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The-Top-Ten-Daily-Consequences-of-Having-Evolved

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Evolution

So, you think the human body is perfect?

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So, you think the human body is perfect?

We age and die from it, so from that perspective, it is certainly less than ideal. But that's why conceptual consciousness, which will eventually fix that problem, is the most powerful product of evolution.

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So, you think the human body is perfect?

We age and die from it, so from that perspective, it is certainly less than ideal. But that's why conceptual consciousness, which will eventually fix that problem, is the most powerful product of evolution.

Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

Not to me.

I'm very interested in the "software" myself and I'm currently writing a book to show people how to do induction correctly and efficiently. My aim is to help people use their minds more effectively.

As for the hardware, there are many physical interventions, from a cup of coffee in the morning to drugs that slow the progression of Alzheimer's, that are known to improve mental functioning. As we learn more about neurology, I expect new drugs and medical practices will repair damage to, and improve the functioning of, our mental hardware.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

Not to me.

I'm very interested in the "software" myself and I'm currently writing a book to show people how to do induction correctly and efficiently. My aim is to help people use their minds more effectively.

As for the hardware, there are many physical interventions, from a cup of coffee in the morning to drugs that slow the progression of Alzheimer's, that are known to improve mental functioning. As we learn more about neurology, I expect new drugs and medical practices will repair damage to, and improve the functioning of, our mental hardware.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

Not to me.

I'm very interested in the "software" myself and I'm currently writing a book to show people how to do induction correctly and efficiently. My aim is to help people use their minds more effectively.

As for the hardware, there are many physical interventions, from a cup of coffee in the morning to drugs that slow the progression of Alzheimer's, that are known to improve mental functioning. As we learn more about neurology, I expect new drugs and medical practices will repair damage to, and improve the functioning of, our mental hardware.

Do such things improve the mental functioning of our hardware? A healthy brain enables me to think, but it doesn't do the thinking. How does our hardware function, mentally? Consciousness does not experience the neurological processes that go on in the brain.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

Not to me.

I'm very interested in the "software" myself and I'm currently writing a book to show people how to do induction correctly and efficiently. My aim is to help people use their minds more effectively.

As for the hardware, there are many physical interventions, from a cup of coffee in the morning to drugs that slow the progression of Alzheimer's, that are known to improve mental functioning. As we learn more about neurology, I expect new drugs and medical practices will repair damage to, and improve the functioning of, our mental hardware.

Let us look at some facts. Our genes are what provide the fundamental organization of our brains. In different terms, we are born with a certain amount of neurons in the brain (about 100 billion which doubles by the age five) of which most we will never use or strengthen and which are weeded out later in life. Our experiences are what primarliy cause the neurons to create synaptic connections and strengthen themselves. It is estimated that an average adult's brain has 10 trillion neuro-synaptic connections which were not there at birth.

Man, as a species, is a volitional animal (nothing new to people here) that can choose what he wants to do with his life and hence his mind. It is the choosing of one's own values or lack thereof which allows us to create our own experiences. Over time, it is those experiences that create stronger neuro-synaptic connections which allow us to retain information, be good at certain actions and so on. But the brain has a large amount of plasticity which allows for a changing of our thoughts and actions which changes the strength of the neuro-synaptic connections. So, things like watching an irrational amount of TV can create a brain that is very weak at many other activities such as reasoning, comprehending, dealing with life in general, along with many other things. The good thing is that the statement "an old dog cannot learn new tricks" is totally false. There seems to be no age limit that a person cannot change although it gets more demanding the longer we apply the old habits.

So, knowing that the our genes play a certain part and one's experiences play a certain part and that there are limitations to what one can spend time on in a day, a week, a month, a year, a life-time, then there will be limits to how strong one's neuro-synaptic connections become even if a person fully integrates all of their knowledge. Can one out-run time? In other words, can one out-run aging? Can one focus on ten things at once? Can one focus on 1,000 things at once? To me, it sounds more like a religious epistemology than a rational objective epistemology.

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As for the hardware, there are many physical interventions, from a cup of coffee in the morning to drugs that slow the progression of Alzheimer's, that are known to improve mental functioning. As we learn more about neurology, I expect new drugs and medical practices will repair damage to, and improve the functioning of, our mental hardware.

Do such things improve the mental functioning of our hardware?

I know it has something to do with the function of various chemicals called neurotransmitters and their impact on physical states of the brain, but not much more. I'm no expert.

What I do know is that I can think much more clearly and with less effort after I have a morning cup of coffee to get my brain started.

A healthy brain enables me to think, but it doesn't do the thinking. How does our hardware function, mentally? Consciousness does not experience the neurological processes that go on in the brain.

We don't experience neurological processes but we can introspectively be aware of their effects. I can tell the difference in my cognitive functioning when I have a fever, need sleep, have too much wine, etc.

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Do you think that our conceptual consciousness will evolve in some way? If so, what might you imagine such a process to be?

In a sense it has evolved, and will continue to evolve, I think in two ways. The first is by "software" - understanding and implementing better thinking methods, including adoption of a better philosophy. The second is by "hardware" - improving brain physiology (or whatever artificial device can ultimately be made which can express consciousness) in order to provide better support for the operations of consciousness: better memory including an increased crow, faster cognition, enhanced sensory range, etc. Ultimately we can use our consciousness to speed up improvements in both of those areas rather than letting nature "take its course" over many generations.

Sounds like science-fiction.

Today's science-fiction is often tomorrow's science.

Evolution has biologically taken place by a long, slow process of 'random' mutation and natural selection. That doesn't mean that that is the only way possible. Human evolution has already been vastly sped up by what Phil calls the analogy of 'software'. Advancements made, inherited, passed on through education, and built upon with further advances in the last few centuries alone exponentially dwarf all that came before it. Now that modern biology is unlocking the nature of genetics, that science has the potential to make equivalent rapid process through genetic engineering to the analogy of 'hardware' in the human brain and nervous system -- meaning advancing the mental capacity of future generations just as some people have always been born with more capacity than the average. But we all know what the preconditions of that are and that it could be thwarted by a return to the Dark Ages.

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... Can one focus on ten things at once? Can one focus on 1,000 things at once? To me, it sounds more like a religious epistemology than a rational objective epistemology.

You mean you haven't heard of the kilo-crow?

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... Can one focus on ten things at once? Can one focus on 1,000 things at once? To me, it sounds more like a religious epistemology than a rational objective epistemology.

You mean you haven't heard of the kilo-crow?

Isn't that also called a Senate subcommittee?

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Ewv and others,

What do you think is going to happen if man figured out a way to add more than the 100 billion neurons to a new-born's brain at birth, or after for that matter? What would happen if the capacity increased and instead of having 200 billion neurons by the age of 5 we could have 400 billion neurons? How would any of this be able to overcome what one desires to think about and take actions on when it comes to building and strengthening neuro-synaptic connections? And even if one did keep the increased neurons after their teenage years, most of them would still have very weak connections with other neurons as the brain only strengthens that which we put time, thought and action into. In that context, the quality (capacity) means almost nothing, it is what one chooses to experience in their life-time that carries the most profoundness.

And let us not compartmentalize the effects of having more neurons and all the needed aspects of having a larger nervous system, such as; more blood vessels, more nerves, which of course demands more calories needed to fuel this more demanding nervous system, just to mention a few. The average human brain requires a minimal of 600 calories a day to function properly. If we are going to figure out how to increase the size of the brain and nervous system we will have to figure out a way to increase the strength of the digestive system to withstand all the extra, needed, calories to feed the brain, such as more nephrons within the kidneys.

But some people might say, wait, a higher metabolism is a good thing as it allows me to take in more calories, and my response would be yes. But let us not forget that every species that has a faster metabolism than man dies sooner than man in accordance to the percentage of increase. For example, the average bird has a metabolism (which also means a recuperation rate) 7 times faster than man. In different terms the average bird lives to be about 11 while humans live to be about 80.

But even all that I mentioned (which was not that much) cannot overcome the fact that our genes only lay out the basic frame. It is man's choices/experiences that create the neuro-synaptic connections which can only be created by focused thought about what we are sensing and experiencing. And changing one's genetic make-up will do close to nothing to increase one's free will as it is not one's genes that create and or strengthen the neuro-synaptic connections.

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--------

And changing one's genetic make-up will do close to nothing to increase one's free will as it is not one's genes that create and or strengthen the neuro-synaptic connections.

Excellent points.

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In that context, the quality (capacity) means almost nothing, it is what one chooses to experience in their life-time that carries the most profoundness.

The boldened from above should read quantity.

And thank you, Paul.

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