ruveyn ben yosef

GORT and the government...

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In the 1950s version of The Day the Earth Stood Still we learned that the society from which an extraterrestrial traveler Klattu came from was governed by a race of robots with the following characteristics:

1. They were stronger or more powerful that the humanoid beings who created them

2. The were given dominion over the humanoids by the humanoid to enforce certain social rules.

3. The power given to this race of robots could not be surpressed or revoked by their creators.

In effect, the race of robots of which Gort (Klatu's robot companion) was one, was the government of Klatu's society. It operated according to know rules, it was all powerful and it was not corruptable. It could not be fooled or bribed.

Now kind sirs, and siresses, is this the kind of government you would like to have. A government that operated according to laws your are willing to abide by, and a government that cannot be fiddled, diddled, bribed, fooled or diverted from its task of enforcing the rules. Assume the rules to be the set of principles Objectivist say they would like to live under...

Is this what you want?

ruveyn

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Is this what you want?

Hell, no! I want a government of objective laws, not a government of men -- or robots.

Making, applying, and enforcing proper laws requires thinking men, not robots.

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Is this what you want?

Hell, no! I want a government of objective laws, not a government of men -- or robots.

Making, applying, and enforcing proper laws requires thinking men, not robots.

In the story the GORTS are programmed with moral law. It is clear and breaking it means destruction. The law is that no one is to -initiate- force on any one else. And the GORTS are human designed and human programmed. Once the are booted, loaded and turned on the authority exert cannot be revoked. They can't be fooled, cajoled, bribed or corrupted.

Is this like the government you want?

ruveyn

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The original version of The Day the Earth Stood Still, from 1951 with Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal, is the movie that turned me on to movies. I first saw it when I was seven years old. I still enjoy it. I have it on DVD. But, in its politics, the film was just a big plug for the U.N. It was an implicit call for a world government.

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The original version of The Day the Earth Stood Still, from 1951 with Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal, is the movie that turned me on to movies. I first saw it when I was seven years old. I still enjoy it. I have it on DVD. But, in its politics, the film was just a big plug for the U.N. It was an implicit call for a world government.

Not the last scene. That was pure Hobbes. Look at it again.

ruveyn

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The original version of The Day the Earth Stood Still, from 1951 with Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal, is the movie that turned me on to movies. I first saw it when I was seven years old. I still enjoy it. I have it on DVD. But, in its politics, the film was just a big plug for the U.N. It was an implicit call for a world government.

Not the last scene. That was pure Hobbes. Look at it again.

Hobbes was an apologist for absolute monarchs and the totalitarian state -- which is horrible too.

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Hobbes was an apologist for absolute monarchs and the totalitarian state -- which is horrible too.

But he made an unassailable case for the necessity of government.

What did he say about the life of man in Nature? It is the warre of all against all. The life of men is nasty, brutish and short.

And that is why we need a government that keeps the peace. Just like Klaatu's robot GORT.

You folks here say you want a government that runs under objective law. GORT was the agent of exactly that kind of government. It can't be bribed, it can't be bamboozled, it can't be corrupted and it can't be dissuaded by by pity or sentiment.

Here is the quote from Hobbes:

"Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of Warre, where every man is Enemy to every man; the same is consequent to the time, wherein men live without other security, than what their own strength, and their own invention shall furnish them withall. In such condition, there is no place for Industry; because the fruit thereof is uncertain; and consequently no Culture of the Earth; no Navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by Sea; no commodious Building; no Instruments of moving, and removing such things as require much force; no Knowledge of tviolent death; And thhe face of the Earth; no account of Time; no Arts; no Letters; no Society; and which is worst of all, continuall feare, and danger of the life of man, solitary, poore, nasty, brutish, and short."

Come to think of it, that sounds like a typical day under the Obama administration

ruveyn

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I would claim that Hobbs would love such a robot, but I would apire to figure out a way to dismantle it

You however came up with an interesting point, can proper law be managed with artificial intelligence? (supposing that society could agree on what proper law is?)

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I would claim that Hobbs would love such a robot, but I would apire to figure out a way to dismantle it

Bang on! That is what Hobbes proposed. A commonwealth is an "artificial man". In his day no one could imagine robots, so his "artificial man" is composed of human beings functioning as a governing machine.

ruveyn

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