Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
AlexL

The unabated Ayn Rand's popularity in India

6 posts in this topic

Rand is a perennial presence on Indian bestseller lists and regularly name-checked on the "favourite author" list of influential Indians -- from company CEOs to Bollywood stars. ...The socio-cultural milieu in India was very conformist, and suddenly this voice emerges that challenges the established order, that celebrates individuality. It was very inspirational ... Indian society, despite economic growth, despite globalisation remains very conservative. So I think her work still resonates here, it provides a space for people to question the traditional order and be an individual...

http://www.repost.us...6f50badf9b26346

http://jewishworldre...rand_india.php3

Sasha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rand is a perennial presence on Indian bestseller lists and regularly name-checked on the "favourite author" list of influential Indians -- from company CEOs to Bollywood stars. ...The socio-cultural milieu in India was very conformist, and suddenly this voice emerges that challenges the established order, that celebrates individuality. It was very inspirational ... Indian society, despite economic growth, despite globalisation remains very conservative. So I think her work still resonates here, it provides a space for people to question the traditional order and be an individual...

http://www.repost.us...6f50badf9b26346

http://jewishworldre...rand_india.php3

Sasha

From the article:

"You Are Born to Blossom," "You Are Unique" and "Indomitable Spirit" are just some of the books written by the former head of state.

The taste for "inspirational" literature has even extended to Adolf Hitler's "Mein Kampf" -- popular in business student circles as a management strategy guide.

Novelist Shobhaa De recalled how Rand's books had acquired "a cult status" on university campuses some 40 years ago.

"As far as young Indians are concerned the cult has never ended."

"Her books are about idealism, heroism and corruption -- issues that are of particular interest to the young of India," De said.

That is not as weird as it sounds. To see why read -Liberal Fascism- by Joshua Goldberg I suspect the folks in India are hankering after "a third way".

I just read Mein Kampf (translated into English) and if you can forget WW2 and the Holocaust for just a short while (this is not easy, I can tell you), you can see where idealists might get sucked in. Twenty of the Hitler Twenty Five point program for a bigger, better and reconstituted German Reich overlays the FDR New Deal perfectly. Hitler wrote his screed just about the time when Musollini was a big hit with the progressives. Of course this is an illusion which was clearly shown when the "shirts" both brown and black went about busting skulls during the 30's

ruveyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read Mein Kampf (translated into English) and if you can forget WW2 and the Holocaust for just a short while (this is not easy, I can tell you), you can see where idealists might get sucked in.

I tried to read Mein Kampf twenty years ago and gave up after 50 or so pages: I found it uninteresting - extremely boring, repetitive, mediocre and stupid.

Sasha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read Mein Kampf (translated into English) and if you can forget WW2 and the Holocaust for just a short while (this is not easy, I can tell you), you can see where idealists might get sucked in.

I tried to read Mein Kampf twenty years ago and gave up after 50 or so pages: I found it uninteresting - extremely boring, repetitive, mediocre and stupid.

Sasha

It was not great literature. However it did give an insight into what made Hitler tick. Nothing good, I am afraid. Unfortunately the world did not take him seriously, at least not at first.

ruveyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read Mein Kampf (translated into English) and if you can forget WW2 and the Holocaust for just a short while (this is not easy, I can tell you), you can see where idealists might get sucked in.

I tried to read Mein Kampf twenty years ago and gave up after 50 or so pages: I found it uninteresting - extremely boring, repetitive, mediocre and stupid.

Sasha

It was not great literature. However it did give an insight into what made Hitler tick. Nothing good, I am afraid. Unfortunately the world did not take him seriously, at least not at first.

ruveyn

They still don't. See the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, Hezbollah, and the Mullahs in Iran.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0