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Descendant of Somebody Famous?

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I'm a descendent of Ethan Allen. I never really cared much about it. But, lately I've been learning a little about him. With some of his anti-establishment traits...I find myself saying, "So that's where I got it." Some of the parallels are surprising.

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I'm the great-great-granddaughter of Jacob Schiff, the (in)famous financier and philanthropist (link).

Several of my ancestors were horse-thieves which explains why I am so high-strung.

ruveyn

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I'm a descendent of Ethan Allen. I never really cared much about it. But, lately I've been learning a little about him. With some of his anti-establishment traits...I find myself saying, "So that's where I got it." Some of the parallels are surprising.

You didn't get anything from him. You are what you make of yourself by your own choices.

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I'm a descendant of Adam and Eve, and Noah!!

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My family has quite a bit of our heritage documented, in family Bibles, and stories and the like. Recently I have tried to capture some of it, and dug out more research online. There's a number of famous people, and certain branches can be traced back a very long time because of the research others have done on them, but it's just as often the unheard of people I am more interested in. I've found it fascinating to look in to why people made certain decisions. Why did this family come to America when it did? Why did this family leave this other country when it did? What made a family move further west vs stay and commit to building a town? What pressures did this group find themselves under? I think especially now in these times as we are considering the same things I've been drawn to the stories of their lives.

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I'm a descendant of Adam and Eve, and Noah!!

Who was your ancestor's partner on the ark?

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I'm a descendant of Adam and Eve, and Noah!!

Who was your ancestor's partner on the ark?

Not sure of Noah's wife's name.

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I'm a descendant of Adam and Eve, and Noah!!

Who was your ancestor's partner on the ark?

Not sure of Noah's wife's name.

According to the TNKH (Hebrew Bible) Noah's wife was named Eshet Noach which translated means Mrs. Noach. So I guess her first name was Missus.

ruveuyn

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I'm a descendent of Ethan Allen. I never really cared much about it. But, lately I've been learning a little about him. With some of his anti-establishment traits...I find myself saying, "So that's where I got it." Some of the parallels are surprising.

You didn't get anything from him. You are what you make of yourself by your own choices.

Thank God - because I'm also related to Gumby.

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I'm a descendant of Adam and Eve, and Noah!!

Who was your ancestor's partner on the ark?

Not sure of Noah's wife's name.

According to the TNKH (Hebrew Bible) Noah's wife was named Eshet Noach which translated means Mrs. Noach. So I guess her first name was Missus.

ruveuyn

That's how I read it. Noah Zark and his wife, Mrs. Zark.

Either her parents never gave her a name, or they and Noah always got her attention with "Hey! You!" Unfortunate for Mrs. Zark that she really she was stuck with the only man left on Earth. (Although the bible never makes that clear; there were apparently many people alive after the flood. God's event planner only had the budget for a local event. Or, maybe, he wasnt' all that angry, just a little annoyed)

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That's how I read it. Noah Zark and his wife, Mrs. Zark.

Either her parents never gave her a name, or they and Noah always got her attention with "Hey! You!" Unfortunate for Mrs. Zark that she really she was stuck with the only man left on Earth. (Although the bible never makes that clear; there were apparently many people alive after the flood. God's event planner only had the budget for a local event. Or, maybe, he wasnt' all that angry, just a little annoyed)

It left out the nearby submarine with all the other people and which Noah couldn't see. If Paul isn't related to one of the animals on the ark he may be a descendant through the original Captain Nemo. Either way, he made his own character and is completely free of inherited original sin.

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I have a real problem with people who are seriously interested in researching their genealogy. I don't mean like just finding out a few things about one's origins, I mean people who are almost addicted to learning their genealogy thoroughly.

You've probably heard the expression, applied to "inherited characteristics": "You can't take the credit if you can't take the blame." What should you say to people who ask you about your ancestor, Ludwig van Beethoven, when you find you also are descended from Adolf Hitler? Only: "Other than genes, they ultimately have nothing to do with me and who I am. I have everything to do with that." I believe that genealogy addicts--other than those who want medical information about their biological background--want either to elevate their own stature by taking credit for what their ancestors did (to "lean" on "dead kin", in Badger Clark's words from the poem "The Westerner"), or to find an excuse for their own evil by finding some criminal in their lineage, so they can say: "See? My ancestor robbed banks and killed people, so the things I've done are excusable. I can't help being what my genes have made me."

P.S. My first roommate after leaving home--practically the first person I came across in ads looking for a roommate--was a descendant of Rudolf Hess. And he was proud of it! Which didn't surprise me; the guy was a complete and total racist jerk, among other things.

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I have a real problem with people who are seriously interested in researching their genealogy. I don't mean like just finding out a few things about one's origins, I mean people who are almost addicted to learning their genealogy thoroughly.

You've probably heard the expression, applied to "inherited characteristics": "You can't take the credit if you can't take the blame." What should you say to people who ask you about your ancestor, Ludwig van Beethoven, when you find you also are descended from Adolf Hitler? Only: "Other than genes, they ultimately have nothing to do with me and who I am. I have everything to do with that." I believe that genealogy addicts--other than those who want medical information about their biological background--want either to elevate their own stature by taking credit for what their ancestors did (to "lean" on "dead kin", in Badger Clark's words from the poem "The Westerner"), or to find an excuse for their own evil by finding some criminal in their lineage, so they can say: "See? My ancestor robbed banks and killed people, so the things I've done are excusable. I can't help being what my genes have made me."

P.S. My first roommate after leaving home--practically the first person I came across in ads looking for a roommate--was a descendant of Rudolf Hess. And he was proud of it! Which didn't surprise me; the guy was a complete and total racist jerk, among other things.

There are some legitimate uses, such as finding inherited diseases, or having a better chance of living long. But even with that knowledge, many factors affect one's life. One's inheritance does not dictate only indicates.

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Having been adopted in a time when all adoptions were closed, I have absolutely no idea what my genetic lineage is. It's not something that it would ever even occur to me to look into, though - I've always known I was adopted and I've never cared to find my birth parents. The only time it matters is when a doctor asks for medical history; I always have to answer, "I got nuthin'."

On a positive note, I can now officially "Baconize" myself with any actor, having performed in one brief scene of a television pilot with Kelli Giddish, who replaced Mariska Hargitay on Law and Order: Special Victims Unit and has appeared in various films. :) (I also had a tiny role in All's Faire, in which Kelli is credited, although we didn't appear in any scenes together. Also, she was replaced and does not appear in the released version.) There's a Baconization web site, but I can't be found there. :) With my link to Kelli, my "Bacon number" is 3.

Is it wrong that I know more about my Baconizibility than my lineage?

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That's how I read it. Noah Zark and his wife, Mrs. Zark.

Either her parents never gave her a name, or they and Noah always got her attention with "Hey! You!" Unfortunate for Mrs. Zark that she really she was stuck with the only man left on Earth. (Although the bible never makes that clear; there were apparently many people alive after the flood. God's event planner only had the budget for a local event. Or, maybe, he wasnt' all that angry, just a little annoyed)

It left out the nearby submarine with all the other people and which Noah couldn't see. If Paul isn't related to one of the animals on the ark he may be a descendant through the original Captain Nemo. Either way, he made his own character and is completely free of inherited original sin.

Submarine? The first sub was in the 1800's. Not sure about being related to animals. I do like bananas and corn on the cob. Yes, never had a trace of original sin. Not in the Jewish tradition.

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It left out the nearby submarine with all the other people and which Noah couldn't see. If Paul isn't related to one of the animals on the ark he may be a descendant through the original Captain Nemo. Either way, he made his own character and is completely free of inherited original sin.

Submarine? The first sub was in the 1800's. Not sure about being related to animals. I do like bananas and corn on the cob. Yes, never had a trace of original sin. Not in the Jewish tradition.

Yes there was a submarine. That's why Noah didn't see all the other people. Biblical reporting of dates for the ark, etc. have always been squirrely.

As for the animal ancestors touring on the ark (or the sub), it could have been this fellow, which explains the bananas (but they hadn't yet discovered corn in the New World on the other side of the flat earth):

Australopithecus_afarensis.jpg

Noah "Nemo" S. Here

great, great, ..., great grandfather of cousin Paul

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Having been adopted in a time when all adoptions were closed, I have absolutely no idea what my genetic lineage is... Is it wrong that I know more about my Baconizibility than my lineage?

Presumably you at least know that it's human? But it's hard to tell from your photo.

avatar90x90.jpg

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I have a real problem with people who are seriously interested in researching their genealogy. I don't mean like just finding out a few things about one's origins, I mean people who are almost addicted to learning their genealogy thoroughly.

You've probably heard the expression, applied to "inherited characteristics": "You can't take the credit if you can't take the blame." What should you say to people who ask you about your ancestor, Ludwig van Beethoven, when you find you also are descended from Adolf Hitler? Only: "Other than genes, they ultimately have nothing to do with me and who I am. I have everything to do with that." I believe that genealogy addicts--other than those who want medical information about their biological background--want either to elevate their own stature by taking credit for what their ancestors did (to "lean" on "dead kin", in Badger Clark's words from the poem "The Westerner"), or to find an excuse for their own evil by finding some criminal in their lineage, so they can say: "See? My ancestor robbed banks and killed people, so the things I've done are excusable. I can't help being what my genes have made me."

If you frame it as an "addiction" then it's hard to justify anything. But a serious interest could also be explained as curiosity about connections with people you are close to, who was close to them previously, etc., and what they were all like and what their lives were like; curiosity about where geographically and culturally you came from in history and how you got here; and as Nemo Jr. mentions, a desire to learn medical history. Wouldn't it be interesting if you discovered that you or an ancestor came in on the crash of '47 at Roswell? But if that kind of background begins to serve as a sense of self worth it's a bad substitute for it and a form of racism.

P.S. My first roommate after leaving home--practically the first person I came across in ads looking for a roommate--was a descendant of Rudolf Hess. And he was proud of it! Which didn't surprise me; the guy was a complete and total racist jerk, among other things.

Did he play the piano?

There are some legitimate uses, such as finding inherited diseases, or having a better chance of living long. But even with that knowledge, many factors affect one's life. One's inheritance does not dictate only indicates.

Yes, like bananas.

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There are some legitimate uses, such as finding inherited diseases, or having a better chance of living long. But even with that knowledge, many factors affect one's life. One's inheritance does not dictate only indicates.

There are other reasons genealogy can be a valid value. One of my cousins did a genealogy chart for a family celebration and I followed up on some fascinating family history as a result. I learned, among other things, that three of my great-aunts lived to be over 100 and that many of my ancestors had led very adventurous lives.

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I grew up with General Patton's great grandson (if I remember that correctly). I always liked the line, "And when you put your hand in some kind of goo, that five minutes ago was your best friend's face...you'll know what to do." I don't know if Patton actually said that but if he did, he's my kind of guy. :)

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There are some legitimate uses, such as finding inherited diseases, or having a better chance of living long. But even with that knowledge, many factors affect one's life. One's inheritance does not dictate only indicates.

There are other reasons genealogy can be a valid value. One of my cousins did a genealogy chart for a family celebration and I followed up on some fascinating family history as a result. I learned, among other things, that three of my great-aunts lived to be over 100 and that many of my ancestors had led very adventurous lives.

You may have the genetic inheritance for a long healthy life span.

ruveyn

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There are some legitimate uses, such as finding inherited diseases, or having a better chance of living long. But even with that knowledge, many factors affect one's life. One's inheritance does not dictate only indicates.

There are other reasons genealogy can be a valid value. One of my cousins did a genealogy chart for a family celebration and I followed up on some fascinating family history as a result. I learned, among other things, that three of my great-aunts lived to be over 100 and that many of my ancestors had led very adventurous lives.

Yes, but the value comes after the knowledge that their lives were adventurous. Life is an adventure, and one's family's history can be like a good story. Had you found nothing interesting or criminals in your family, how much value would you attach to your geneology?

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It left out the nearby submarine with all the other people and which Noah couldn't see. If Paul isn't related to one of the animals on the ark he may be a descendant through the original Captain Nemo. Either way, he made his own character and is completely free of inherited original sin.

Submarine? The first sub was in the 1800's. Not sure about being related to animals. I do like bananas and corn on the cob. Yes, never had a trace of original sin. Not in the Jewish tradition.

Yes there was a submarine. That's why Noah didn't see all the other people. Biblical reporting of dates for the ark, etc. have always been squirrely.

As for the animal ancestors touring on the ark (or the sub), it could have been this fellow, which explains the bananas (but they hadn't yet discovered corn in the New World on the other side of the flat earth):

Australopithecus_afarensis.jpg

Noah "Nemo" S. Here

great, great, ..., great grandfather of cousin Paul

I snort occasionally too.

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I snort occasionally too.

All our cousins do that, especially the horse thieves. But not cocaine -- no illegal monkey business.

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