elliott.ohara

My next read

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So, I've read "The Virtue of Selfishness", "Capitalism, the Unknown Ideal", all of Ayn Rand's fiction work, and Yaron Brook's "Free Market Revolution". I just bought "Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand" by Leonard Peikoff, but I'm not sure if I should read it next or get something different. I was considering "Philosophy, Who Needs It?" by Ayn Rand.

Suggestions anyone?

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So, I've read "The Virtue of Selfishness", "Capitalism, the Unknown Ideal", all of Ayn Rand's fiction work, and Yaron Brook's "Free Market Revolution". I just bought "Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand" by Leonard Peikoff, but I'm not sure if I should read it next or get something different. I was considering "Philosophy, Who Needs It?" by Ayn Rand.

Suggestions anyone?

Don't forget about fiction!

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I liked the "Ominous Parallels".

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I really like The Romantic Manifesto. It'll make everything about art more clear to you, and I've also found it to be a source of inspiration.

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I'll second the motion on what Betsy said. Even though my favorite book by Ayn Rand (or anyone!) is The Fountainhead, the book that really got me started on studying Objectivism was The Romantic Manifesto. But that's because of my personal interest in art and literature; your own personal interests may be different. The nice thing about Ayn Rand's thought (and her fiction) is that all of the ideas in her philosophical system exist on a continuum, so that if you start with a work dealing with a subject that interests you it almost naturally leads to another work by her, and that one to another, and that one to another, and so on. But in regard to Philosophy: Who Needs It, I think that would naturally be a great choice. By the way, that is one of my favorite books. And it contains my favorite essay in Objectivist literature, "The Metaphysical versus the Man-Made". I'll be happy to know if you read the book and enjoy it. I don't know how many times I've recommended that essay to people who seem to be interested in and struggling with the idea of free will (an idea, which, I think, is one of the most crucial premises a person can hold) but who never read it! So I've stopped giving out copies of that book to people (I stopped loaning copies a long time ago; they never come back, and those same people never seriously pursue Objectivism afterwards). (Talking about "The Metaphysical versus the Man-Made" reminds me that I've been wanting to try to start a discussion about free will in the philosophy department of this forum; I'll do it now.) Also: going to any lectures by Objectivist scholars or any conferences where a large number of Objectivists are going to speak is a great experience; I've enjoyed the ones I've gone to--especially a conference on the Arts given on a cruise ship by the Quent Cordair Fine Art gallery (www.cordair.com) --and gotten a lot out of them, especially during the Q and A's. Anyway, let us know what you decide to read and what you thought of it!

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I've read all the Ayn Rand fiction that I know about.

Atlas Shrugged, Fountainhead, We The Living, Anthem, and Three Plays.

Thanks for the suggestions! I'm 4 or 5 chapters into "Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand", and I'm really enjoying it. I think I'll finish it.

Thanks for the recommendation on "Philosophy, Who Needs It?", Jim. I think I'll do that next, unless I'm in a mood for fiction. If I am, does anyone have a fiction recommendations?

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I've read all the Ayn Rand fiction that I know about.

Atlas Shrugged, Fountainhead, We The Living, Anthem, and Three Plays...

There is also a collection of early short stories.

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To elliot.ohara: In answer to your question (post #7), I'll second ewv's motion; I think he was referring to The Early Ayn Rand, which includes a few short stories, two plays and a film scenario ("Red Pawn", which is very good).

But outside of Rand, and not having, of course, read all the world's fiction, I would recommend Ken Follett's Eye of the Needle, an excellent WWII spy thriller with an erotic element. Also, two plays: Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond Rostand and Inherit the Wind, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee.

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Thanks for the suggestions! I'm 4 or 5 chapters into "Objectivism, The Philosophy of Ayn Rand", and I'm really enjoying it. I think I'll finish it.

Thanks for the recommendation on "Philosophy, Who Needs It?", Jim. I think I'll do that next, unless ...

If you like those books then you would find Leonard Peikoff's lectures on the history of philosophy both interesting and informative. They are now available very inexpensively as downloads:

Founders of Western Philosophy: Thales to Hume - $10.99

Modern Philosophy: Kant to the Present - $10.99

He covers the progression of western philosophy from the time of the Greeks to the present, clarifying and describing the major ideas, how one theory led to the next in reaction, what the major errors were, and what was done right -- at least in direction -- where that occurred. It concludes by describing the Objectivist answers to the major problems of philosophy, showing how to compare it with other common views. This will give you a much deeper appreciation of the scope and depth of Ayn Rand's accomplishment, as well as a better appreciation of where we are now and why (for example with Pragmatism) and the extent of the problems that must be overcome.

Be sure to look up the books he cites as his sources, look up the quotes he uses and read more on their context, and use them to expand your general knowledge. With the internet this research is easier to do now than it used to be.

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