Jim A.

Favorite movie lines

19 posts in this topic

I am a lover of dialogue in films (or the few plays I've seen). Sometimes it's because of the philosophical message of the line, sometimes simply the phrasing and sometimes the fact that one or two words were uttered at a certain time in a certain scene.

My favorites are:

After Gail Wynand (Raymond Massey) in The Fountainhead says: "You know, one day Mister Toohey you'll bore me," Toohey (Robert Douglas) says: "I shall endeavour not to do so until the right time."

When Dekkard (Harrison Ford) in Blade Runner (an otherwise pretty lousy movie, in my view) asks Bryant (M. Emmet Walsh) why he doesn't send a man named Holden to go to the Tyrell Corporation and test an employee to see if he's an android--and a dangerous one--he responds: "We did. He can breathe okay as long as no one unplugs him."

From the same film: When Chu (James Hong) says to Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer), who is an android, that he manufactured Batty's eyes, Batty says to him: "Chu, if only you could see what I've seen with your eyes."

From Lawrenece of Arabia: When Lawrence's friend, played by Omar Sharif, says that "it is written" (in the Koran, evidently) that Lawrence cannot go back into the desert they just crossed to rescue another friend and fellow warrior, Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) replies: "Nothing is written!" A magnificent statement of free will.

In the "OBIT" episode of the Outer Limits television series of the sixties, a Senator (Peter Breck) investigating the existence and use of a computer, called OBIT, that can focus on anyone, anywhere and invade that person's privacy, is told by a man named Lomax (Jeff Corey) who has helped to install and run the machines on a military base that no one who hasn't done or said anything wrong has anything to fear from OBIT, he responds: "Are you that perfect, Mr. Lomax?"

In The Magnificent Seven, Chris (Yul Brynner), a hired gun, is approached by three men from a small Mexican village who want help defending their village from forty marauders led by Calvera (Eli Wallach). Chris tells them: "You know what this means when you start something like this, don't you? You must be prepared for killing, and more killing. And still more killing until the reason for it is gone." (Which should have been this country's motto right after 9/11).

From the same film: An eloquent, if philosophically false, line spoken by the villain, Calvera, in reference to the seeming timidity of the villagers: "If God didn't want them sheared, he wouldn't have made them sheep."

In Gorky Park, Renko (William Hurt), a Soviet police officer, comes to his superior's office to report on some dead bodies, whose faces were removed, that were found in Gorky Park. He appears before his boss without having shaved. The police general notes that Renko is not clean-shaven. He then asks Renko for a description of the corpses. Renko concludes with: "They were clean-shaven, Comrade General, quite literally."

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Agent Smith: "Why, why, WHY do you persist, Mr. Anderson?"

Neo: "Because I choose to."

- The Matrix Revolutions

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V: Violence can be used for good.

Evey Hammond: What are you talking about?

V: Justice.

- V for Vendetta

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I am a lover of dialogue in films (or the few plays I've seen). Sometimes it's because of the philosophical message of the line, sometimes simply the phrasing and sometimes the fact that one or two words were uttered at a certain time in a certain scene.

My favorites are:

After Gail Wynand (Raymond Massey) in The Fountainhead says: "You know, one day Mister Toohey you'll bore me," Toohey (Robert Douglas) says: "I shall endeavour not to do so until the right time."

When Dekkard (Harrison Ford) in Blade Runner (an otherwise pretty lousy movie, in my view) asks Bryant (M. Emmet Walsh) why he doesn't send a man named Holden to go to the Tyrell Corporation and test an employee to see if he's an android--and a dangerous one--he responds: "We did. He can breathe okay as long as no one unplugs him."

From the same film: When Chu (James Hong) says to Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer), who is an android, that he manufactured Batty's eyes, Batty says to him: "Chu, if only you could see what I've seen with your eyes."

From Lawrenece of Arabia: When Lawrence's friend, played by Omar Sharif, says that "it is written" (in the Koran, evidently) that Lawrence cannot go back into the desert they just crossed to rescue another friend and fellow warrior, Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) replies: "Nothing is written!" A magnificent statement of free will.

In the "OBIT" episode of the Outer Limits television series of the sixties, a Senator (Peter Breck) investigating the existence and use of a computer, called OBIT, that can focus on anyone, anywhere and invade that person's privacy, is told by a man named Lomax (Jeff Corey) who has helped to install and run the machines on a military base that no one who hasn't done or said anything wrong has anything to fear from OBIT, he responds: "Are you that perfect, Mr. Lomax?"

In The Magnificent Seven, Chris (Yul Brynner), a hired gun, is approached by three men from a small Mexican village who want help defending their village from forty marauders led by Calvera (Eli Wallach). Chris tells them: "You know what this means when you start something like this, don't you? You must be prepared for killing, and more killing. And still more killing until the reason for it is gone." (Which should have been this country's motto right after 9/11).

From the same film: An eloquent, if philosophically false, line spoken by the villain, Calvera, in reference to the seeming timidity of the villagers: "If God didn't want them sheared, he wouldn't have made them sheep."

In Gorky Park, Renko (William Hurt), a Soviet police officer, comes to his superior's office to report on some dead bodies, whose faces were removed, that were found in Gorky Park. He appears before his boss without having shaved. The police general notes that Renko is not clean-shaven. He then asks Renko for a description of the corpses. Renko concludes with: "They were clean-shaven, Comrade General, quite literally."

Very good choices, these. Thanks for sharing.

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So. Many. Choices.

Sometimes my kids and I communicate entirely in movie quotes. I'll pick a few now and add more over time.

Cambridge Dean 1: It is said that you use a personal coach.

Cambridge University Dean 2: The university believes that the way of the amateur is the only one to provide satisfactory results.

Harold Abrahams: You know, gentlemen, you yearn for victory, just as I do, but achieved with the apparent effortlessness of gods. Yours are the archaic values of the prep school playground. You deceive no one buy yourselves. I believe in the pursuit of excellence, and I’ll carry the future with me.

Peter Venkman: Back off, man. I'm a scientist.

I think Ghostbusters has a very rational outlook. Even blasts the EPA.

Shepherd Book: Captain, do you mind if I say grace?

Malcolm Reynolds: Only if you say it out loud.

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That's good, Red; that scene from Cyrano has a number of great lines. It's no wonder it was Ayn Rand's favorite play (and she having written a few plays herself).

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Speaking of Tombstone:

Turkey Creek Jack Johnson: "Why you doin' this, Doc?"

Doc Holliday: "Because Wyatt Earp is my friend."

Turkey Creek Jack Johnson: "Friend? Hell, I got lots of friends."

Doc Holliday: "...I don't."

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"I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse"

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Principal Mangosuthu: And that concludes field day at the United Nations School. Like the real UN, there was a lot of heated gibberish but nothing was accomplished. And we send the bill to Uncle Sam. Ha ha ha ha!

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I remembered the following quote from Beautiful Girls as I posted pics of Claudia Bassols here :

Paul: Supermodels are beautiful girls, Will. A beautiful girl can make you dizzy, like you've been drinking Jack and Coke all morning. She can make you feel high full of the single greatest commodity known to man - promise. Promise of a better day. Promise of a greater hope. Promise of a new tomorrow. This particular aura can be found in the gait of a beautiful girl. In her smile, in her soul, the way she makes every rotten little thing about life seem like it's going to be okay. The supermodels, Willy? That's all they are. Bottled promise. Scenes from a brand new day. Hope dancing in stiletto heels.

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I remembered the following quote from Beautiful Girls as I posted pics of Claudia Bassols here :
Paul: Supermodels are beautiful girls, Will. A beautiful girl can make you dizzy, like you've been drinking Jack and Coke all morning. She can make you feel high full of the single greatest commodity known to man - promise. Promise of a better day. Promise of a greater hope. Promise of a new tomorrow. This particular aura can be found in the gait of a beautiful girl. In her smile, in her soul, the way she makes every rotten little thing about life seem like it's going to be okay. The supermodels, Willy? That's all they are. Bottled promise. Scenes from a brand new day. Hope dancing in stiletto heels.

It's not a great movie, but for some odd reason, I've seen that movie maybe four times. If it's on and I happen to catch it, I usually finish it. Michael Rapaport delivers those lines in a goofy but memorable way. I agree with the sentiment, too. :)

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It's not a great movie, but for some odd reason, I've seen that movie maybe four times.

Here's a guess at the "odd reason" . . .

umathurmanrolexvoguejune2006us.jpg

(Uma Thurman.)

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That's good, Red; that scene from Cyrano has a number of great lines. It's no wonder it was Ayn Rand's favorite play (and she having written a few plays herself).

It was? I vaguely remember her mentioning it but didn't know it was her favorite play. She had great taste. :)

I first saw the movie with Gerard Depardieu back when I still only reached a couple of apples high. I was watching TV late one night when it came on. I don't know how on earth I sat through a whole movie about romance - in french. But I did, and it's one of my favorites too.

Speaking of Tombstone:

Turkey Creek Jack Johnson: "Why you doin' this, Doc?"

Doc Holliday: "Because Wyatt Earp is my friend."

Turkey Creek Jack Johnson: "Friend? Hell, I got lots of friends."

Doc Holliday: "...I don't."

That's a great one too!

Here's one from The Dark Knight:

Alfred Pennyworth: A long time ago, I was in Burma, my friends and I were working for the local government. They were trying to buy the loyalty of tribal leaders by bribing them with precious stones. But their caravans were being raided in a forest north of Rangoon by a bandit. So we went looking for the stones. But in six months, we never found anyone who traded with him. One day I saw a child playing with a ruby the size of a tangerine. The bandit had been throwing them away.

Bruce Wayne: Then why steal them?

Alfred Pennyworth: Because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

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It's not a great movie, but for some odd reason, I've seen that movie maybe four times.

Here's a guess at the "odd reason" . . .

umathurmanrolexvoguejune2006us.jpg

(Uma Thurman.)

:)

I thought Uma Thurman was special when she first came into reckoning. I still think she's an uncommon beauty, but, I was never a big, big fan of hers.

I think I was drawn to the story, but I would have to take the time to list the reasons.

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Here's one from The Dark Knight:

Alfred Pennyworth: A long time ago, I was in Burma, my friends and I were working for the local government. They were trying to buy the loyalty of tribal leaders by bribing them with precious stones. But their caravans were being raided in a forest north of Rangoon by a bandit. So we went looking for the stones. But in six months, we never found anyone who traded with him. One day I saw a child playing with a ruby the size of a tangerine. The bandit had been throwing them away.

Bruce Wayne: Then why steal them?

Alfred Pennyworth: Because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

I love this exchange from The Dark Knight. One of the few (what stood out to me as) explicitly philosophical dialogues in the movie, which is such a rarity for any movie these days, V for Vendetta being a fantastic exception. Here's another one from The Dark Knight:

The Joker: You didn't think I'd risk losing the battle for Gotham's soul in a fistfight with you? No. You need an ace in the hole. Mine's Harvey.

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Tom Hanks (Joe) to Abe Vigoda (the chief of the Waponi, hoping ahero will come and save them): "I'm my best hope for a hero."

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Lt. Dave to Sgt. Bert in The Blob, when the Blob has covered the diner and Bert is aiming at the over-head power lines to shoot it down and electrocute the Blob: "Try not to miss."

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Cambridge Dean 1: It is said that you use a personal coach.

Cambridge University Dean 2: The university believes that the way of the amateur is the only one to provide satisfactory results.

Harold Abrahams: You know, gentlemen, you yearn for victory, just as I do, but achieved with the apparent effortlessness of gods. Yours are the archaic values of the prep school playground. You deceive no one but yourselves. I believe in the pursuit of excellence, and I'll carry the future with me.

After which the dean (who was an anti-semite) said:

There goes your Semite, Hugh.: Different mountain, different God.

ruveyn

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