Mac

Any Veterinarian?

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Have 2 outdoor cats, both came around 2 years or so ago. One is perfect. Both are here in the morning for breakfast, but never get too close. It's as if the healthy cat knows the "demented" cat is to be left alone.

One limps on mostly a cut off paw. Has one claw left.

Feed him every day. Got to the point that I can get my hand an inch away. Try to pet him and he flees; even hisses. Otherwise stays around most of the day.

Suspect he was either a "runt" or was mentally damaged, or both. No way I know to catch him to take him to the vet. Suspect brain damage.

Love that poor guy.

Anything from a pro would be happily appreciated.

Thanks much,

Bob

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We had a little runt cat in our house at some point. Never grew to quite the normal size and was a bit crazy, but overall a rather sweet kitty. He was beaten up by the other cats pretty bad though, and one day my parents were keeping my cat (a normal sized male cat), and my cat ripped his throat open and bled him to death...

Stray cats taken in can be the most loving, grateful, & loyal of all cats. Personally I would select one in good health.

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We had a little runt cat in our house at some point. Never grew to quite the normal size and was a bit crazy, but overall a rather sweet kitty. He was beaten up by the other cats pretty bad though, and one day my parents were keeping my cat (a normal sized male cat), and my cat ripped his throat open and bled him to death...

Stray cats taken in can be the most loving, grateful, & loyal of all cats. Personally I would select one in good health.

Yet, our "Big Head" (as we call him), seems healthy in every other way. And seems healthy and rather large, compared to our slim other cat. Our black cat, we call simply "Black" Linda at 60 with "Black won't hurt Big Head, who seems to be tough in every other way, but won't get close to him, except that both sometimes sleep together on the same porch swing some 2 feet apart.

So sorry about your experience.

So sad about Big Head.

Thanks for your reply,

Bob

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...Stray cats taken in can be the most loving, grateful, & loyal of all cats. Personally I would select one in good health.

I agree as my family and I had a few stray cats while living on our horse farm.

Years ago while riding his bicycle home from Driver's Education my older brother would pass a certain field which was blocked off with a hedge row. For close to a week my brother would pass by the hedge row and hear a cat meow and then he would stop to look for the cat. At the end of the week my brother found a tiny little kitten (which looked like a runt) that was all alone and had both tips of his ears full of pellet holes. Tigger (which is what my brother chose to call him) was a mangy looking kitten that we were not sure was going to survive. Well, he did survive and became the best barn cat (he took care of our rodent problem) that we ever had. Tigger was also the toughest car we ever had and that I have ever seen.

For example, while cleaning horse stalls with my brother we heard a huge growl and scream come from our other barn. My brother and I started running to the other barn and before we got to the door Tigger came strolling out with half of one of his ears bitten off. We decided to see what it was that he was fighting with and as we entered into the barn we saw what it was which was now dead, a opossum.

Another time while cleaning stalls I was taking out a wheel barrel and had just dumped the horse manure into the manure spreader when I looked up to see Tigger sneaking like a lion up to our pond (we had a 5 acre spring feed pond). Tigger was sneaking up to the pond because there was a flock of Canadian Geese swimming along the edge of the pond. Once he got about as close to them as he could without being seen he ran and then jumped onto one of them that was about 5-6 feet from shore and landed right on top of that goose. Tigger and the goose went under the surface, but when Tigger came up he had that goose's neck between his teeth and took him off to a safe place to eat.

One more story for fun. While coming into our barn one day I noticed that a lid to the horse's feed bins was off. I walked over to the bin and inside was one fat rat. I quickly put the top back on the bin and went to look for Tigger as I was going to throw him into the bin and let him have his way with this trespasser. Well, my dad and older brother came down soon after me and I told them what I found and what I was going to do. My dad said that he would lift the lid and then I should throw Tigger into the bin and he would close the lid. So, all three of us are standing around this bin and my dad lifts the lid and I throw Tigger into the bin. But before my dad can get the lid on the fat rat swirls up the round bin and races across my dad's and brother's chest with Tigger following right behind, the rat and Tigger missed me. Now, imagine two men, one six foot, four inches and the other six foot, two inches screaming like little girls while trying to smack a rat and cat that had already ran across their chests. Their facial expressions alone was enough to make me burst out laughing which caused them to do the same. Less than five minutes go by and Tigger is walking through the barn with the fat rat in his mouth.

Tigger, who seemed to be a runt, grew into one tough cat that also created a lot of fond memories for me and my family.

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

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Feral cats have had a devastating effect on native wildlife here. They have eradication programs but still can't control the problem.

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Tigger, who seemed to be a runt, grew into one tough cat that also created a lot of fond memories for me and my family.

Are you sure that cat wasn't a marine?

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

I am glad you enjoyed them. It certainly seemed like he was half tiger, many times.

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Tigger, who seemed to be a runt, grew into one tough cat that also created a lot of fond memories for me and my family.

Are you sure that cat wasn't a marine?

He would have made a good one. ;)

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-----------------

Tigger, who seemed to be a runt, grew into one tough cat that also created a lot of fond memories for me and my family.

Are you sure that cat wasn't a marine?

Hear! Hear!

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

Agreed! Thanks, Ray. Among the greatest cat stories ever told.

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

Agreed! Thanks, Ray. Among the greatest cat stories ever told.

Thank you for the kind words.

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

Agreed! Thanks, Ray. Among the greatest cat stories ever told.

Thank you for the kind words.

I agree. great stories, Ray. Thanks.

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

Agreed! Thanks, Ray. Among the greatest cat stories ever told.

Thank you for the kind words.

I agree. great stories, Ray. Thanks.

I am glad you liked them, Brian.

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Great stories Ray, thanks! This runt must have been half tiger indeed.

Agreed! Thanks, Ray. Among the greatest cat stories ever told.

Thank you for the kind words.

I agree. great stories, Ray. Thanks.

And my thanks to B. Royce for his recommendation of books by Richard and Frances Lockridge. I'm in the middle of their "Murder in a Hurry". What insight the authors have of cats and animals. I thought the best cat books were by Paul Gallico, and they are good, but the Lockridge's are outstanding.

Back to my original thought, our "Big Head" is not a runt if a runt is small. His big head is proportional to his large body. It's a crying shame to see him hobble along slowly on three legs, and it's obvious he's in pain. I guess he has lived through some 7 or 8 of his lives before he found us. He's just slow. Takes forever to eat. I'm sure he's got brain damage done by some "human(s)". But he will defend his area from another stray that keeps trying to adopt us. Again, it's so sad to hear him try to give a meow. He tries his best but it comes out tiny and labored.

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