Betsy Speicher

Atlas Shrugged: Part I (2011)

31 posts in this topic

Related: The question is: Who can come up to her standards. A question is who will accept her standards?

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I received a copy of the movie for Christmas and have watched it a couple of times. I am disappointed with many of the same issues noted above. But I have had conversations with a number of people, regarding the movie, who had not read anything by Ayn Rand. The reaction is uniformly supportive of the basic view presented, even as presented in the movie. The rumination posted above reflects the hope that people being presented the issue(s) by the movie will go on to read the book and begin to take even small actions in their lives, including their political lives, to realize the values behind the book and the movie. If the movie precipitates that, it will be worth while.

I can't say how many big and little disappointments I have with the movie as is, so far. But it is not worthless; and nobody else in 55 years has been able to get it done.

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(my 1st post on The Forum)

I think the movie was sound, as far as it went - as far as it could go in limited time. The train over the bridge was an impressive special effect. I have to say, I find Dagney's acting to be pretty flat. I'm hoping that this progresses the way Star Wars did - they got so much better as the newer ones came out.

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(my 1st post on The Forum)

I think the movie was sound, as far as it went - as far as it could go in limited time. The train over the bridge was an impressive special effect. I have to say, I find Dagney's acting to be pretty flat. I'm hoping that this progresses the way Star Wars did - they got so much better as the newer ones came out.

Don't bet your infant child's milk money on that.

ruveyn

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Just watched version 3 (Special Edition), and was impressed by the short comments from producer John Aglialoro in the extras. I believe too much was expected of this movie; one cannot duplicate a book like this in a few hours.

There have been some valid criticisms above, but one needs to keep perspective. The movie puts the book before people who may never read the book, and it helps bring it into the mainstream. My main criticism is about the rapid exchange of dialog; as if each person can't wait for his turn to speak. However, this is a problem that plagues most films these days.

One needs time to process what one hears, and much more could be conveyed with less words and longer pauses. I could hardly keep up, even with the help of subtitles and having read the book. This is one place where "less is more" needs to be considered.

Sometimes a few words can replace a thousand pictures. A few words in the beginning; "the nation was falling apart" would help put the initial sequence of flashing scenes into context. The whole thing needs to be slowed down because the important thing is to get the message across, not just 'out'.

All said, I was happy to see this, and think it was positive and enjoyable.

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Well, I finally saw Atlas Shrugged: Part 1.

I can't say I was disappointed. I wasn't expecting very much at all.

The whole damned thing looked like a TV show. It did not seem like watching a big-budget style Hollywood Romantic epic like Gone With the Wind. Also, it really bothers me that a single, great novel is being split up into three movies. And now I hear that the makers of Part 2 are changing all the actors and actresses! Can this be true?

As for the drama and quality of the filmmaking: an adaptation of Ayn Rand's novel deserves a director with the artistic abilities of Fritz Lang or D.W. Griffith, even Victor Fleming (Gone With the Wind) or Robert Wise. And speaking of Wise, The Day the Earth Stood Still, which he directed, has some Atlas Shrugged-like qualities to it (even though that film is, in a way, a liberal plug for the U.N.). Klaatu, in one part of the movie, makes his own statement to the whole world, in words and in action, that changes things forever. And the scene where he quietly enters the boarding house and is suddenly seen in shadow should give a hint as to how the scene in Atlas Shrugged when Dagny is in her temporary office and sees the silhouette of a mysterious figure outside her door, reaching to turn the doorknob and then deciding not to, should be filmed.

Another thing that I don't like is that evidently we will not hear Halley's Concerto. Maybe it's because film producers don't believe a concerto could be composed for a film. But as I believe I've said somewhere else on this forum, a concerto has been composed for at least one picture in the past--Dangerous Moonlight, with Anton Walbrook. Richard Adensell wrote his "Warsaw Concerto" specifically for that movie.

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