be ready to tackle the rest soon on a different piece. As for your your offer, Thanks very much but, I think I'll hang on to it for a little while longer.

Sorry, I meant to say concentrate not contrasting.

I'm not sure how much common ground we have where appreciation of female curves is concerned but I certainly find that strong, well-developed legs are a joy to look at. Of course, I agree that the torso/mid-section is the most beautiful as you say, but if you are interested, I suggest taking a closer look at the beauty that lies below the knee. Very striking to me are the well fleshed out muscle bellies of the calves, easing down to a smooth, somewhat thick, as opposed to bony and skinny, set of ankles and from there, leading to a graceful set of feminine toes.

Let's see if I can find some examples... Figure skaters are an excellent choice to model for legs; those thighs are dynamite! Ballerinas are usually more slender, and not as strong, but sometimes quite good too. Nearly any athlete would do, now that I think about it.

I suppose it is harder to sculpt the joints of the hands and feet because one needs a detailed understanding of the structure within, so I suspect one would require a lot of dedication to be able to do that part of the figure really well. I don't do fine art, but out of curiosity when I used to sketch sections of the human body I found it easier to get away with mistakes in curves because I could always "massage" them back into shape :D. Not so with the angular, bony structures of the face; with those, I had to be dead on. Being very keen on such things, to me even a slight disfigurement in the proportion of a woman's feet would be a disaster to look at in art. I would rather the artist take years to complete a masterpiece, than churn out dozens of "quickies", all of which would make me go "sigh!"

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Let's see if I can find some examples...

Great for portrayal...

post-6542-1266268570.jpg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . post-6542-1266268168.jpg

Not so great for portrayal...

post-6542-1266268617.jpg

Of course, these are examples of what I would like to see in a selective recreation, but I don't mean to imply that it is the case for everyone else.

In any case, have fun! And don't forget to update us on what you're doing.

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Well, having been house bound last week here in the Northeast by 3' of global warming has lead me to try a my hand at figure sculpture.

That is fantastic for a first effort.

If you decide to pursue sculpture seriously, I would like to recommend my friend Stuart Mark Feldman. He is not only a successful professional sculptor (link) (link), but he is an inspiring teacher who has created anatomical reference models (link) for his students.

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Well, having been house bound last week here in the Northeast by 3' of global warming has lead me to try a my hand at figure sculpture.

That is fantastic for a first effort.

If you decide to pursue sculpture seriously, I would like to recommend my friend Stuart Mark Feldman. He is not only a successful professional sculptor (link) (link), but he is an inspiring teacher who has created anatomical reference models (link) for his students.

Thanks, Betsy. Very impressive and inspiring. Already at work on my second piece. Back to my original question though, :" I decided on sculpting the human figure after coming across the definition in the Ayn Rand Lexicon to see if I can better understand where she was coming from when she said that only the figure of man can project a metaphysical meaning and there is little that one can express in the statue of an animal or of an inanimate object. It's is this statement that I find myself in disagreement with, for as a lover of vintage design, motorcycles, cars, architecture, etc.. I find that I can get a very good sense of life from their design as well. Maybe not as strong as the human body but they still do offer me a great deal of metaphysical meaning or so it would seem."

Anyone have an opinion?

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Thanks, Betsy. Very impressive and inspiring. Already at work on my second piece. Back to my original question though, :" I decided on sculpting the human figure after coming across the definition in the Ayn Rand Lexicon to see if I can better understand where she was coming from when she said that only the figure of man can project a metaphysical meaning and there is little that one can express in the statue of an animal or of an inanimate object. It's is this statement that I find myself in disagreement with, for as a lover of vintage design, motorcycles, cars, architecture, etc.. I find that I can get a very good sense of life from their design as well. Maybe not as strong as the human body but they still do offer me a great deal of metaphysical meaning or so it would seem."

Anyone have an opinion?

My guess is that being human, we are particularly sensitive to the ideal human form. There is likely a latent sexuality behind such appreciation - even if one is looking at an artistic creation of the same sex. In that case, it could reflect how one would wish to look to the opposite sex.

Still, In my teen age years, I drew car designs as some sort of expression of creating artistic form. Always there was a girl in mind when I traced it's lines. Not feminine curves, but masculine muscle. People see beauty in many animals, particularly animals of speed. Note how cars are named Cougar, Jaguar, Mustang Lynx and Panther. Sensuousness seems to be the uniting factor.

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