Laars

Aristotle's Laws of Logic

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Hello everybody,

For a school assignment (a pretty important one) I've to read a philosophers work. I came up with the idea to read Aristotle his epistomology (especially his laws of logic) because I'm now quite familiar with the Objectivist ethics, but the Objectivist epistomology is still a unwalked path for me, but one I certainly want to discover. My teacher thought it probably would be a big of a challenge for me, but since I like a challenge and Objectivism interests me the most, I decided to look more into it.

So, do any of you know a book where Aristotle's epistomology is well explained? I searched on amazon.co.uk, but I wasn't able to find a useable one. I'd hope that you could help me.

P.S. I'm not planning onto spending more then 15 Euro's on this book (shipping included)

P.P.S This is my third year having philosophy as a class and I read five of Rand her books (also books from other philosophers), so, do you think I'm able to fully understand and explain Aristotle's epistomology? If not, do you have another good suggestion for what subject I should use?

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Aristotle's epistemology is broader than his logic, which is in turn broader than his rules of deduction. If you don't understand parts of his metaphysics and epistemology you won't get the full significance of his rules of logic. You could understand it but it is a big topic and Aristotle himself is hard to read.

A good summary is in the lectures on Aristotle in Leonard Peikoff's recorded course on the History of Western Philosophy, but that is very expensive. He also gave a series just on logic, also expensive. Without his approach as a guide you would have trouble philosophically properly understanding other accounts, although you could understand the techmical rules of syllogisms themselves from a good classical logic book, like Ruby's 1960 Logic, An Introduction. But you have to be very careful what logic book you read, what the philosophical aspects in any book are (including Ruby's), and to stay away from (for now) 'modern' logic or mathematical logic, which is not Aristotelian in nature and is even more technical.

Even classical, Aristotelian deductive logic is a big and technical topic and you would be better off from the point of view of both philosophical understanding and the scope of your assignment to understand the metaphysical and epistemological basis of it and a few of the basic rules first -- which leads you around a circle since you don't have the time or money to pursue that properly. It's hard to advise you what to do without knowing a lot more about your current knowledge and the scope of the assignment, which isn't possible here. How much effort you put into investigating, selecting and defining the scope of your project depends on how much time you have, so it might be better to pick something narrower which you already know something about to get started.

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