Abaco

The Forgotten Man

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Has anybody read this one? I just started and will try to report back on it. So far, I've found it to be entertaining. It is a revised history of the Great Depression and the parallels to what is going on today are chilling. One factor is the passing of large, vague laws that have serious impact to business. Moves like the "healthcare reform" did and do hurt the economy as business holds cash waiting to see what will happen. (Roosevelt just passed a tax of the held profits) There was also a growing competition between the public and private sectors as pointed out by Ms. Shlaes - with the Tennessee Valley Authority vs. Commonwealth and Southern as an example. She has already mentioned Alexis de Tocqueville's theory of A and B deciding that A, B, and C should help X...C being the forgotten man who's expected to pay for it. Pretty dense reading, as I'm only on page 13! ;)

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My mistake. It was William Sumner who came up with the "forgotten man" theory, not Tocqueville. Already a bunch of players in the story...

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My mistake. It was William Sumner who came up with the "forgotten man" theory, not Tocqueville. Already a bunch of players in the story...

Thanks for the correction, but I do not even think it matters. The reason I do not think it matters is because I think people like Obama, Roosevelt and their ilk just evade how things are going to get paid for and who they are going to steal from.

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The film My Man Godfrey (1936), a fine romantic-comedy-drama with William Powell and Carole Lombard, is explicitly devoted to the theme of the Forgotten Man.

Thanks for the heads up. Perhaps I'll get the time to check it out.

Ray, your response made me laugh out loud. I suppose you are right that it doesn't matter. It's as though people like us who recognize the theft are in the minority. Speaking of Mr. C or the forgotten man is like speaking Greek. ;)

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My mistake. It was William Sumner who came up with the "forgotten man" theory, not Tocqueville. Already a bunch of players in the story...

Thanks for the correction, but I do not even think it matters. The reason I do not think it matters is because I think people like Obama, Roosevelt and their ilk just evade how things are going to get paid for and who they are going to steal from.

It doesn't matter to them, but history and the bad ideas that caused it matters to us.

Amity Shlaes' Forgotten Man was named after the Sumner idea but is about the economic and political history of the FDR era and is well worth reading. A number of such histories have been published in the last few years, but a much earlier one we have discussed here on the Forum before is John T Flynn's The Roosevelt Myth from the 1940s, 2nd ed in the 50s. I think Ray said he has read that one. He was there and saw the whole thing unravel (Flynn, not Ray!), tried to report on it in articles, and was even the victim of an attempt by FDR himself interfering with Flynn's publisher in an attempt to silence him. Flynn started as a prominent writer for the New Republic and supporter of FDR but was soon appalled at what he saw FDR doing.

The real "revisionist" history is by those who worship FDR. The history and its cause is really straightforward to understand once you sweep away the propaganda that has become common myth presenting FDR as God that we were all taught. It is good that these books about what really happened under FDR's rule are starting to circulate.

An upcoming Ken Burns "documentary" is going to be about the "Roosevelts" -- Theodore, Franklin and Eleanor -- another of Burns' propaganda flicks pushing his progressivism and its perpetrators as heroes. The more people know about the real history the better. Burns is not "America's documentarian", he is an anti-American propagandist on behalf of the progressive left and it's time people started realizing that and denouncing him for it.

Get all the information you can on what the early progressives actually did and why. The "parallels" with that today mentioned by Abaco are really much more than similarities with FDR and more than "parallels" -- this is a continuation of the same collectivist-statist- pragmatist principles that took hold in America in the late 1800s and which are causing continuing destruction.

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It doesn't matter to them, but history and the bad ideas that caused it matters to us....

...Get all the information you can on what the early progressives actually did and why. The "parallels" with that today mentioned by Abaco are really much more than similarities with FDR and more than "parallels" -- this is a continuation of the same collectivist-statist- pragmatist principles that took hold in America in the late 1800s and which are causing continuing destruction.

I agree with you and what you stated above is what my earlier statements were meant to mean.

I do own the 2nd edition of John T. Flynn's The Roosevelt Myth which I think is a very good book. I offer that people get the 2nd edition as Mr. Flynn updates this edition with information that he did not have when he wrote the first edition. I also offer another book worthy of reading, which is Jim Powell's FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression . I also recommend Richard Salsman's lectures and pamphlets as I have found that they are all enlightening on many different subjects such as history and economics.

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I also recommend Richard Salsman's lectures and pamphlets as I have found that they are all enlightening on many different subjects such as history and economics.

Do you have a list of what they are on the 1930s and 40s? He wrote some excellent articles on government policies and goals in the 1920s leading up to the crash, published in The Intellectual Activist several years ago. As I recall he included some interesting criticisms on the limitation of Von Mises and the Austrian school of economics.

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I also recommend Richard Salsman's lectures and pamphlets as I have found that they are all enlightening on many different subjects such as history and economics.

Do you have a list of what they are on the 1930s and 40s? He wrote some excellent articles on government policies and goals in the 1920s leading up to the crash, published in The Intellectual Activist several years ago. As I recall he included some interesting criticisms on the limitation of Von Mises and the Austrian school of economics.

Some of Richard Salsman's works are:

The Cause and Consequence of the Great Depression (lecture)

The Collapse of Deposit Insurance (pamphlet)

Gold and Liberty (soft cover book)

These can all be found online at the Ayn Rand bookstore.

And you are correct; Richard Salsman criticizes Von Mises, the Austrian and Monetarist schools of economics while also objectively explaining what should properly replace their fundamentally flawed theories.

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