Cadence

Best Type of Exercise

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One wonders why the Colorado experiment has not been replicated in a more scientific setting. It would be very interesting.

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One wonders why the Colorado experiment has not been replicated in a more scientific setting. It would be very interesting.

What do you mean? The study was done at a university where it was surpervised by a man with a Ph.D. behind his name (which seems to be important to most people), published and then, unfortunately, discarded by most.

In all my years of training other people I have come to the conclusion that most people do not want the most efficient way to train, they want the easiest way to train. In other words, they want the hype of exercising being so "easy and fun" to be true. Most people want the next "ab machine" to work "miracles" although very little effort has to be put forth. Hell, in a society where over-eating has become the norm and stomach surgery becomes the answer, instead of discipline, to their choice of over-eating then it does not surprise me when very few want to hear that to gain muscle takes an intense effort.

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Ray, essentially, I'd love to see a larger number of subjects, and a more average selection of random subjects. As Arthur Jones says, the experiment was applied on 2 men who were athletes to start with and were rebuilding previously existing muscle mass. Plus there are countless associated research that could be done:

- Age,

- Sex,

- Ability of people to train effectively over time with our without a coach,

- Ideal selection of exercises,

- Ideal number of reps,

- Comparative effectiveness of normal, negative, and negative only training, etc.

I wonder how much Casey Viator must have been eating to gain 63 lbs of muscle in 28 days!

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Joss, first off, I only brought in the example to demonstrate that Arnold's training of multiple hours per day was, for the most part, a waste of time in comparison to another genetic freak of his equivalent. In other words the experiment was not set up to answer your questions, but to see how much muscle could be grown over a very short amount of time.

The real test is done on the person of average genetics of which I have been training other people for more than 20 years and in my office I have had more than 46,000 individual training sessions. How many more people do you want? How many studies carry on this long and have to deal with the adjustments that are needed when a person's strength out-grows their ability to recuperate and grow while also still staying healthy?

I once remember reading, in a joking manner, that Arthur Jones was stuffing everything down Casey Viator's throat except the kitchen sink. With that said, it only takes 16 extra calories to generate a pound of muscle, so it is not as much as almost everyone seems to think.

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Ray,

With all due respect, your work is not a proper scientific experiment. It's another data point, and it's very valuable as such, but it's not a scientific experiment. I'd love to see you publish your work in a peer-reviewed journal, but I suspect that to be accepted you would have to adopt different protocols, probably incompatible with running a business. I've always thought that you should write a book. It would have multiple advantages: (1) money & some measure of credit for you, (2) exposure for your findings, (3) benefits to many people. You could write a consumer-oriented book without having to follow scientific level protocols. Maybe such a publication would prompt more research and help discover refinements.

Are you saying 16 extra calories on top of a normal intake of 2,000 or 2,500? His digestion must have looked completely different during the training.

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Joss, with all due respect I disagree with you and I have quoted my response in another thread for your viewing below.

"I disagree with you on your statements from above on what a person (scientist) should be determining from the facts gathered.

Science is defined as:

- a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws.

- systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.

- systematized knowledge in general.

- knowledge, as of facts or principles; knowledge gained by systematic study.

- skill, esp. reflecting a precise application of facts or principles; proficiency.

Ayn Rand had this to say about science:

"Science was born as a result and consequence of philosophy; it cannot survive without a philosophical (particularly epistemological) base. If philosophy perishes, science will be next to go." [“For the New Intellectual,” For the New Intellectual, 44.]

"The disintegration of philosophy in the nineteenth century and its collapse in the twentieth have led to a similar, though much slower and less obvious, process in the course of modern science.

Today’s frantic development in the field of technology has a quality reminiscent of the days preceding the economic crash of 1929: riding on the momentum of the past, on the unacknowledged remnants of an Aristotelian epistemology, it is a hectic, feverish expansion, heedless of the fact that its theoretical account is long since overdrawn—that in the field of scientific theory, unable to integrate or interpret their own data, scientists are abetting the resurgence of a primitive mysticism. In the humanities, however, the crash is past, the depression has set in, and the collapse of science is all but complete.

The clearest evidence of it may be seen in such comparatively young sciences as psychology and political economy. In psychology, one may observe the attempt to study human behavior without reference to the fact that man is conscious. In political economy, one may observe the attempt to study and to devise social systems without reference to man.

It is philosophy that defines and establishes the epistemological criteria to guide human knowledge in general and specific sciences in particular." [“What Is Capitalism?” Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, 11.]

Maybe most do not do science as I do. But that does not mean that I cannot determine what a proper diet (and in this instance, exercise) should be (formulating principles/general laws) by interpreting and integrating the facts and or data collected through observation and experimentation."

I do everyone of the things listed under the definition of science and more as each client is a seperate experiment that is later added to the totality of a life-time of experiments.

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In any case, I still think you should write a book. I'd buy it.

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In any case, I still think you should write a book. I'd buy it.

Thank you, Joss, I appreciate your remarks.

I have started to recollect a large amount of previous articles/studies and general information to do just what you state. I originally learned this information to enhance my own workouts and knowledge of the human body without any thought of ever writing a book on the subject. But, after many years of accumulating all this knowledge and years worth of research and application I think it might be time to put it all together in an essentialized manner. I will let you know how I progress.

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In any case, I still think you should write a book. I'd buy it.

I would be interested in buying it as well. Since you are considering writing one, please inform us when it is published and where it can be purchased.

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In any case, I still think you should write a book. I'd buy it.

I would be interested in buying it as well. Since you are considering writing one, please inform us when it is published and where it can be purchased.

Will do.

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I have been exercising once a week (I do not have weights; I can't afford them at this time) doing things like leg lifts while hanging, stepping up and down from a chair, straight leg lifts from the ground, pull ups, push ups, and ankle lifts (tucking one foot behind the other and lifting up on my ankle). I begin my exercise with jumping jacks until my heart rate is up.

I find that my biggest problem is that at times I cannot do the exercise until muscle failure because I feel nauseated. I've noticed (I've only been doing these exercises for 3 weeks) that the cardiovascular aspect of the workout is the hardest part for me. After my 20-30 minute workout is finished, I feel intense nausea and tension in my chest area. Does getting used to the cardiovascular aspect of exercising usually take this long? Is there anything I can do to make it "better"?

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I have been exercising once a week (I do not have weights; I can't afford them at this time) doing things like leg lifts while hanging, stepping up and down from a chair, straight leg lifts from the ground, pull ups, push ups, and ankle lifts (tucking one foot behind the other and lifting up on my ankle). I begin my exercise with jumping jacks until my heart rate is up.

I find that my biggest problem is that at times I cannot do the exercise until muscle failure because I feel nauseated. I've noticed (I've only been doing these exercises for 3 weeks) that the cardiovascular aspect of the workout is the hardest part for me. After my 20-30 minute workout is finished, I feel intense nausea and tension in my chest area. Does getting used to the cardiovascular aspect of exercising usually take this long? Is there anything I can do to make it "better"?

This seems like it would be a high number of repetitions on most exercises(depending on your strength and conditioning of course). That would build up a lot of lactic acid causing nausea, and eventually throwing up if you keep going. With more time you'll get a higher tolerance for it, but if it's too uncomfortable just back off a little bit and gradualy increase the intensity.

I would suggest setting up specific goals for each workout. Things you know you can achieve. Easy at first, then more and more challenging as you go on. That way you will have accomplished something each workout and you won't push yourself too far in the beginning.

Also a little tip if you can't afford the expensive comercial gyms, see if you can find some lifters club in your area. I'm not sure how they work where you live, but around here they are usually driven like non-profit organizations. They are much less polished and the clientele is often intimidating looking guys that make a lot of noise and lift huge weights, but most of them are real friendly and helpful and the memberships are a lot cheaper.

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non-profit

Sorry, should have warned you my post was not safe for work... :D

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I have been exercising once a week (I do not have weights; I can't afford them at this time) doing things like leg lifts while hanging, stepping up and down from a chair, straight leg lifts from the ground, pull ups, push ups, and ankle lifts (tucking one foot behind the other and lifting up on my ankle). I begin my exercise with jumping jacks until my heart rate is up.

I find that my biggest problem is that at times I cannot do the exercise until muscle failure because I feel nauseated. I've noticed (I've only been doing these exercises for 3 weeks) that the cardiovascular aspect of the workout is the hardest part for me. After my 20-30 minute workout is finished, I feel intense nausea and tension in my chest area. Does getting used to the cardiovascular aspect of exercising usually take this long? Is there anything I can do to make it "better"?

While exercising you, obviously, draw on energy to keep going. When you begin to deplete the energy running through you blood-stream (primarily glucose) your body will need quick energy fast. This is usually part of the cause of nausea as your liver cannot process energy fast enough to keep you going forever. So, the body draws on the energy from the easiest place to do so, the brain. When your muscles are under stress and you deplete your resources in your blood-stream you will automatically draw on oxygen and glucose from the brain which causes one to feel dis-oriented and hence nauseated. I recommend that you eat a meal about 2-3 hours before the workout and then eat quickly after the workout. If you feel to nauseated to eat after a workout I offer that you drink a pint of chocolate milk at it allows the brain to quickly recoup it's loss glucose/sugar. I do this with almost all of my clients that feel what you are feeling and it almost always goes away after their body becomes more efficient.

As Red already stated, there will be a lactic acid buildup and this is normal and no way to stop it. Under normal situations there is nothing wrong with feeling nor releasing lactic acid. It does take time for your blood-stream, in concert with your metabolism, to weed off the build-up of lactic acid which goes to the liver. Once in the liver, lactic acid can be converted into glucose and sent back out to the muscles for use. If the activity is already ended, your body will store it back in the muscle in the form of glycogen. There is no way to stop or redirect any of these items within your body. But, you can push your body hard, for a short duration which stimulates a change that makes normal actions much easier. In other words, exercise is not primarily supposed to be comfortable, but instead it is supposed to be producing results.

And also like Red, I advise that your find a cheap gym and start lifting with weights as all the duration in the world will never produce what intensity of efforts produces.

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Thank you Red and RayK for your responses. Glad to hear that it's normal and that it will go away eventually. I really dread exercising because it is so unpleasant, but I try to keep in mind that in the long-term it is very beneficial and necessary.

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You can do fairly high intensity exercises without material. For example, you can do push ups (pecs), push ups with your feet on top of a chair or a table (pecs & shoulders), dips (triceps), squats (thighs), lunges (butt), and the plank (core). All you need is a mirror to check your form. If you do slow (5 sec down, 5 sec up) reps of the above, plus 30 sec planks, you'll build up strength.

Do some research, and you'll find ways to make the exercises more challenging over time.

This cannot take you very far, but as a start it will give you a good base.

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I plan on taking 2 "Physical Education" classes next semester. I weigh 90 lbs and haven't really exercised for 5 years or more (other than walking/playing light tennis), but none of these activities were on a consistent basis.

My question is: what would be the best exercise classes to take for me (given my body weight and lack of muscle/exercise)? Since I have not exercised for so long, I get sore really easily, so I don't want to take a weight training class (I don't think I could keep up). Instead, I plan to take a tennis class (for aerobic/cardiovascular exercise) and a Pilates class (for better flexibility etc.), or Kickboxing (for muscular strength, cardio, and endurance). If anyone has any better suggestions, however, I would love to hear them. I plan, in the future, to take up swimming (if you have any comments about swimming, please share), but my school does not have a pool, so I cannot take a swimming course.

Cadence. I have been "working out" since I was about 8. I've boxed, played college football, wrestled, hiked, ran road races, played basketball, lifted weights like a maniac (still do). I've come to realize that when it comes to physical exercise to improve one's health there are three areas to work on. 1-cardiovascular strength, 2-muscular strength, and 3-flexibility. I suggest not shying away from any type of class. And, this is very important, don't worry about "keeping up" with the others. Physical fitness isn't about keeping up. Another thing that caught my attention is that you haven't really exercised for 5 years or more. Try to make exercise a part of your life. Don't have to kill yourself. Just stay active.

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I plan on taking 2 "Physical Education" classes next semester. I weigh 90 lbs and haven't really exercised for 5 years or more (other than walking/playing light tennis), but none of these activities were on a consistent basis.

My question is: what would be the best exercise classes to take for me (given my body weight and lack of muscle/exercise)? Since I have not exercised for so long, I get sore really easily, so I don't want to take a weight training class (I don't think I could keep up). Instead, I plan to take a tennis class (for aerobic/cardiovascular exercise) and a Pilates class (for better flexibility etc.), or Kickboxing (for muscular strength, cardio, and endurance). If anyone has any better suggestions, however, I would love to hear them. I plan, in the future, to take up swimming (if you have any comments about swimming, please share), but my school does not have a pool, so I cannot take a swimming course.

Cadence. I have been "working out" since I was about 8. I've boxed, played college football, wrestled, hiked, ran road races, played basketball, lifted weights like a maniac (still do). I've come to realize that when it comes to physical exercise to improve one's health there are three areas to work on. 1-cardiovascular strength, 2-muscular strength, and 3-flexibility. I suggest not shying away from any type of class. And, this is very important, don't worry about "keeping up" with the others. Physical fitness isn't about keeping up. Another thing that caught my attention is that you haven't really exercised for 5 years or more. Try to make exercise a part of your life. Don't have to kill yourself. Just stay active.

If one pushes their muscles to their limits the other two items you mention will take care of themselves. In other words one does not need to focu on "cardiovascular strength" nor "flexibility" one only need to work their muscles and the other aspects will follow. The muscle-skeleton system is the primary system of function and if one wants to enhance the it's sub-systems they will ALWAYS have to go through the muscle, so there is only one real area to work.

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If one pushes their muscles to their limits the other two items you mention will take care of themselves. In other words one does not need to focu on "cardiovascular strength" nor "flexibility" one only need to work their muscles and the other aspects will follow. The muscle-skeleton system is the primary system of function and if one wants to enhance the it's sub-systems they will ALWAYS have to go through the muscle, so there is only one real area to work.

What do you mean by the first statement, "If one pushes their muscles to their limits"?

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If one pushes their muscles to their limits the other two items you mention will take care of themselves. In other words one does not need to focu on "cardiovascular strength" nor "flexibility" one only need to work their muscles and the other aspects will follow. The muscle-skeleton system is the primary system of function and if one wants to enhance the it's sub-systems they will ALWAYS have to go through the muscle, so there is only one real area to work.

What do you mean by the first statement, "If one pushes their muscles to their limits"?

The key to stimulating adaptations is to push to the point of momentary muscular dyskinesia (failure) as it is what sends the signal to the nervous system to start systematic adaptations. The human body is so efficient that it will not waste resources to make systematic adaptations for doing things that are already within our resources to do.

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Ray - do you not think that some strong lifters loose some range of motion overtime, despite the fact that they strength-train?

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Ray - do you not think that some strong lifters loose some range of motion overtime, despite the fact that they strength-train?

If and when people lose their range of motion "overtime" it is most likely because their loss of muscle that causes a lose in functionability and flexibility NOT because of their strength-training. Rational strength-training enhances the body and does NOT destroy it. A concrete example with older people that have never strength-trained at all yet still lose the muscle and flexibility, just look at most people's grandparents.

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One thing I noticed when doing leg presses is that once I got over a certain weight, I felt more sore in buttocks area even though the initial period of "I went to the gym for the first time in 3 years and I feel like Frankenstein" was past. Is this an example of more systemic stimulation due to more weight? Another effect I noticed is that as the weeks went on and weights increased, I felt less lactic acid buildup in my thighs while doing leg press. Now I get to failure without that distinct burning sensation, only regular fatigue from intensity.

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One thing I noticed when doing leg presses is that once I got over a certain weight, I felt more sore in buttocks area even though the initial period of "I went to the gym for the first time in 3 years and I feel like Frankenstein" was past. Is this an example of more systemic stimulation due to more weight? Another effect I noticed is that as the weeks went on and weights increased, I felt less lactic acid buildup in my thighs while doing leg press. Now I get to failure without that distinct burning sensation, only regular fatigue from intensity.

Both the items you mention are normal effects of lifting with heavy enough weights to stimulate a systematic response. There is no way to jump over those initial workouts and if people keep pushing themselves in an intense manner they will benefit even more although it does not happen overnight.

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It's pretty cool that the same exercises start to affect different and larger areas when the weight goes up. People shouldn't let the initial full week of muscle soreness and stiffness, along with getting lactic acid burn in mid-set, dissuade them from weight training. It's not representative of what it's like later on. I still lift to failure and the soreness typically doesn't last more than two days.

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