MRZ

Quotes

178 posts in this topic

"When Mount Tambora in Indonesia erupted in 1813, it ejected 211 million tons of chloride [into the atmosphere]. At the highest rate of worldwide CFC production, it would have taken about 282 years to produce as much chloride-yielding CFCs as this one eruption."

- from Environmental Overkill: Whatever Happened to Common Sense? (Dixy Lee Ray with Lou Guzzo. HarperPerennial (1994), p. 34.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the delightfully witty murder mystery, Murder Has Its Points (1961), by Richard and Frances Lockridge:

Don't stick your neck out. But if you stick your neck out, tell somebody you're going to. But if you don't tell somebody you're going to, have a convincing reason for not telling. But if your reason would not convince most people, be sure that it convinces you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, I think this one is very appropriate for the school I'm going to. It's hard to explain without being here, but given the other threads on college, I think there's some of you may relate.

"We're drowning in information and starving for knowledge." - R. Reynolds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sadly, I think this one is very appropriate for the school I'm going to. It's hard to explain without being here, but given the other threads on college, I think there's some of you may relate.

"We're drowning in information and starving for knowledge." - R. Reynolds

Apropo to this is will Rogers' statement that "The problem in America isn't so much what people don't know; the problem is what people think they know that just ain't so."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that, Brian. Additionally, it looks like I credited "Reynolds" when I meant "Rogers". In my defense, I just took my Fluid Mechanics final Friday...the Reynolds number is very useful dimensionless parameter for modeling in fluids. I guess I'm still in "test mode".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for that, Brian. Additionally, it looks like I credited "Reynolds" when I meant "Rogers". In my defense, I just took my Fluid Mechanics final Friday...the Reynolds number is very useful dimensionless parameter for modeling in fluids. I guess I'm still in "test mode".

Well, Zak, as long as you passed that test you are excused. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the spiritual forefathers of our current political leaders:

Progressive activist Jane Addams (1895): "We must demand that the individual shall be willing to lose the sense of personal achievement, and shall be content to realize his activity only in connection to the activity of many."

Woodrow Wilson, on campaign: "While we are followers of Jefferson, there is one principle of Jefferson's which no longer can obtain in the practical politics of America. You know it was Jefferson who said that the best government is that which does as little governing as possible...But that time is passed. America is not now and cannot in the future be a place for unrestricted individual enterprise."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The clergy...believe that any portion of power confided to me [as President] will be exerted in opposition to their schemes. And they believe rightly: for I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." - Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Rush, 1800.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Jonah Goldberg's 2007 book, Liberal Fascism, the secret historyof the American left from Mussolini to the politics of Meaning:

H.G. Wells: "These new (fascist) organizations are not merely organizations for the spread of defined opinions. The world is sick of parliamentary politics. The Fascist Party, to the best of its ability, is Italy now. The Communist Party, to the best of its ability, is Russia. Obviously the Fascists of Liberalism must carry out a parallel ambition on a still vaster scale. They must begin as a disciplined sect, but they must end as the sustaining organization of a reconstituted mankind."

Says Mr. Goldberg, "Wells was an enormous fan of FDR's, and the two met often at the White House. Wells pronounced Roosevelt "the most effective transmitting instrument possible for the coming of the new world order."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, from the above source:

"Mussolini once said, 'I have a barbaric cocept of socialism. I understand it as the greatest act of negation and destruction...Onward, you new barbarians!...Like all barbarians you are the harbingers of a new civilisation."

In reviewing FDR's book Looking Forward, Mussolini said, "this man is one of us. The appeal to the decisiveness and masculine sobriety of the nation's youth, with which Roosevelt here calls his readers to battle, is reminiscent of the ways and means by which Fascism awakened the Italian people."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are several quotes from the Marquis de Custine's Russian Travel Journals, written in 1838:

"It was a gratuitous and automatic servility which did not exclude arrogance."

"The same people, have long, gloomy, tormented faces; they have a worried look. Their conversation is brief and their speech abrupt. I have concluded from this difference that a country which one leaves with so much joy and returns to with so much regret is a bad country."

"However little one speaks in Russia, one always speaks too much; since in this country all discourse is the expression of religious or political hypocrisy."

"Princes and peoples, like simple individuals, sometimes avenge themselves on innocents; they consider themselves strong because they have created victims."

"Russian despotism not only counts ideas and sentiments for nothing but remakes facts; it wages war on evidence and triumphs in the battle."

"The taste for reviews is pushed in Russia to the point of madness: and behold, even before entering this empire of military maneuvers I must attend a review on the water!... I am not moved to laughter; puerility on a grand scale is possible only under tyranny, of which it is perhaps the most terrible revelation!"

"... it is only with blindly submissive peoples that a ruler can demand immense sacrifices to produce trifles."

"This population of automatons is like half a game of checkers, for a single man makes all the plays and the invisible adversary is humanity."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian and Nathaniel Hale 1775, your quotes reminded me of someone even more severely harsh than Mussolini and the descriptions from the travel guide.

"The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation."

"The best way to destroy the capitalist system is to debauch the currency."

"There are no morals in politics; there is only expedience. A scoundrel may be of use to us just because he is a scoundrel."

"One man with a gun can control 100 without one."

"Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted."

"Comrades! The revolt by the five kulak volost's must be suppressed without mercy. The interest of the entire revolution demands this, because we have now before us our final decisive battle "with the kulaks." We need to set an example.

1) You need to hang (hang without fail, so that the public sees) at least 100 notorious kulaks, the rich, and the bloodsuckers.

2) Publish their names.

3) Take away all of their grain.

4) Execute the hostages - in accordance with yesterday's telegram.

This needs to be accomplished in such a way, that people for hundreds of miles around will see, tremble, know and scream out: let's choke and strangle those blood-sucking kulaks.

Telegraph us acknowledging receipt and execution of this. Yours, Lenin

P.S. Use your toughest people for this."

As you might have now figured out, the quotes are from Lenin the disgusting tyrant that had millions of people killed during his reign.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re Lenin: bottom-dwelling life-hater.

A fitting memorial to all such men, in the world to come, including Lenin, and Hitler, and Kant: let their portraits and, where applicable, a copy of their major works, be placed in the central incoming pipelines to, as a matter of principle, all of the world's sewage treatment facilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a more positive note:

"To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical." - Thomas Jefferson, 1779.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some thoughts about complexity. Einstein did not dismiss simplicity from understanding.

Albert Einstein - “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

Albert Einstein - “Since the mathematicians have invaded the theory of relativity, I do not understand it myself anymore.”

Albert Einstein - “Most of the fundamental ideas of science are essentially simple, and may, as a rule, be expressed in a language comprehensible to everyone.”

lbert Einstein - “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”

Albert Einstein - “The only real valuable thing is intuition.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hegel: The State is the self-certain absolute mind which regonizes no authority but its own, which acknowledges no abstract rules of good and bad, shameful and mean, cunning and deceit...The State is the ultimate end which has the highest right against the individual, whose highest duty is to be a member of the State.

Oxford Professor David Ritchie, 1891: The State has, as its end, the realization of the best life by the individual. The State is not a mere means to individual welfare; in a way, the State is an end to itself.

British professor A. R. Wadia, 1921: The citizen has a duty to perceive the State---or rather, to imagine the State---in the best possible light and always to presume that the State is innocent, regardless of how many million people it has killed.

John Dewey, after a 1930's visit to the Soviet Union: The people go about as if some mighty, oppressive load had been removed, as if they were newly awakened to the consciousness of released energies.

FDR, in his first inaugural address: We now realize that if we are to go forward, we must move as a trained and loyal army willing to sacrifice for the good of a common discipline...The day of enlightened administration has come.

Conservative writer Russell Kirk, in the 1950's: Government is a device of Divine wisdom to supply human wants.

JFK, 1963: The Federal Government is the people and the budget is a reflection of their need.

Hillary Clinton: Let us be willing to remold society by redefining what it means to be a human being.

Jean Jacques Rousseau, 1767: a lawgiver ought to feel himself capable of changing human nature, of transforming each individual into part of a greater whole from which he in a manner receives his life and being.. In a word, I want the property of the state to be as great amd powerful, and that of the citizens as small and weak, as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"In the conclusion of my speech, I said, ”that

our country was far from being in a condition

to make it necessary for us to humble ourselves

at the feet of Great Britain. We had lost a battle,

and a small island but the city and State of

New York were still in possession of their independence.

But suppose that State had been conquered,

suppose half the States in the Union had

been conquered – nay, suppose all the States in

the Union except one had been conquered, still

let not that one renounce her independence; but

I will go further,– should this solitary State, the

last repository of our freedom be invaded, let

her not survive her precious birthright, but in

yielding to superior force, let her last breath be

spent in uttering the word Independence.”

-Benjamin Rush in his Autobiography

"Mr.Wilkes condemned the measure and said Col.

– (whose name I do not recollect) had said he

could have dispersed the mob without firing a

gun. ”I have no doubt of it, – said Dr. Johnson.

Some men have a method of quelling riots,

which others have not, just as you have a

method of defending them which I have not.”

-Benjamin Rush in his Autobiography on an argument between Dr. Johnson and a one Mr. Wilkes observed by the author.

"Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Like a Colossus; and we petty men

Walk under his huge legs, and peep about

To find ourselves dishonourable graves.

Men at some time are masters of their fate:

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,

But in ourselves, that we are underlings."

-Cassius in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was listening to a Thomas Sowell interview and heard this line. It has interesting implications for the claims that we should let the Democrats win so that America can learn from it's mistakes...

Sometimes people will say, ‘It is just as well to let those guys get in there and discredit themselves, then we’ll win in the backlash.’ People said that when Hitler was rising in Germany. And many of those people that said that died in concentration camps. … There is such a thing as the point of no return.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Babe Ruth, in defiance of professional baseball's long tradition of player superstitions:

I have only one superstition. I touch all the bases when I hit a home run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Babe Ruth, in defiance of professional baseball's long tradition of player superstitions:

I have only one superstition. I touch all the bases when I hit a home run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I own to having a certain fondness for Lucifer. He rebelled against absolute power, as well.
-- Spoken by Hugh Kenrick, in SPARROWHAWK, Book Five: Revolution

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I own to having a certain fondness for Lucifer. He rebelled against absolute power, as well.
-- Spoken by Hugh Kenrick, in SPARROWHAWK, Book Five: Revolution

There, we have it in print, Objectivism is the philosophy of the devil! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

Loading...