Joss Delage

Who's your current pick for president?

43 posts in this topic

I wish I were one of them, because then I would have all the money I need and wouldn't be eight years behind on my property taxes due to the low income I get "doing what I enjoy and do best while waiting for the money to come."

I've pitched this argument to a friend who worked in government at one time. His answer, paraphrased, was that the individuals have compartmentalized jobs--they can't see the whole picture--so they don't know what they're up to. They just perform the tasks they're given and the result is part of a composite of many workers' output which, when taken together, realize an organized plan. The folks that really know what the overall plan is number less than the fingers of one hand. That's why it's easy to keep this secret.

Since there are no candidates worth electing, with the exception of maybe Gary Johnson, who doesn't have a chance, I see no option but the Atlas Shrugged ending. Only difference is that in reality, the slobs that caused this mess will still be around to 'rebuild' again.

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I wish I were one of them, because then I would have all the money I need and wouldn't be eight years behind on my property taxes due to the low income I get "doing what I enjoy and do best while waiting for the money to come."

Things haven't been that bad for that long. And people hit hard times even in great economies/social structures/cultures, so you may need to look at other explanations.

At any rate, the above is exactly what one of them would say if cornered so I'm not convinced that you're not one of them.

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I was being facetious about wanting to be one of them. Don't be like some so-called "Objectivists" who are dense and stupid. Try to use a little common sense. :)

Things have been bad for a long time. The 1950s were the good times. It all went downhill in the '60s and '70s. Since I have a modest income, I've felt the economic 'boot' of government to a greater degree than a lot of folks, especially rich real estate tycoons who make their living off of tax sales. When you have a pretty much limited and fixed and faltering income, the tax demand keeps rising and you start to feel the squeeze--really feel it. The burden of government has risen exponentially since WWII. A pay stub from 1939 provides a startling contrast to a pay stub from today, in terms of percentage stolen in taxes. And my property tax bill went from a week's salary to more than a year's gross pay over the last 47 years. That says a lot right there.

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I was being facetious about wanting to be one of them. Don't be like some so-called "Objectivists" who are dense and stupid. Try to use a little common sense. :)

Funny, that's exactly what one of them, cornered in this way, would say. Unless you prove that you're not one of them, I'm going on the assumption that you are one of them . . .

Things have been bad for a long time. The 1950s were the good times. It all went downhill in the '60s and '70s. Since I have a modest income, I've felt the economic 'boot' of government to a greater degree than a lot of folks, especially rich real estate tycoons who make their living off of tax sales. When you have a pretty much limited and fixed and faltering income, the tax demand keeps rising and you start to feel the squeeze--really feel it. The burden of government has risen exponentially since WWII. A pay stub from 1939 provides a startling contrast to a pay stub from today, in terms of percentage stolen in taxes. And my property tax bill went from a week's salary to more than a year's gross pay over the last 47 years. That says a lot right there.

As others have tried to explain to you over the years, mweiss, we all have viable options even though things aren't anywhere near where they should be. (Did you use similar arguments during past recessions of note? Didn't massive booms follow those downturns? You could ride one of these wave whenever you're ready.)

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I've seen no massive booms following recessions, at least since the 1970s. What I've seen was a slow decline in living standards for most except those fortunate either by circumstances, personal relationships (connections) or by having the right idea at the right time.

Yes, we have 'viable' options, but that doesn't make them 'good' options.

I don't have to prove who I am. I am who I am. Either accept me, or don't.

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I've seen no massive booms following recessions, at least since the 1970s. What I've seen was a slow decline in living standards for most except those fortunate either by circumstances, personal relationships (connections) or by having the right idea at the right time.

Yes, we have 'viable' options, but that doesn't make them 'good' options.

People all around us have made fortunes, most of them starting with less than nothing. It can and is done all day, every day. So earning a decent living isn't some impossible dream, some sort of myth from a bygone era.

I don't have to prove who I am. I am who I am.

That's nice, but all you do is post as if the apocalypse is upon us, citing arguments that simply don't cut it.

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People all around us have made fortunes, most of them starting with less than nothing. It can and is done all day, every day. So earning a decent living isn't some impossible dream, some sort of myth from a bygone era.

A few have. The majority of people are in a rut. Partly of their own making and partly made by the unjust state of our society. The engines of upward mobility have been quenched by political corruption. The few prosper and the many stagnate.

Yes it is possible to rise. And yes, it is difficult, even more difficult now than in a reasonable and sane society.

ruveyn

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I've seen no massive booms following recessions, at least since the 1970s. What I've seen was a slow decline in living standards for most except those fortunate either by circumstances, personal relationships (connections) or by having the right idea at the right time.

The standard of living of the average American family in the 2000's is much better than it was in the 1970's. Think of the enormous improvements in average basic cars and housing that the typical American family enjoys. Look at what was considered luxury vs basic necessity in the 70's as compared to now.

My wife and I, on a lower class income, enjoy more niceties that the middle class probably did 30 years ago.

The quality and availability of medical treatment has increased exponentially. I remember even 10 years after one of my parents had cancer that what once was experimental cutting edge therapies had become routine and common place.

I had ACL-reconstruction surgery done via arthroscopic surgery, and one can barely see the scars on my legs. My surgeon was a then 50 something year old man, and the scars left on his knee from a similar surgery--but performed before arthroscopic methods became available--were hideous and spoke of a comparatively much more traumatic and painful surgery with much longer recovery times.

As a final thought, there is one thing I could name that would be enough to settle this argument: The internet.

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Things have been bad for a long time. The 1950s were the good times. It all went downhill in the '60s and '70s. Since I have a modest income, I've felt the economic 'boot' of government to a greater degree than a lot of folks, especially rich real estate tycoons who make their living off of tax sales. When you have a pretty much limited and fixed and faltering income, the tax demand keeps rising and you start to feel the squeeze--really feel it. The burden of government has risen exponentially since WWII.

There are things I do miss from the prior generations, such as the general innocence that existed in music and films, but other things I certainly don't miss. I don't miss the explicit racism that literally prevented my father's childhood friend from becoming a professional baseball player. I don't miss a society where being accepted as an atheist would have been much more difficult. I don't miss the then-primitive medical technologies: without the modern pacemaker, my grandfather would have missed 20 years of perfectly healthy, good living. I don't miss abortion being illegal, or a time before the birth-control pill.

A pay stub from 1939 provides a startling contrast to a pay stub from today, in terms of percentage stolen in taxes. And my property tax bill went from a week's salary to more than a year's gross pay over the last 47 years. That says a lot right there.

And the average pay stub of today enables an average American to afford a dramatically higher standard of living than in 1939, regardless of higher taxes. We should all be alarmed about increasing taxes, but there's no sense in context-dropping to make it sound like we're all worse than we were 70 years ago.

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My wife and I, on a lower class income, enjoy more niceties that the middle class probably did 30 years ago.

Many of which they couldn't have even dreamt of. Imagine the world without MRIs, PDAs, drones, etc.

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My choice for President will be whomever wins the GOP nomination. Obama must not get a second term. I would rather have Bush III (Romney) in office then another ObaMAO term.

BTW, Plan B has well nigh made abortion a non issue today.

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Technology has been a savior of our society, no doubt. But economically, besides the fact that a big screen TV costs about the same as a week's worth of groceries, all the living standard maintenance or increases are due to BOTH members of the household holding down full time jobs. Gone are the days when a family could live comfortably on one income of a blue-collar job.

Try living in an average house today, with property taxes approaching the price of a compact new car, and electricity costs that dwarf the mortgage payments from the 1980s. In 1972, I filled up my in ground oil tank for less than $500. Today it costs $8000 to fill it up. In 1966, my electric bill was $6/month. Now, with efficient LED lighting, it's $470/month. Taxes have increased 20,000% since 1966. Used to be one weeks' net pay. Now it's a whole year's gross pay from my videography business and doesn't get paid as a result that I need to eat and keep the electricity from being turned off.

In terms of the number of hours worked, back in 1939, supporting the government was a minor blip. Today it's most of your waking day spent working to pay the taxes and cost of government. No wonder all family members have to have jobs just to scrape by!

Sometimes I wonder if all the computers, internet, PDAs, smart phones, etc., have made us less locally connected and more isolated from our physical neighbors. Nobody talks to anyone these days. We're all strangers living on the same street. Kids don't play outdoors. They play computer games. (Predicting a massive surge in cardiac illness for the coming sedentary generation.) The internet is a huge time sink. How many of us spend countless hours each week in internet forums arguing about philosophy, politics, etc?

Medical is a mixed bag. Yes, advances are helping, but who can afford the cost? It's all great, but someone ELSE benefits because I cannot afford it.

I realize that the productive folks are busy doing productive work and hence are not likely to be aware of the massive homeless problem that is sweeping the nation out of the mortgage crisis. No longer winos and bums on the streets, but whole middle class families who've lost their jobs and were kicked out by the banks. Or by the tax collectors. 50 years ago, this was unheard of. Jobs were for life, and as long as you did your work, you could retire eventually. Nowadays, every day could be your last day on the job. Corporate management has become so corrupt that it turned to outright irrational greed, the sort of greed that gives rational self interest a bad name, to the point where it's become a contest of raising the bar for CEO salaries and seeing how many staff they can lay off to maximize stock value. That's just too much.

Now we have the Surveillance State. We are being watched, on cameras, at city streets, airports, bus stations, police roadside checks, the internet itself is being snooped. Now we have the NDAA and other atrocious laws that dissolve the Constitution entirely. It's a downright dangerous world. Today, if you don't like someone, you can phone in an anonymous tip to the police about that person and in some jurisdictions, the police will act on it in a most violent manner (Ogden, UT?). Fifty years ago, that would not happen. We didn't have a 'war on drugs' then.

Returning to the main topic, It's either Santorum or Obama, because the rest don't stand a chance with the media machine, and Santorum isn't going to fly with his religious views unless he hides them to get the votes. Obama gets another four years. Heck, he gets to ride the ship down to the bottom of the sea. He'll probably be the last US president. Diebold, the infamous fraudulent vote counting machine maker, is counting the votes on this election. The outcome is probably already chosen.

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Try living in an average house today, with property taxes approaching the price of a compact new car, and electricity costs that dwarf the mortgage payments from the 1980s. In 1972, I filled up my in ground oil tank for less than $500. Today it costs $8000 to fill it up. In 1966, my electric bill was $6/month. Now, with efficient LED lighting, it's $470/month. Taxes have increased 20,000% since 1966. Used to be one weeks' net pay. Now it's a whole year's gross pay from my videography business and doesn't get paid as a result that I need to eat and keep the electricity from being turned off.

Your comparisons are, for the most part, irrelevant and meaningless. Not taking inflation into account. . . wow. For instance: Your $8000 heating oil fill up would have cost you over $1500 in 1972 (using 2010 dollars.) Conversely, $500 (1972) would buy about $2600 in goods today. Something else must be going on, most likely taxes. Inflation alone can't account for the tax increases. Living in a blue state can. Solution: Move to a lower tax state. One with job growth. One where you would have greater opportunity to grow your business. I, myself, am considering a move to Texas.

I'm sure most everyone here is well aware of the dire condition of the USA. The choice between a marxist empty suit and Democrat-lite is not an appealing one. As the saying goes; good men do nothing, evil succeeds. One of the greatest things to happen in the political world is the advent of the tea party movement. Perhaps even do a video project for them. Are the tea partiers perfect? Hardly. Perhaps you may feel more at home with the drum beating whiners. Or you can do nothing but complain on this forum.

Speaking of drum beating whiners, when the 'occupy' movement got started, I decided I was sick and tired of being in the "99%." I decided to do something about it. No, not join with the great unwashed on the street corner. I started to make investments. As resources become available, I will make investments where I think I will make a profit. As of this writing, my portfolio is up 19%. You can do something about your situation or you can do nothing.

With all your doom and gloom, I have to wonder: Is the only reason you get up in the morning just to see how bad the day will be?

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Technology has been a savior of our society, no doubt. But economically, besides the fact that a big screen TV costs about the same as a week's worth of groceries, all the living standard maintenance or increases are due to BOTH members of the household holding down full time jobs. Gone are the days when a family could live comfortably on one income of a blue-collar job.

Try living in an average house today, with property taxes approaching the price of a compact new car, and electricity costs that dwarf the mortgage payments from the 1980s. In 1972, I filled up my in ground oil tank for less than $500. Today it costs $8000 to fill it up. In 1966, my electric bill was $6/month. Now, with efficient LED lighting, it's $470/month. Taxes have increased 20,000% since 1966. Used to be one weeks' net pay. Now it's a whole year's gross pay from my videography business and doesn't get paid as a result that I need to eat and keep the electricity from being turned off.

In terms of the number of hours worked, back in 1939, supporting the government was a minor blip. Today it's most of your waking day spent working to pay the taxes and cost of government. No wonder all family members have to have jobs just to scrape by!

Sometimes I wonder if all the computers, internet, PDAs, smart phones, etc., have made us less locally connected and more isolated from our physical neighbors. Nobody talks to anyone these days. We're all strangers living on the same street. Kids don't play outdoors. They play computer games. (Predicting a massive surge in cardiac illness for the coming sedentary generation.) The internet is a huge time sink. How many of us spend countless hours each week in internet forums arguing about philosophy, politics, etc?

Medical is a mixed bag. Yes, advances are helping, but who can afford the cost? It's all great, but someone ELSE benefits because I cannot afford it.

I realize that the productive folks are busy doing productive work and hence are not likely to be aware of the massive homeless problem that is sweeping the nation out of the mortgage crisis. No longer winos and bums on the streets, but whole middle class families who've lost their jobs and were kicked out by the banks. Or by the tax collectors. 50 years ago, this was unheard of. Jobs were for life, and as long as you did your work, you could retire eventually. Nowadays, every day could be your last day on the job. Corporate management has become so corrupt that it turned to outright irrational greed, the sort of greed that gives rational self interest a bad name, to the point where it's become a contest of raising the bar for CEO salaries and seeing how many staff they can lay off to maximize stock value. That's just too much.

Now we have the Surveillance State. We are being watched, on cameras, at city streets, airports, bus stations, police roadside checks, the internet itself is being snooped. Now we have the NDAA and other atrocious laws that dissolve the Constitution entirely. It's a downright dangerous world. Today, if you don't like someone, you can phone in an anonymous tip to the police about that person and in some jurisdictions, the police will act on it in a most violent manner (Ogden, UT?). Fifty years ago, that would not happen. We didn't have a 'war on drugs' then.

Returning to the main topic, It's either Santorum or Obama, because the rest don't stand a chance with the media machine, and Santorum isn't going to fly with his religious views unless he hides them to get the votes. Obama gets another four years. Heck, he gets to ride the ship down to the bottom of the sea. He'll probably be the last US president. Diebold, the infamous fraudulent vote counting machine maker, is counting the votes on this election. The outcome is probably already chosen.

This entire post is a stream of nonsense, ranging from the hippy attitude of "technology has made us less connected to each other", to context dropping comparisons across time that defy common sense, to conspiracy-theory Alex Jones-style nonsense. The primary problem here isn't the United States, but a person who's bitterness is obliterating his objectivity, and who needs to focus on regaining some positive attitude for living on this earth.

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Try living in an average house today,

For the comparison to be fair, you'd have to try to live in the average house of yesteryear, today. That's hard to do.

with property taxes approaching the price of a compact new car,

I didn't realize compact car prices had dropped by two thirds . . . (Where the heck do you live? There are perfectly safe, middle class neighborhoods on Long Island where one family units are taxed at $5-6K/year -- and they're a 30-40 minute rail ride from the center of the universe.)

Taxes have increased 20,000% since 1966. Used to be one weeks' net pay. Now it's a whole year's gross pay from my videography business and doesn't get paid as a result that I need to eat and keep the electricity from being turned off.

Maybe the business isn't clearing what it should? It sounds like you could make more working at Depot, taking advantage of their tuition reimbursement and potential growth to move up both the career and and income scale.

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Subject to later change, I will vote for Ron Paul in the Republican primary and Gary Johnson in the General. Mitt Romney will likely be the Rebublican candidate and I will not vote for him even if it means a vote for "The O". As a resident of New Mexico, Gary Johnson is known to be an original thinker, has courage and is an effective chief executive.

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The miserable performance of the Republican party will alienate the Independent Voters. Given that the Democrats have a plurality of the votes if the Independents do not align with Republicans, then the Democrats will prevail. I am predicting that the Lion King will be re-elected.

ruveyn

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Mitt Romney will likely be the Rebublican candidate and I will not vote for him even if it means a vote for "The O".

I can sympathize with your disliking Mittens the Flip-Flopping Cat, but at this point I don't understand the justification for not voting. Things are nearing a point of no return so fast that we can't indulge with the desire to hold our votes for some ideal candidate that probably isn't going to appear this election cycle. It's probably going to be Romney vs Obama, and considering how close it will probably be and how dire the consequences, not voting for Romney for all practical purposes is a vote for Obama.

At this point, to me, voting is an act of survival. I'm just trying to keep this boat above water long enough so that we have can have time to repair the breached hull...

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