realitycheck44

Mobility WOD blog

35 posts in this topic

I've been dealing with my fair share of injuries—four surgies in the past three years (and looking at a fifth), starting with a misdiagnosed hip injury that I played soccer, skied, and climbed on for 4 years before anyone bothered to inform me it might be more than a groin pull (boys don't cry, right?). After dealing with tons of compensation issues, I'm finally better. But I somehow expect that I can sit at a desk for 16-20 hours a day and then do things like climb at a semi-elite level and jump off 50 foot cliffs on skis. Anyway, I stumbled across this awesome website called mobility WOD (Workout Of the Day). It's an excellent resource for people like me who want to regain range of motion and avoid compensation issues in general. I used the "voodoo floss band" on my knee to astounding results.

Here's the first episode.

This is my favourite MOB, though.

I've never found a physical therapist with whom I more agree about body mechanics or from whom I've learned as much as I have from that site. Hope this helps somebody here find a way to get their back, knee, ankle, etc in working order again.

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He's welcome to chime in here if he wants. I know enough about my body to know that this is the best help that I've found. The guy who runs the blog is a DPT and has worked with Olympic athletes. I've seen 12 different physical therapist in 3 different states. The best one I've found is one who worked with some Olympic skiers, and I still don't think she was a knowledgeable and informed as the guy running the blog.

From my discussions with Ray, he seems to have a different focus in his practice than athletes performing at the elite level (though perhaps I am misinformed). I don't claim to know more than Ray regarding exercise, I just know what works for me. And just getting stronger with one 20 minute workout per week does not address the habitual compensation issues associated with my hip injury.

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And just getting stronger with one 20 minute workout per week does not address the habitual compensation issues associated with my hip injury.

The whole point would be to see if RayK has insights that may not relate directly to the approach he teaches "normal" people.

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I appreciate your concern, John. If you derive no gain from the mobility site, then by all means don't use it. I do derive a great benefit from it, and it has taught me a great deal about how to mobilitize my joints without the aid of a physical therapist. Having the world-record holder in the squat explain to me (in a video) how his lack of hip ROM limited his ability to squat effectively and how he is dealing with it is extremely valuable to me.

I am happy to discuss the effectiveness of the mobilityWOD site (have you tried the exercises? do they work for you?), but am unwilling to discuss Ray's knowledge or experience without him present.

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I am happy to discuss the effectiveness of the mobilityWOD site (have you tried the exercises? do they work for you?), but am unwilling to discuss Ray's knowledge or experience without him present.

I never suggested we discuss his expertise without him here. Nor did I indicate that I was looking to discuss WOD. All I suggested was that you talk with RayK for his views on your specific situation -- if he has any. (if you haven't noticed, he hasn't been here for some time.)

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NP! And congrats on graduating from Webb (we used to live in Roslyn Heights and we've always been into boats so we're well aware of Webb.)

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Hello everyone, as John stated I do not log in here very often any more but I still read threads/posts but for the most part I am unwilling to comment anymore. But because I was mentioned along with my facility I wanted to inform people of what I do and what I have accomplished with many different people, athletes included. So, I would like to start with a few anecdotes (which are not scientific evidence but do give one a glimpse into what can be obtained.)

This first gentleman was the 1976 Canadian National Champion in acrobatics while also setting 3 world records. He was one of the original acrobats at the Cirque du Soleil show Mystere where he did shows nighly (sometimes multiple shows) until he was injured which was for more than 6 years. He came to me after having six surgeries, five on his right knee and one on his left. He could barely walk and was so weakened in his right leg that he consciously would always start walking with his left leg. Today this gentleman can once again perform all sorts of acrobatic tricks and is once again doing shows and instructing.

"I have without a doubt, never before experienced an exercise protocol that has improved and shaped my body in such an effective manner in the least amount of time.

I do acrobatics for a living and at 47 years old (he is now in his mid 50s) and at my age I am endlessly mindful of the dangers that my work may inflict upon me mentally and physcially. Progressive Exercise has alleviated most of the stress I endure associated with the constant maintenance of my body and has generaged within me a renewed source of physical and mental strength.

After my 15 minute workout, I am left exhausted, lying on the floor in the most aerobically ecstatic state that I have ever encountered. I employ only 3 of the 5 available machines (he now only does 2 exercises per week)."

The next example is of a gentleman that was the Nevada State Champion in tennis while in high school. He was awarded an athletic scholarship for tennis at Princeton where he competed at the highest college levels. He chose to go into business after college instead of pursuing a tennis carrer and has done very well for himself financially, but at the cost of his body degrading. At 30 years of age when he came to me and at a height of 5ft 8in he weighed 230 pounds. With just the training I have described many times on this forum he was able to lose almost 50 pounds (training once a week). He played tennis in a recreational manner for some time after college but as he gained the weight he noticed how it effected his game and he almost quit playing all together. After about 6 months of training with me he thought he would like playing tennis on a recreational basis again, he loved it. He then went from solely recreational tennis to competitive tennis once again and won first place at his club and went on to multiple state competitions. All of this was done with once a week training and a reduction in his total workout to just three exercises while also spending 12 plus hours per day at his office desk.

The next example is the gentelman from above's wife. She came to me as she noticed her husband making wonderful progress in many areas of his life. She had just had a child and was over weight and physically lacking in muscle stamina. We only had a few months together before she once again got pregnant and because of her doctor's recommendation she put her workouts on hold. After her twins were born she wanted to play tennis along with her husband and started doing so and injured herself, knee and lower back. She contacted me to ask if I could help her as the physical therapy was not working. I told her that I could do so and we once again started the training around the start of the new year. In that short amount of time she has lost more that 25 pounds while adding muscle and with just the program described many other times on this forum she is beating her competition without injury and has also increased her stamina and speed.

This next example is a gentleman that is a lawyer and lives in Utah yet has an office in Las Vegas. Unfortunately we do not get together as often as we would like but we still push his limitations everytime he comes in with just two exercises. This gentleman spends a lot of time behind his desk and or driving between his home in Utah and his office in Las Vegas.

"Today I won the gold medal at the Utah Summer Games! This is a testimony to Progressive Exercise's methodology! Thanks Ray!" June 23, 2012

Another example is a married couple that are in their mid-fifties and are both executives that spend more than 60 hours per week working at their jobs and when not working they travel a lot. After years of their bodies degrading they met one of my clients and even though they were training at a gym 5 days a week they decided it was not working. They both love to ski yet they noticed that their knees were no longer to take the abuse of the activity nor did they have the stamina anymore. After the first 6 months with me the ski season was in their minds and vacation plans. They went skiing and noticed the positive benefits that Progressive Exericse had on their capacity to take on the demands of the activity and still have the strength and stamina to carry on. Today, about 5 years later they are only doing a once a week workout and instead of degrading they are performing at an even higher level than before.

This example is of a gentleman in his 40s that is a police officer who has worked all sorts of units to include undercover narcotics. In his very limited off time he like to cycle on a competitive racing level. When he came to me he was more than 40 pounds over weight and attempting to maintain his performance by training in a similar fashion as most trainder perscribe, it was not working. In just nine months of being with me he was able to drop the weight and he did no cycling. He then chose to compete in a cycling competition that he had competed in many times and had done the previous year. With no real training on his cycle, except one a week rides for two months before the race, he dropped almost 20 minutes of his previous best time in this race and came in first place for his age.

This next example is of a woman now in her mid-thirties that played high-school and college sports but had not done much since leaving school. She came to me soon after he second son was born and was about 30 pounds over weight. Within a short amount of time she had lost the weight and then soon after became pregnant again. She worked out with me once a week up until 5 days before she gave birth to her third son. Within eight weeks of giving birth she was back in my office working out and lost more than 50 pounds of weight gained during the pregnancy and was down to 116 pounds her lightest since high-school. She decided that she wanted to compete in triathlons and to make certain that she would not overtrain we went to once every two weeks workouts and she had one day of training in the three activities done during triathlons. She has now competed in mulitple triathlons and come in firts place multiple times and even beat a lot of the male competitors.

All of these examples were trained in the same manner at Progressive Exericse as the bodies functions do not change because we do different activities. It seems that a lot of people today (especially people in medical and physical training fields) assume that one must have a specific exercise program for specific activities which is totally unfounded. All humans have the same physiology and muscular/joint functions. So, the shoulder, the knee, the elbow, the ankle, the hip all move around their respective joints in the same manner under all activities. In different terms, it is unsound to think that man needs a different workout for different activities as muscle-tendon units do not change their function because we happen to change the activity, they either contract or extend and that is all muscles do.

Muscles are made up of tissues consisting of large numbers of specialized cells)fibers with the power of shortening and thickening so as to approximate their ends and effect movement. About 60% of the bodies weight (a mostly lean body) consist of muscle of which most is attached to the bone by tendons and it is this attachment that allows for contraction of the joints to bend (flex) or straighten (extend). Muscle fibers convert chemical energy into mechanical energy/movement.

Tendons are a connective, INELASTIC tissue which are made up of tough fibrous structure comprised primarily of bundles of collagen. Collagen is an important protein structural element in the body which is very strong and formed into bundles which are twisted together to make up the tendons and bones. Tendons are repsonsible for the transfer of the force created by the muscle to the connecting bone, thus moving the bone. (As a side note on injuries, the long tendon of the biceps muscle in the upper arm can become weakened as a result of repeated rubbing against the humerus, upper arm bone, and may even rupture under moderate stress. In other words simple "wear and tear" over time can cause injury, it does not have to be because of something very traumatic.)

Ligaments are tough fibers which stabilize and strengthen joints, preventing excessive movement, thereby reducing the likelihood of injury. Ligaments hold bones within joints keeping them firmly in place. ligaments also hold organs firmly in place such as the stomach, kidneys, gallbladder, large bowel, upper duodenum, liver, bladder and the uterus just to name a few.

Neither ligaments nor tendons have a large amoaunt of capillaries in them and hence why they take so long to heal and inflammation to dwindle as our overall recuperaton is tied to our cardio-respiratory system. (Inflammation is a natural reaction to an injured area and prostaglandins are released to the area which induces pain and immobility. Pain relievers such as aspirin block the production of prostaglandins which allows for reduced pain and mobility within the injured are. Movements that are taken in the morning cause the release of endorphins which are opiate proteins that do not stop the production of prostaglandins but instead block their effect allowing for less pain and mobility). So, it is not stretching that facilitates healing nor the gaining back of one's flexibility. It is the muscle that has the capacity for flexibility and allowing time for the area (including soft tissues) to heal and inflammation to dwindle while also allowing the muscle to regain it's size and strength that enhances one's flexibility. As a matter of a fact excessive stretching of the ligaments and tendons (the joints) has actually been shown to weaken the whole are along with causing micro-tears within those tissues which diminishes one's flexibilty and hence one's ability to function.

I hope those that have a concern find this information insightful by offering a glimpse into what I do at Progressive Exercise. I educate and train people in accordance to the nature of the human body which allows the individual to take that enhanced body and mind and go go enjoy life.

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Ray, two comments:

1. I am aware of what you do at Progressive Exercise at this point, and I'm in large agreement with the majority of your posts on the subject and exercise in general. That was an extremely long post above, but you never referenced the site that I linked above or gave an insight into how you personally combat compensation issues associated with injuries. The body is a "system of systems," that does an extremely effective job at covering up for an injury. I could (and did) workout 1x per week for 20 minutes focusing on two-five exercises, but this did NOTHING to help my compensation issues. Static stretching and mobilization efforts are completely different things. How can I get the most out of the leg press if my left hip is constantly on the verge of dislocating (which it was)? Doing the MOB that I linked above helps settle my hip back into the socket where it belongs. Are you suggesting this is a futile effort? Do you believe that, regardless of injuries or lack of mobility/functional positioning, one 20 minute workout is the solution?

2. I wonder what your thoughts on these two articles by Mark Twight, reknown ex-alpine climber and fitness fiend: http://gymjones.com/...dge/article/44/ http://gymjones.com/...ge/article/42/. He was committed to a similar, low-frequency, high-intensity workout regiment, but found that it left much to be desired for the endurance athlete (which is what it takes to climb mountains).

Like I said, I have received exceptional benefit from the mobility site. I tweaked a tendon on the medial side of my knee that was being very stubborn to heal. While increased strength certainly helps motor control and is great preventative medicine, using this "voodoo floss band" technique has also been exceptionally helpful. Do you think this problem could have been solved just as quickly with rest and exercise alone? Why?

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I like the MobilityWOD site & I follow their broadcast. It's cool stuff, and his use of rubber bands to "floss" the fascia has helped me improve my groin flexibility by a lot. I use Iron Woody bands, foam rolls, and lacrosse balls a fair deal to hopefully reduce adhesion.

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Realitycheck44,

I think my mulltiple thousands of post on this forum already answer most questions relating to these type of subjects and many more. I do not think that further discussion will change most people's mind and I no longer care to attempt to do so. If there are any people seriously concerned to find out more I am certain they can find my phone number or email on the internet as I am done answering the same questions for free.

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After further thought I would like to clarify and offer a few items. First, realitycheck44 had a phone consultation with me years ago but never came into my office. He never stated that it felt like his hip was dislocated and as a matter of fact he stated that he had an injury but was healing from it and felt fine. He never called back, never emailed me, never came to my office and never stated that the leg press was causing him any pain or discomfort. As a matter of a fact, years after we had our phone consultation he recommended to his mother that she consult with me and then he paid for her to have a phone consultation. I could be wrong but most people do not recommend others, especially their own mother, if they are unsatisfied with their progress.

I have written about joint dislocations under other threads years ago, so I am not going to go through another full explanation of all those items. But I will offer that if realitycheck44 had a dislocation of the hip and did not have surgery to correct it after it had been improperly reduced into the joint that his joint is an injury waiting to happen. A great amount of force is required to dislocate a hip joint which is often accompanied with fractures of the pelvis and or legs along with back injuries. So, if realitycheck dislocated his hip while skiing (I do not know the exacts as he never told me) and was fortunate enough not to have broken the bones mentioned while also having it reduce itself improperly it should be no surprise that his whole surrounding area was in constant pain. With that stated, neither exercise nor stretching will reduce the hip back into it's proper position and will require X-rays and or a CT scan and surgery to reduce it into it's proper position.

Further, if one "tweaks" a tendon the reason it is being "stubborn" is because of what I mentioned in many other posts and threads, our recuperation is tied to our cardio-respiratory and metabolic system. In other words the tendons and ligaments of our bodies do not have the same amount of capillaries flowing through them as the muscle and hence take longer to feed the toxic build-up from an injury through the cardio-respiratory system to the liver, kidneys and gall-bladder where they are processed out of the body. As a matter of a fact a simple ankle sprain takes a minimun of 6 weeks to heal and major injuries of the ligaments and tendons take from 6 to 9 months. One's tendon is not being stubborn it is acting in accordance to it's nature along with the other systems of the body that are acting in accordance to their nature. The only way to speed up one's recuperation is to speed up one's metabolism which by the way shortens one's life span.

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Further, if one "tweaks" a tendon the reason it is being "stubborn" is because of what I mentioned in many other posts and threads, our recuperation is tied to our cardio-respiratory and metabolic system. In other words the tendons and ligaments of our bodies do not have the same amount of capillaries flowing through them as the muscle and hence take longer to feed the toxic build-up from an injury through the cardio-respiratory system to the liver, kidneys and gall-bladder where they are processed out of the body. As a matter of a fact a simple ankle sprain takes a minimun of 6 weeks to heal and major injuries of the ligaments and tendons take from 6 to 9 months. One's tendon is not being stubborn it is acting in accordance to it's nature along with the other systems of the body that are acting in accordance to their nature. The only way to speed up one's recuperation is to speed up one's metabolism which by the way shortens one's life span.

I've heard mentionned that high volume / low weight work might be helpful for some form of soft tissue pain. I never tried that myself, but the logic behind it was to help flush out the injury toxins via lactic acid. It was more an empirical finding than something based on research, but apparently some powerlifting coaches use that approach with some categories of soft tissue injury.

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Further, if one "tweaks" a tendon the reason it is being "stubborn" is because of what I mentioned in many other posts and threads, our recuperation is tied to our cardio-respiratory and metabolic system. In other words the tendons and ligaments of our bodies do not have the same amount of capillaries flowing through them as the muscle and hence take longer to feed the toxic build-up from an injury through the cardio-respiratory system to the liver, kidneys and gall-bladder where they are processed out of the body. As a matter of a fact a simple ankle sprain takes a minimun of 6 weeks to heal and major injuries of the ligaments and tendons take from 6 to 9 months. One's tendon is not being stubborn it is acting in accordance to it's nature along with the other systems of the body that are acting in accordance to their nature. The only way to speed up one's recuperation is to speed up one's metabolism which by the way shortens one's life span.

I've heard mentionned that high volume / low weight work might be helpful for some form of soft tissue pain. I never tried that myself, but the logic behind it was to help flush out the injury toxins via lactic acid. It was more an empirical finding than something based on research, but apparently some powerlifting coaches use that approach with some categories of soft tissue injury.

Please explain to me how they overcome the nature of the liver, kidneys and gall-bladder in with standing more than a certain amount of toxins at any one time. The truth is they cannot overcome those obstacles and hence what I have mentioned before about general movement and the release of hormones allowing mobility but doing nothing to speed up the recuperation.

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I don't know. I suppose the underlying hypothesis is that the limiting factor in normal healing isn't the liver and gall bladder but rather the fact that those tissues are not vascularised, and therefore cannot flush the toxins fast enough. Again, this was an empirical finding by some lifting coaches, not something from the scientific world. (As a side note, I've heard that the Voodoo bands wok in a similar manner - that by putting them on and then releasing them, they create a slightly higher pressure of fluids into the soft tissues and help flush out toxins.)

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I don't know. I suppose the underlying hypothesis is that the limiting factor in normal healing isn't the liver and gall bladder but rather the fact that those tissues are not vascularised, and therefore cannot flush the toxins fast enough. Again, this was an empirical finding by some lifting coaches, not something from the scientific world. (As a side note, I've heard that the Voodoo bands wok in a similar manner - that by putting them on and then releasing them, they create a slightly higher pressure of fluids into the soft tissues and help flush out toxins.)

The supposed underllying hypothesis is unfounded as working out is the equivalent of causing a mini injury, toxins are released and they must also be dealt with. In other words, what ever might happen to be pumped away (which is usually very limited because an injured area creates a "wound pouch" that keeps the toxins from spreading and harming other non-injured cells and is then slowly feed off) was replaced by more toxins. So, I offer that anyone that came up with the idea that the liver does not play a part in recuperation totally misunderstands the nature of the liver and the human body. I also offer that the idea that tissues are not vascularized is unfounded as they would be dead if they did not have blood flowing through them (in actual terms to be vascularized means to be highly endowed with blood vessesl which as I already stated the ligaments and tendons are not). When we workout in any manner we release conflicting hormones that cause expansion and constriction of blood vessels this is what causes us from sending to much toxins to those organs that deal with such entities and using up it's limited resources in a short time frame which would cause such things as renal failure. Finally, I offer that when one knows the nature of an entity and yet seems to have conflicting evidence then that is the time to check one's premise as contradictions do not exist in reality. But to know that there is a problem requires that one have an understanding of the nature of those entities.

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Maybe it doesn't work, and maybe it does work but it's another mechanism. At this point, I don't have enough data, but I might try the approach to see if there's something to it.

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Maybe it doesn't work, and maybe it does work but it's another mechanism. At this point, I don't have enough data, but I might try the approach to see if there's something to it.

As I stated in my earlier post, I did not expect to change any minds. My reason for writing in this thread was to demonstrate what my focus in training and educating people was. So, all the examples in my extremely long post were not to brag but to demonstrate that I work with all sorts of people from athletes to those that sit at their desk all day and yet all of them achieve an enhanced body which translates to an enhanced life. If people still want to think that their muscles do things abnormal to their nature, besides contract and extend, then they can do so. If people want to think that stretching causes some miracle like thing to happen, even though the facts of reality oppose that, such as studies that demonstrate a weakening of the muscle from 12 to 15 percent from just 5 minutes of stretching and causing micro tears in ligaments and tendons over time which weakens the joint which is the total opposite of what one wants, then they can do so. If people want to think that their muscles will not gain stamina when they work out with weights, even though their strength increase totally destroys that myth because as a muscle gets stronger it increases it's ability/capacity to withstand the physical demands put upon it, then they can do so. If people want to think that they can retain their neurological efficiency of an activity even though they only perform an activity once or twice a year which has nothing to do with muscle stamina and instead is related to the neurological system not wasting one's limited resources by maintaining efficiency in an activity they almost never do, then they can do so. In slightly different terms what I just mentioned is known as the principle of Specific Adaptations to Implied Demands (SAID) and people that understand the fundamentals of the body understand it has nothing to do with one's muscles not having stamina but instead with the utilization of one's limited resources. Lastly, if people want to think they can get a fundamental understanding of a subject by reading research articles (even though most are contradictory to each other) instead of learning the subject, within accordance to their chosen values, which means they will not have a fundamental undertanding to act as their guide in determining whether or not something is correct/true or not, then they can do so.

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Somehow, I missed this post by Ray. Also, I don't know how this turned into another thread of "RayK vs. the world." The point of this thread was to focus on the mobility WOD blog, which RayK has not commented on in the least. That blog does NOT (for the most part) advocate "stretching." It advocates mobility and positional control, which is a very different thing.

After further thought I would like to clarify and offer a few items. First, realitycheck44 had a phone consultation with me years ago but never came into my office. He never stated that it felt like his hip was dislocated and as a matter of fact he stated that he had an injury but was healing from it and felt fine. He never called back, never emailed me, never came to my office and never stated that the leg press was causing him any pain or discomfort. As a matter of a fact, years after we had our phone consultation he recommended to his mother that she consult with me and then he paid for her to have a phone consultation. I could be wrong but most people do not recommend others, especially their own mother, if they are unsatisfied with their progress.

Actually, I simply called to set up the consultation for my mom. You were gracious enough to offer your time when I called, and I felt we had an excellent conversation. I do not live close enough to Las Vegas to visit your office or I would do so. But, as I said above, this thread is NOT about a workout program.
I have written about joint dislocations under other threads years ago, so I am not going to go through another full explanation of all those items. But I will offer that if realitycheck44 had a dislocation of the hip and did not have surgery to correct it after it had been improperly reduced into the joint that his joint is an injury waiting to happen. A great amount of force is required to dislocate a hip joint which is often accompanied with fractures of the pelvis and or legs along with back injuries. So, if realitycheck dislocated his hip while skiing (I do not know the exacts as he never told me) and was fortunate enough not to have broken the bones mentioned while also having it reduce itself improperly it should be no surprise that his whole surrounding area was in constant pain. With that stated, neither exercise nor stretching will reduce the hip back into it's proper position and will require X-rays and or a CT scan and surgery to reduce it into it's proper position.
I did have surgery on my hip. And my knee and my collarbone and my jaw and now probably my wrist. Like I said, I've been dealing with injuries for a while. To be clear, I never dislocated my hip, but tore the labrum playing soccer (because of a bone spur on the head of my femur). After playing on a bum hip for four years, the body simply does not return to normal. Two years after surgery (which fixed the issues), it was still sitting on the edge of the socket and leg was perpetually internally rotated. No amount of getting stronger will (or has) helped me get over those issues. I climbed Rainier and lifted regularly, but struggled when my physical therapist asked me to balance for 30 seconds on my left leg (and I have excellent balance). For me, it's about getting stronger in the right way.

Did you even look at the links I provided? This is different than stretching. Loading up the hip joint with a band has very real benefits for me. After spending some time "flossing" my hip, it feels like it's in a much better place, allowing my glut med to control internal rotation (rather than my TFL). I can get the same effect from going to the PT having them work on my hip, but this lets me do it in the comfort of my own home for a fraction of the price.

Do you have experience dealing with active, fit athletes who have had the types of injuries and injury patterns that I do? All of my injuries are on the left side of my body. This isn’t coincidence.

Further, if one "tweaks" a tendon the reason it is being "stubborn" is because of what I mentioned in many other posts and threads, our recuperation is tied to our cardio-respiratory and metabolic system. In other words the tendons and ligaments of our bodies do not have the same amount of capillaries flowing through them as the muscle and hence take longer to feed the toxic build-up from an injury through the cardio-respiratory system to the liver, kidneys and gall-bladder where they are processed out of the body. As a matter of a fact a simple ankle sprain takes a minimun of 6 weeks to heal and major injuries of the ligaments and tendons take from 6 to 9 months. One's tendon is not being stubborn it is acting in accordance to it's nature along with the other systems of the body that are acting in accordance to their nature. The only way to speed up one's recuperation is to speed up one's metabolism which by the way shortens one's life span. [bold mine]
Like Joss said, in my experience, the metabolic and cardio-respiratory system is NOT the limiting factor in healing an injury. Numerous examples in my own life have led me to believe this, regardless of what "research" or "experts" say, yourself included. Like you said in bold, tendons and ligaments are vascularlized, but have generally poor blood flow. My personal experience completely disagrees with your last statement, and I would love if you could back that up. In my opinion, the quickest way to heal an injury (unless it occurs as a result of a muscle imbalance) is to increase blood flow to the area. This way the toxins are carried away faster than they would otherwise be. This is what the "voodoo bands" and cold-water immersion techniques accomplish. In high school, when I was climbing alot on a bum hip, my left forearm got severe tendonitis in the wrist flexor tendons. I rested for years with no appreciable gain in pain relief. Pain was bad enough that pushups, pullups, bench press, etc all seemed to make it flare up. I started working with a CHT from Asia who understood the advantage of deep-tissue frictoin massage and ROLFing. While I understand that the research is still up for debate, I found that this was the only thing that made a difference for me. I've also head good things about eccentric loading, but have never tried it long enough to see if it truly works.

Two other examples:

A few months ago, I partly tore the extensor hood near the PIP joint of my 3rd phalanx. After waiting quite a while, I noticed no appreciable gains in comfort. I considered seeing a hand surgeon to fix the issue. After reading an excellent blog post by a top climber, I figured I’d give some of his “remedies” a try. After less than a week of trying the deep-friction massage and cold-water immersion techniques, the hand was feeling 75% better and I was back climbing shortly afterwards.

Last time I tweaked a tendon on my knee, it was because I climbed Mt. Rainier off the couch (no training) last summer. Not surprising, descending 10,000 vertical feet in one 19 hour day was a bad idea and the knee didn't like it at all. I assumed I wasn't strong enough, and started working out again as soon as the knee could handle it (about a month). I did this with my best understanding of Ray's program. And I could barely walk around day 2-3 and was sore for a full 5-6 days afterwards, so I assume the intensity was about as high as I could get it. The knee started acting up again in April while skiing in 15" of new snow at 33* (basically, skiing in wet cement). This time, I tried deep-friction massage for the tissue and cold-water immersion. Those helped quite a bit, but doing the cold-water immersion for the knee is a pain. I was able to return to lifting and soccer, but I still get some pain hiking downhill. So I tried the “Voodoo floss bands” from the MWOD website. That seems to really help, more than anything else I’ve tried.

You keep repeating yourself, but I wonder if you actually took a look at the site I linked or whether you’ll actually consider the arguments I’m making here. I don’t expect advice for free, but, then again, I’m not looking for your advice. If you feel like dialoging on these issues, I would be happy to learn from you experience. But I have learned a great deal from my experience in dealing with injuries. I do what works for me.

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A few months ago, I partly tore the extensor hood near the PIP joint of my 3rd phalanx. After waiting quite a while, I noticed no appreciable gains in comfort. I considered seeing a hand surgeon to fix the issue. After reading an excellent blog post by a top climber, I figured I’d give some of his “remedies” a try.
Meant this sentence to be hyperlinked to this site, which states
Deep friction massage (DFM) has been successfully used to treat ligament tears and promotes local hyperaemia, analgesia and reduction of adhesion formation. DFM is applied perpendicular to the direction of the fibres in the tissue being treated. The aim of this therapeutic modality is to separate fibres, mechanically assisting alignment in the appropriate direction. Flexor pulley fibres run in a transverse direction and it follows that massage should be longitudinal along the affected finger. Studies have shown that the effects of DFM are dependent on mechanical force. Heavy pressure must be applied to promote fibroblast proliferation.

A relatively poorly understood method of increasing local blood flow is ice massage. Ice is routinely used to reduce circulation, swelling and pain during the acute inflammatory phase. In this type of therapy (cryotherapy) significant cooling is applied to reduce the skin temperature to 12-15 Celsius. This results in vasoconstriction and resultant reduced blood flow. However, it has been observed that more gentle cold application to a small area around the injury has a somewhat different effect. The skin temperature should not fall below 15 Celsius. After a brief period of vasoconstriction, there is a large reactive hyperaemia. Lewis first described this reaction in the hands in 1930. The Lewis reaction is thought to be a tissue protective mechanism, but its function is not well understood (Lemons & Downey 2001). The reactive vasodilatation occurs after 30-40 minutes of cold application and when the hand is sufficiently warm once more, vasoconstriction occurs once more and the pattern continues in an oscillating fashion. Thus, the treatment should ideally last 30-40 minutes and should involve only moderate cooling.

This is what I mean by cold-water immersion therapy. It is a very different technique and purpose than icing (cryotherapy), which reduces inflammation. This technique doesn't work for everything, but I think it's patently false to say that there is nothing one can do to speed up recovery of tendons or ligaments.

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I did look at your links and went through a large portion of the whole website. Last I checked the body of an athlete and a non-athlete are the same. Or am I mistaken? So, in general, what works to heal or stimulate one type of human works to heal or stimulate another type of human. Because no matter what type of human they all have the same recuperative organs and hence why I can quickly discard irrational ideas in a short manner of time (as I remember Stephen Speicher did the same things on many subjects). Maybe one should be more connected to reality and recognize that the human body has physical limitations to what it's parts can withstand and stop doing activities that cause such injuries but that does not seem to be happening. It also seems that some people think that only athletes (elite ones at that) are the only group of pepole to have had injuries and learn from them, well they are not. I have had my shoulder dislocated, my right knee dislocated twice, my left knee once, many broken fingers, I broke my C3 and C4 in my neck and herniated a disc in the lumbar area of my lower back.

I define the entities under discussion to demonstrate what can be done and what cannot be done within their nature which is what most people fail to recognize and which has never been explained how one can overcome the nature of an entity. Or, do you not not agree with the law of identity (remember A is A) and non-contradiction? So, it seems to me that the information was overlooked as no one has made any mention of undestanding the nature of any of those items. We are at an impasse until people recognize the nature of those items under discussion and as of yet have been ignored along with the factual evidence place right in front of them. In slightly different terms, what fails to be recognized is the nature of the entities under discussion and hence why people come to irrational conclusions on what is really happening. For example, I have already discussed why simple movements can make one feel better but do nothing to help the area heal.

Your statements about me thinking it is me against the world are fallacious as I have never stated that, but if that is what you think that could be stated about anyone, Ayn Rand included, when they stick to their fundamentals while having discussions. You see, the nature of an entity does not change, a tendon, a ligament, a bone are all inelastic, but slightly flexible entities and if they were elastic and could be stretched into all sorts of manners you would have no taughtness to move yourself and your joints would come apart. But, as I stated earlier, people can think as they want to.

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Last time I tweaked a tendon on my knee, it was because I climbed Mt. Rainier off the couch (no training) last summer. Not surprising, descending 10,000 vertical feet in one 19 hour day was a bad idea and the knee didn't like it at all. I assumed I wasn't strong enough, and started working out again as soon as the knee could handle it (about a month). I did this with my best understanding of Ray's program. And I could barely walk around day 2-3 and was sore for a full 5-6 days afterwards, so I assume the intensity was about as high as I could get it. The knee started acting up again in April while skiing in 15" of new snow at 33* (basically, skiing in wet cement). This time, I tried deep-friction massage for the tissue and cold-water immersion. Those helped quite a bit, but doing the cold-water immersion for the knee is a pain. I was able to return to lifting and soccer, but I still get some pain hiking downhill. So I tried the “Voodoo floss bands” from the MWOD website. That seems to really help, more than anything else I’ve tried.

You keep repeating yourself, but I wonder if you actually took a look at the site I linked or whether you’ll actually consider the arguments I’m making here. I don’t expect advice for free, but, then again, I’m not looking for your advice. If you feel like dialoging on these issues, I would be happy to learn from you experience. But I have learned a great deal from my experience in dealing with injuries. I do what works for me.

The definition of intense is to do something to an extreme degree. So, by the very nature of doing something intensely it cannot be done for a long duration. Your mountain climbing was not intense if it lasted 19 hours as an intense mountain climb would be over with quickly. For example, one can sprint as intensely as possible for a short duration, or they can run for a long time with very low intensity. So, what has been demonstrated is that not only do you not understand my ideas, but that you also do not understand the nature of your body. And I keep repeating myself because the fundamentals of a subject do not change, remember the law of identity. Finally, it seems you have not learned much from your experiences or you would stop duplicating them and injuring yourself.

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[This is what I mean by cold-water immersion therapy. It is a very different technique and purpose than icing (cryotherapy), which reduces inflammation. This technique doesn't work for everything, but I think it's patently false to say that there is nothing one can do to speed up recovery of tendons or ligaments.

I once again ask how you get over the limiting factors/nature of the organ that is the largest contributor to one's recuperation, the liver? I offer that you read Dr. Hans Selye's wonderful book "The Stress Of Life" in which he illuminates the reader with his more than 50 years of research on the human body.

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