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Lighter and stronger steel, done quick

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Inventor Gary Cola has apparently demonstrated the validity of his claims regarding his new process for making lighter and stronger steel, and doing it very fast: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/...10609173718.htm

Hopefully it's as good as it sounds.

While the article sounds interesting, it is very slight on details. Bainite formation has been known since the 1920s and its hardening/strengthening effect is well known. The article does not say 7% stronger than which heat treatment or which alloy. There are dozens of heat treatments for steel that will harden/strengthen it. I couldn't tell if this is a new effect or if it is a result of the fact that metallurgy hasn't been taught in universities for over a generation.

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Inventor Gary Cola has apparently demonstrated the validity of his claims regarding his new process for making lighter and stronger steel, and doing it very fast: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/...10609173718.htm

Hopefully it's as good as it sounds.

While the article sounds interesting, it is very slight on details. Bainite formation has been known since the 1920s and its hardening/strengthening effect is well known. The article does not say 7% stronger than which heat treatment or which alloy. There are dozens of heat treatments for steel that will harden/strengthen it. I couldn't tell if this is a new effect or if it is a result of the fact that metallurgy hasn't been taught in universities for over a generation.

I agree, let's remember the medic who reinvented integration: http://fliptomato.wordpress.com/2007/03/19...s-75-citations/

But hey, at least you feel GOOD when you come out top quartile just like the rest of the class!

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... let's remember the medic who reinvented integration: http://fliptomato.wordpress.com/2007/03/19...s-75-citations/

The claim in that article that he reinvented "integration" gives him too much credit. From the description there it appears that he didn't get anywhere near anything that could be considered as calculus. He "reinvented" a simple method that Archimides had far surpassed in ancient Greece with his pre-calculus method of exhaustion.

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... or if it is a result of the fact that metallurgy hasn't been taught in universities for over a generation.

It isn't generally taught anymore at all? Aren't there still engineering departments of metallurgy or materials science? Google 'metallurgy site:mit.edu' and you will find several courses there, including a couple with free online access.

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... or if it is a result of the fact that metallurgy hasn't been taught in universities for over a generation.

It isn't generally taught anymore at all? Aren't there still engineering departments of metallurgy or materials science? Google 'metallurgy site:mit.edu' and you will find several courses there, including a couple with free online access.

Individual courses, usually in Materials Science. But very few specialize in metallurgy anymore. Engineers today now about more plastics, elastomers, and composites but not much about metals and alloys beyond those one or two courses.

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Most of the research in metals, these days, is centered on their magnetic properties. For very strong light weight material, composites are the way to go.

ruveyn

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Individual courses, usually in Materials Science. But very few specialize in metallurgy anymore. Engineers today now about more plastics, elastomers, and composites but not much about metals and alloys beyond those one or two courses.

I disagree. In my general engineering course's material science class I spent 2 years with specialist steel classes (compulsory) and memorized the composition of a dozen or so alloy steels. In fact the first thing undergrads did when they arrived was design a steel bridge and test it to destruction with the highest resistance/$$ spent ratio gaining top marks and a prize (Chinese students easily beat the rest of the class when their bridge, which was the cheapest, withstood 3x as much as the 2nd best - guess the two years of undergrad preparation at Shanghai University paid off).

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Most of the research in metals, these days, is centered on their magnetic properties. For very strong light weight material, composites are the way to go.

Do Rearden composites have a greenish-blue tinge?

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... In my general engineering course's material science class I spent 2 years with specialist steel classes (compulsory) and memorized the composition of a dozen or so alloy steels...

What did "general engineering" mean there?

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Most of the research in metals, these days, is centered on their magnetic properties. For very strong light weight material, composites are the way to go.

Do Rearden composites have a greenish-blue tinge?

Rearden Composites? Are there any such things. I though Rearden Metal was a plot McGuffin in -Atlas Shrugged-.

There is active research on creating mono filament materials of very high tensile strength. Carbon based fibres seem to be where the action is.

Non-metallic filaments are capable of extremely high tensile strength. An example from nature: spider webs. Stronger than steel, much, much lighter. Clearly spiders cannot produce the quantity of fiber and the length needed but that show the way toward high strength synthetics. You might find the following of interest: http://web.mit.edu/course/3/3.91/www/slides/cunniff.pdf

As to metals, there is much research in producing alloys with useful magnetic properties. Also rare-earths can be made with magnetic properties. See your refrigerator. There are probably dozens of such items stuck on your refrigerator which is made with ferro-magnetic cladding. Here is a book (intended for a popular audience, but still rather thorough in its coverage):

"Driving Force: The Natural Magic of Magnets" by James D. Livingston. It has very clear explanation of how magnetic domains form in metals. Also a good chapter on MRI devices. Livingston was an applied physicist who worked for GE. and development of He is now a senior lecturer in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT.

ruveyn

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Individual courses, usually in Materials Science. But very few specialize in metallurgy anymore. Engineers today now about more plastics, elastomers, and composites but not much about metals and alloys beyond those one or two courses.

I disagree. In my general engineering course's material science class I spent 2 years with specialist steel classes (compulsory) and memorized the composition of a dozen or so alloy steels. In fact the first thing undergrads did when they arrived was design a steel bridge and test it to destruction with the highest resistance/$$ spent ratio gaining top marks and a prize (Chinese students easily beat the rest of the class when their bridge, which was the cheapest, withstood 3x as much as the 2nd best - guess the two years of undergrad preparation at Shanghai University paid off).

Not sure what you're disagreeing with. Going to a Chinese school to learn metallurgy emphasizes my point that there are not that many majoring in metallurgy any more.

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Most of the research in metals, these days, is centered on their magnetic properties. For very strong light weight material, composites are the way to go.

Do Rearden composites have a greenish-blue tinge?

Depends upon which composites you mean. There are organic based composites (epoxy and carbon), metal composites and ceramic composites. Other than metals, greenish blue is not typical of other composites. Usually, heat tints of copper alloys have that color. Some stainless steels can be given a bluish tint.

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Inventor Gary Cola has apparently demonstrated the validity of his claims regarding his new process for making lighter and stronger steel, and doing it very fast: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/...10609173718.htm

Hopefully it's as good as it sounds.

It is good to hear that an amateur can make a dent in technology, which is heavily dominated by universities and government funded research organization. The idea of the gifted inventor in has garage takes us back to the bracing times of Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla.

At one time all the inventors were amateurs. When the business of Making New Stuff was institutionalized something was lost.

ruveyn

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