Paul's Here

Oh My God Particle

28 posts in this topic

Another random thing to consider is that this discovery is being hyped because of the "5 sigma" of statistical significance:

We observe in our data clear signs of a new particle, at the level of 5 sigma, in the mass region around 126 GeV.

Keep in mind that the now debunked claim of discovering faster-than-light neutrinos was a 6 sigma measurement:

http://blogs.discove...ight-neutrinos/

This isn’t one of those annoying “three-sigma” results that sits at the tantalizing boundary of statistical significance. The OPERA folks are claiming a six-sigma deviation from the speed of light. But that doesn’t mean it’s overwhelmingly likely that the result is real; it just means it’s overwhelmingly unlikely that the result is simply a statistical fluctuation.

Is the theory of a Higgs-Boson particle and its importance for physics an idea solely based upon the Big Bang theory? If one rejects the Big Bang theory as a basic contradiction (nothing existed before BB but somehow something happened creating the universe), why can't the possibility of finding such a particle, or at least its importance if it is discovered, be rejected outright? Does mass vs. energy really require an explanation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the theory of a Higgs-Boson particle and its importance for physics an idea solely based upon the Big Bang theory?

No, the Higgs boson is predicted by the "Standard Model" of particle physics.

If one rejects the Big Bang theory as a basic contradiction (nothing existed before BB but somehow something happened creating the universe), why can't the possibility of finding such a particle, or at least its importance if it is discovered, be rejected outright? Does mass vs. energy really require an explanation?

By the rationalism of the theory used to "predict" the Higgs boson one can reject that this boson must exist. Whether a new particle exists at about 125GeV though is immaterial to this. It may be that they found a new particle with this detector, but this doesn't necessarily validate any theory. No theory that I'm aware of predicted a particle at 125GeV way back before the experiments had already narrowed the window of masses down.

Long story short, there may be a particle at 125GeV, but it doesn't have to be the Higgs boson, and I'm not even sure if they know it's a boson at this point. To know that it's actually the Higgs boson they'd have to do some kind of very precise test, such as finding a way to interact with the Higgs field or who knows what.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites