Cadence

What is New Hampshire like?

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If anyone has any information, please share - particularly information about Southern/Southeastern NH cities. If the information that you have is about New Hampshire in general, I welcome that as well.

It can be absolutely anything that you know and/or want to share about the state. Thanks in advance.

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If anyone has any information, please share - particularly information about Southern/Southeastern NH cities. If the information that you have is about New Hampshire in general, I welcome that as well.

It can be absolutely anything that you know and/or want to share about the state. Thanks in advance.

Cadence,

What sort of information would you like to have?

I lived in Keene, NH from 1979 until 1984. Keene is in the Southwest corner of the state.

First, what NH does not have is state income tax or sales tax.

I have little first hand knowledge about the the Eastern side of the state.

I am originally from Vermont and I can tell you that for two states, similar in geography,

population and economy you could not find two more different politically. NH might go

to the Republican side in next Presidential election. Vermont gave Obama the 2nd

highest percent vote next to Hawaii.

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If anyone has any information, please share - particularly information about Southern/Southeastern NH cities. If the information that you have is about New Hampshire in general, I welcome that as well.

It can be absolutely anything that you know and/or want to share about the state. Thanks in advance.

I can't speak for the Southern/Southeastern NH cities. However, I have spent a good bit of time on the Ashland/Holderness end of the Squam/Winnipesaukee Lakes area. This part of New Hampshire is an extraordinarily beautiful one, particularly from the late Spring through a gloriously colorful Autumn (mid-September into October). The lakes themselves and the little towns that dot Lake Winnipesaukee in particular are wonderful little havens for art, music and food with plenty of water and other outdoor activities abounding. The movie, On Golden Pond, was filmed primarily at the Thayer House on Big Squam Lake (a mostly private lake with privately owned beachfront, but with some limited public access) and in the Holderness Village center on Little Squam Lake. One does get to see a little of what the area has to offer when watching the film, but nothing quite prepares you for the beauty of Big Squam Lake when seen in person. This part of the state is quintessentially New England (village greens, white clapboard structures and pointed church steeples, etc.), but with somewhat lower price tags than similar spots in Vermont for example.

In addition, by following Route 93 several miles to the north of Ashland you arrive at the White Mountains and, a little further beyond, at Franconia Notch . . . spectacular areas for climbing and hiking as well as skiing during the Winter Months, although the weather and snows can be quite brutal here during that time of year. A drive Into the White Mountain Forest will bring you to Bretton Woods, the historic Inn at Mount Washington, and to Mount Washington itself, the highest point in the Eastern U.S.

I found that the magnificent open spaces, forests, mountains and waterways, and the generally sparse population of the area combine to create a real sense of distance and remoteness from the "outside" world, something I truly enjoyed . . . at least for a time.

The first time I visited this area, I stayed in a charming B&B just outside Ashland. One evening, the innkeeper and I were enjoying some wine in the inn's kitchen when I mentioned that one thing I had wanted to see during that visit was a moose, an animal I had never seen up close but that I had read moved in large numbers in that part of the state. After informing me that these large animals were quite nonplussed by humans, he directed my attention to a large picture window that looked towards a wooded area on the back of the inn's property. There, in the window, watching us as calmly as you please, was a large bull moose! Over the next few days in the area, I saw many more.

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If anyone has any information, please share - particularly information about Southern/Southeastern NH cities. If the information that you have is about New Hampshire in general, I welcome that as well.

It can be absolutely anything that you know and/or want to share about the state. Thanks in advance.

What is your purpose in asking?

Southeast New Hampshire has become an extension of the Boston metropolitan area. It's much more congested and developed than the rest of the state and the change and increase in population over the last several decades in that region has politically dominated the rural areas and made what had been a 'Republican' state into a 'liberal' extension of Massachusetts, though not yet as bad. Taxes and bureaucracy are still better than average nationwide and there is still no income tax on personal earned income and no general sales tax, but property taxes in NH are high. There is a very short section of southeast NH on the Atlantic coast between Massachusetts and Maine, but it is congested and does not have the nicest beaches and scenery of the northeast coast -- not a place you would ordinarily move to for the beaches if you had a choice.

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If anyone has any information, please share - particularly information about Southern/Southeastern NH cities. If the information that you have is about New Hampshire in general, I welcome that as well.

It can be absolutely anything that you know and/or want to share about the state. Thanks in advance.

What is your purpose in asking?

I am looking for a place to move within the next year. It's a shame to hear about the extension of Boston into New Hampshire. My main consideration in moving is going to a place with a low unemployment rate. I like New Hampshire because of its lack of state and income tax (I don't know what personal earned income is), and a lot of its laws I believe to reflect a personal freedom attitude (lack of seatbelt and helmet laws, for example). They don't have strict firearm laws, from what I know, and that is a positive. So I suppose I should have been more specific in my question - what are the pros and cons of living in New Hampshire?

Ex: Are the property taxes so high that they make up for the lack of sales/income tax? What is the crime rate like? Can a general statement be made about the attitude of its residents? What is the job market like? Is the weather unbearably cold and gloomy? Etc.

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