Cadence

Best Type of Exercise

54 posts in this topic

It's pretty cool that the same exercises start to affect different and larger areas when the weight goes up. People shouldn't let the initial full week of muscle soreness and stiffness, along with getting lactic acid burn in mid-set, dissuade them from weight training. It's not representative of what it's like later on. I still lift to failure and the soreness typically doesn't last more than two days.

True, and I would add that the rewards are worth any discomfort one might feel.

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Ray - do you not think that some strong lifters loose some range of motion overtime, despite the fact that they strength-train?

If and when people lose their range of motion "overtime" it is most likely because their loss of muscle that causes a lose in functionability and flexibility NOT because of their strength-training. Rational strength-training enhances the body and does NOT destroy it. A concrete example with older people that have never strength-trained at all yet still lose the muscle and flexibility, just look at most people's grandparents.

Of course if people workout to often, with or without weights, they can speed up their deterioration and lose their muscle, range of motion/functionability and flexibility. For example, it has been shown that people who do steady state activities lose 3 times as much lean body tissue after maturation in constrast to a lethargic person. So, over time the person attempting to constantly keep active and "burn calories" or "keep in shape" is actually working countrer-productive to their goal, if their goal is to remain healthy. And when the steady state activity person loses their lean body tissue (mostly muscle) they also lose their bone mineral density, their ligament and tendon density, cardio-vascular efficiency, flexibility, functionability, joint strength and more. This has all been demonstrated in studies years ago, but still most people seem oblivious to the ill effects and keep on down the self-destructive trail.

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If one pushes their muscles to their limits the other two items you mention will take care of themselves. In other words one does not need to focu on "cardiovascular strength" nor "flexibility" one only need to work their muscles and the other aspects will follow. The muscle-skeleton system is the primary system of function and if one wants to enhance the it's sub-systems they will ALWAYS have to go through the muscle, so there is only one real area to work.
I suppose it's a matter of perspective. I have gotten leaner from lifting weights. And, if I lift in a manner tought to me by my boxing coach, I can gain some cardiovascular capability. Some of these lifts, for example, involve 3-minute sets and are extremely taxing. It's not unusual for my heart rate to be up around 165 after a set. I've worked this in with my long-time habit of heavier lifting to failure (sets of 4 to 12 reps). In the perspective of the average American who might drive a desk for a living and take walks around the neighborhood I certainly think that adding basic lifting would be a huge benefit. But, I have an unusual level of activity for my age (well into my 40s now). I still enjoy boxing as part of my workout routine. I don't spar very often anymore (I'm amazed at what Evander Holyfield can do at his age) but spend lots of time jumping rope, floor work, hitting the heavy bag, etc. I also like to hit the links regularly. In my case, stretching has been valuable for maintaining a decent golf swing. Yoga changed my golf game almost immediately (from horrible to no longer embarrassing). But, I'd never think about getting in the ring for a few rounds with a kid half my age without having road work as part of my routine. I'd get killed. The level of cardiovascular performance that requires is something I can't get with lifting alone. But, like I said, I think it's a matter of perspective.

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If one pushes their muscles to their limits the other two items you mention will take care of themselves. In other words one does not need to focu on "cardiovascular strength" nor "flexibility" one only need to work their muscles and the other aspects will follow. The muscle-skeleton system is the primary system of function and if one wants to enhance the it's sub-systems they will ALWAYS have to go through the muscle, so there is only one real area to work.
I suppose it's a matter of perspective. I have gotten leaner from lifting weights. And, if I lift in a manner tought to me by my boxing coach, I can gain some cardiovascular capability. Some of these lifts, for example, involve 3-minute sets and are extremely taxing. It's not unusual for my heart rate to be up around 165 after a set. I've worked this in with my long-time habit of heavier lifting to failure (sets of 4 to 12 reps). In the perspective of the average American who might drive a desk for a living and take walks around the neighborhood I certainly think that adding basic lifting would be a huge benefit. But, I have an unusual level of activity for my age (well into my 40s now). I still enjoy boxing as part of my workout routine. I don't spar very often anymore (I'm amazed at what Evander Holyfield can do at his age) but spend lots of time jumping rope, floor work, hitting the heavy bag, etc. I also like to hit the links regularly. In my case, stretching has been valuable for maintaining a decent golf swing. Yoga changed my golf game almost immediately (from horrible to no longer embarrassing). But, I'd never think about getting in the ring for a few rounds with a kid half my age without having road work as part of my routine. I'd get killed. The level of cardiovascular performance that requires is something I can't get with lifting alone. But, like I said, I think it's a matter of perspective.

The thing you mention has nothing to do with road work, it has to do with the SAID principle, Specific Adaptations to Implied Demands. If you want to become efficient at something you must first have the physical strength to complete the function. Then one must practice the sport/activity in the closet manner to the real thing. There is no such thing as "cross-training," except in marketing which has nothing to do with the way the human body/brain functions. What probably helped you in golf is practicing golf.

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