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Joss Delage

1942 color pictures for the Office of War Information

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1942 Office of War Information color pictures on 4x5 Kodachrome - strong women (mostly) hard at work for the war effort: http://bit.ly/wSmEit

Those pictures are amazing.

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Beautifully lit and composed images. Gotta love large format photography. Thanks for posting.

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1942 Office of War Information color pictures on 4x5 Kodachrome - strong women (mostly) hard at work for the war effort: http://bit.ly/wSmEit

Those pictures are amazing.

The color pictures I see today are not nearly as rich in color and as warm. What is the technical difference? I know nearly nothing about color photography.

Ba'al Chatzaf

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The 4x5 negative is about four times the size of a 35mm negative and, therefore can hold more information. Also, the films chemistry plays a big role. I'm sure you have heard of a film's "speed" or ISO/ASA rating. The lower the ISO/ASA = the "slower" the film = the finer the grain = the more detail that can be recorded. It doesn't matter if using BW or color film.

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The 4x5 negative is about four times the size of a 35mm negative and, therefore can hold more information. Also, the films chemistry plays a big role. I'm sure you have heard of a film's "speed" or ISO/ASA rating. The lower the ISO/ASA = the "slower" the film = the finer the grain = the more detail that can be recorded. It doesn't matter if using BW or color film.

Resolution of an image is a different question than tint or the depth or intensity of color. Kodak film was known for resulting in certain deeper tints but that may not be the full answer to ruve's question.

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Those are beautiful and intriuging pictures. Digital has some catching up to do. It was truely a sad day when the last roll of Kodachrome was processed on 30 December 2011.

Slides I took in 1961 with my first 35mm camera were on Kodachrome 10 ASA. They have not aged at all.

While I enjoy the latest Pentax K5 Digital SLR, my heart is with the pure manual (don't need a battery) Pentax MX cameras made from steel. It's hard to love a plastic camera.

On that note, one can see on ebay, how a simple 'beginners' Pentax K1000 is more in demand than the models that followed - and were soon outdated with difficult to find batteries and parts.

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Those are beautiful and intriuging pictures. Digital has some catching up to do.

Digital cameras now have the resolution and sensitivity to take professional quality photos in a large format. There is nothing in principle that excludes digital sampling from duplicating Kodak film results in resolution, contrast, tints, brightness, depth of color or anything else that can be captured on film. The pictures being praised here are being viewed as digital scanned images of the original photos, viewed using a browser program that only controls bits on a digital monitor. And that is with images that have been compressed -- to reduce the amount of information transmitted and stored on your computer -- as jpeg images with loss of the less imporant content. On a professional monitor with uncompressed files (of the type that loses information) the results would be even better.

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