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ruveyn ben yosef

Hard Fascism vs Soft Facism

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Hard Fascism, the sort practiced in Nazi Germany and Saddam Hussein's Iraq is a bloody thing. It is bones, breaking, the scream of torture and it cannot be disguised as something good or necessary. It is bloody awful (quite literally). Then there is Soft Fascism. That is the kind we have here in the United States. It is the fascism of unjust laws, crippling unnecessary regulation. The kind that ties the productive folk of the land down, line the Lilliputians tied down Gulliver.

I make an analogy (a rather unpleasant one, so cease reading here if you are bothered....). There are two kinds of mousetrap. The spring driven variety where a metal bar is pulled back and held in place to be released by tension. When poor Mouse nibbles the food bait of the trigger the metal bar is released and smashes down on the spine of the mouse killing him instantly.

Then there is the glue trap, a truly hideous thing that I used once and will never use again. Poor Mouse finds a limb stuck fast in this very sticky glue. The mouses runs hither and run carrying the full weight of the trap. Death is usually by exhaustion or if the mouse is lucky, by asphyxiation if he sticks his face into the glue. It is wretched to see the Mouse struggling and running back and forth carrying the trap. till he drops from agony and exhaustion. That is Soft Fascism. You get -stuck in it-. You perish of frustration and restraint. It is a slow agonizing way to die. The sticky trap of Soft Fascism is a spirit killer. It sucks the vitality right out leaving only the ever heavier burden to carry until one is gone in spirit if not in body.

That is what we are up against. The government not only wants your liberty and energy. It wants to suck the joy out of your life. For those who can get free, good for them. For those who are stuck fast, little hope and grim pain that lasts and lasts.

ruveyn

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From what I gather, the distinction of fascism, as a subcategory of statism, is governmental control of property with nominal private "ownership" acting as a false veneer of rights. Mussolini's Italy is usually brought up as the prime example. I see little substantial difference between any statist systems, since they all feature the institutionalized violation of individual rights. Like most of the Western world, the US is a mixed economy.

There are differences between such states that can be very meaningful to ordinary people. A given man may avoid murder or mutilation in the US because he has the right to carry firearms and to self-defense, whereas in Germany he may die, become crippled or prosecuted if he used enough force to reliably escape injury or death. An American woman's rapist (if he gets past her Glock 19) might be put away for a long time, whereas in Sweden he would be all but guaranteed success against disarmed victims and then let out in a few years, without escalation for repeat offenses. A US businessman might never have become one if he'd have to deal with 60% taxes and government control over his hiring practices.

But statism is on an aggressive rise in America as well, and in some arenas more so than in various European countries. You still have unmatched rights to free speech and self-defense, however, as well as more domestic options for employment and business locations. The current trend still has to be reversed if any of that is to remain, of course.

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I agree partially with L-C,

Facism is always statism, but statism doesn't always have to be fascism. There are a couple of profound differences between a statist society and a fascist one. In a fascist society (say, Hitler's Third Reich or Mussolini's Italy) the leader (the Fuhrer, il Duce) is always being portrayed as a hero, the saver of a race, a people, a country, with lots of 'good' qualities (brave, sacrificial, charismatic, loyal, etc.). Being presented as the only solution for the problems a country is facing. Also, in a fascist society exists extreme nationalism and violence is promoted as a moral way achieve your goals. Along with fascism comes racism, discrimination against a certain race or people, used as an scapegoat for the problems the country is facing. Last but not least, in a fascist society, everyone has to sacrifice themselves for the good of the nation, or the race (nazi Germany), when in a statist society you have to sacrifice yourself to the 'common good' (communist Russia). The outcome and the severeness of this sacrifice is quite alike, but it is still a main ideological difference. Remember the opening speech of BioShock of Andrew Ryan: ''No says the man in Washington, it belongs to the poor. No says the man in the Vatican, it belongs to god. No says the man in Moscow, it belongs to everyone.''?

But, as I said, I agree partially: fascism and statism are in many ways alike, the state wants to control every part (economic, cultural, personal) of your life, and therefore has a great amount (possibly intervening as much as possible - take Anthem as an example of a total statist society) of influence in the people's life.

As stated before, fascism is always statism (the state controls every part of life), but not every statist society is a fascist one (worshipping of one leader, promoting violence, racism against one race and sacrificing for the nation or race).

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