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JohnRgt

Where did Freud's Id come from?

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when anger boils up we learn to keep our behavior under control and act reasonably.

It's been a long time since my cursory intro to psychology, but i remember the Id as being far, far more destructive that you've made it out to be and ever-present; it isn't just the capacity to get angry or hate.

When the time comes we can prevent our strongest passions and emotions from overcoming reason.

But these are functions of internalized values, ideas, standards, etc., not the actions of some barely contained beast that comes within a hair of prevailing under certain conditions.

One of the main lessons we learn in our childhood is self control.

Or, one of the main lessons we learn is to value in ways that doesn't give rise to violence and destruction under 99.99% of circumstances. We need someone more knowledgeable to jump in, but I don't think we're "controlling" anything. Even if we are, it's the residue of erroneous internalizations which makes the conduct you're referring to a function of volition, not some natural or primordial beast that lurks within.

Most of the time we are not provoked to anger and violence so we do not have to fight our combative urges constantly.

I don't see how pointing this out supports the notion of an inherent tendency to violence and destruction that we, at best, learn to control.

Whoever said it was constant? Not I.

Constant, in the sense that it's always lurking, waiting for such conflicts to assert itself.

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To JohnRgt: Did you ever see the movie Forbidden Planet? An entertaining piece of sci-fi, but unfortunately it shows how pervasively the idea of an "Id" has been accepted in our culture. Do you remember these lines? "Monsters, John...monsters from the Id!" and "We're all part monsters in our subconscious. That's why we have laws and religion." (That movie, by the way, was not only influenced by Freud, but also by Plato. Which makes me wonder: Philosophically, would we have had Freud if it wasn't for Plato?)

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To JohnRgt: Did you ever see the movie Forbidden Planet? An entertaining piece of sci-fi, but unfortunately it shows how pervasively the idea of an "Id" has been accepted in our culture. Do you remember these lines? "Monsters, John...monsters from the Id!" and "We're all part monsters in our subconscious. That's why we have laws and religion." (That movie, by the way, was not only influenced by Freud, but also by Plato. Which makes me wonder: Philosophically, would we have had Freud if it wasn't for Plato?)

Interesting question. In The Timeus Plato tells of that the world of Ideas is the Real Reality whereas the world of the sense is only an imitation or similacarum of the Real Reality. In The Republic Plato likes our world of the senses to a shadow show in a cave. What we experience with our senses is not the Real Reality.

Please see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_Cave

ruveyn

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