ruveyn ben yosef

Once again, Rush has something to say...

9 posts in this topic

I think my favorite Rush song is still The Camera Eye

Grim-faced and forbidding,

Their faces closed tight,
An angular mass of New Yorkers
Pacing in rhythm,
Race the oncoming night,
They chase through the streets of Manhattan.
Headfirst humanity,
Pause at a light,
Then flow through the streets of the city.

They seem oblivious
To a soft spring rain,
Like an English rain
So light, yet endless
From a leaden sky.

The buildings are lost in the limitless rise.
My feet catch the pulse and the purposeful stride.

I feel the sense of possibilities,
I feel the wrench of hard realities.
The focus is sharp in the city.

Wide-angle watcher
On life's ancient tales,
Steeped in the history of London.

Mist in the streets of Westminster.
Wistful and weathered,
The pride still prevails,
Alive in the streets of the city.

Are they oblivious
To this quality?
A quality
Of light unique to
Every city's streets.

Pavements may teem with intense energy,
But the city is calm in this violent sea.

It's such an unusual, genuinely benevolent, and energetic description of a city

http://youtu.be/2LmIOg33oPo

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Rush's music epitomized, like no other, the innocent youthful excitement and seemingly limitless energy and growth of the 1980's.

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Maybe another song where they have something to say.

My uncle has a country place

That no one knows about.
He says it used to be a farm,
Before the Motor Law.
And on Sundays I elude the Eyes,
And hop the Turbine Freight
To far outside the Wire,
Where my white-haired uncle waits.

Jump to the ground
As the Turbo slows to cross the Borderline.
Run like the wind,
As excitement shivers up and down my spine.
Down in his barn,
My uncle preserved for me an old machine,
For fifty-odd years.
To keep it as new has been his dearest dream.

I strip away the old debris
That hides a shining car.
A brilliant red Barchetta
From a better, vanished time.
I fire up the willing engine,
Responding with a roar.
Tires spitting gravel,
I commit my weekly crime...

Wind-
In my hair-
Shifting and drifting-
Mechanical music-
Adrenalin surge...

Well-weathered leather,
Hot metal and oil,
The scented country air.
Sunlight on chrome,
The blur of the landscape,
Every nerve aware.

Suddenly ahead of me,
Across the mountainside,
A gleaming alloy air-car
Shoots towards me, two lanes wide.
I spin around with shrieking tires,
To run the deadly race,
Go screaming through the valley
As another joins the chase.

Drive like the wind,
Straining the limits of machine and man.
Laughing out loud
With fear and hope, I've got a desperate plan.
At the one-lane bridge
I leave the giants stranded at the riverside.
Race back to the farm, to dream with my uncle at the fireside

Red Barchetta: a benevolent song about an unusual future dystopia where apparently traditional motor cars have been banned. The protagonist drives through the highways of the countryside in an old muscle car, eluding authorities in an exhilarating race.

http://youtu.be/FAvQSkK8Z8U

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Never having been that much of a Rush fan in the past I did get intrigued here lately upon hearing how they (specifically Neil Peart) were supposedly supporters of Objectivistism and fans of Ayn Rand. Well as far as I can tell, while they may have paid some lip service to Ayn Rand and her ideas in their younger days I don't think it could be said that in the "long run" that holds true.

According to the Wiki entry on Neil Peart (under political views) it appears he's back peddaling a way from any former advocacy of her ideas he may have voiced. I'm afraid I have to lump him in there with the likes of Paul Ryan as another one of those individuals who really just didn't understand much of what she was trying to say to begin with.

Peart has never publicly identified with any political party or organization in Canada or the United States. Even so, his political and philosophical views have often been analyzed through his work with Rush and through other sources. In October 1993 shortly before that year's Canadian federal election, Peart appeared with then-Liberal Party leader Jean Chrétien in an interview broadcast in Canada on MuchMusic. In that interview Peart stated he was an undecided voter who supported Quebec federalism.[47]

Peart is often categorized as an Objectivist and an admirer of Ayn Rand. This is largely based on his work with Rush in the 1970s, particularly the song "Anthem" and the album 2112, the latter specifically credited to "the genius of Ayn Rand."[48] However, in his 1994 Rush Backstage Club Newsletter, while contending the "individual is paramount in matters of justice and liberty," Peart specifically distanced himself from a strictly Objectivist line.[49] In a June 2012 Rolling Stone interview, when asked if Rand's words still speak to him, Peart replied: "Oh, no. That was 40 years ago."[50] Peart has also ascribed to a philosophy that he has called "Tryism", which means that anything that one tries to attain will be attained if one tries hard enough.[51]

Although Peart is sometimes regarded as a "conservative" and "Republican" rock star,[52] he, in 2005, described himself as a "left-leaning libertarian",[53] and is often cited as a libertarian celebrity.[54][55] In July 2011 Peart reiterated those views, calling himself a bleeding-heart libertarian.[56]

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No one that

Never having been that much of a Rush fan in the past I did get intrigued here lately upon hearing how they (specifically Neil Peart) were supposedly supporters of Objectivistism and fans of Ayn Rand. Well as far as I can tell, while they may have paid some lip service to Ayn Rand and her ideas in their younger days I don't think it could be said that in the "long run" that holds true.

According to the Wiki entry on Neil Peart (under political views) it appears he's back peddaling a way from any former advocacy of her ideas he may have voiced. I'm afraid I have to lump him in there with the likes of Paul Ryan as another one of those individuals who really just didn't understand much of what she was trying to say to begin with.

Peart has never publicly identified with any political party or organization in Canada or the United States. Even so, his political and philosophical views have often been analyzed through his work with Rush and through other sources. In October 1993 shortly before that year's Canadian federal election, Peart appeared with then-Liberal Party leader Jean Chrétien in an interview broadcast in Canada on MuchMusic. In that interview Peart stated he was an undecided voter who supported Quebec federalism.[47]

Peart is often categorized as an Objectivist and an admirer of Ayn Rand. This is largely based on his work with Rush in the 1970s, particularly the song "Anthem" and the album 2112, the latter specifically credited to "the genius of Ayn Rand."[48] However, in his 1994 Rush Backstage Club Newsletter, while contending the "individual is paramount in matters of justice and liberty," Peart specifically distanced himself from a strictly Objectivist line.[49] In a June 2012 Rolling Stone interview, when asked if Rand's words still speak to him, Peart replied: "Oh, no. That was 40 years ago."[50] Peart has also ascribed to a philosophy that he has called "Tryism", which means that anything that one tries to attain will be attained if one tries hard enough.[51]

Although Peart is sometimes regarded as a "conservative" and "Republican" rock star,[52] he, in 2005, described himself as a "left-leaning libertarian",[53] and is often cited as a libertarian celebrity.[54][55] In July 2011 Peart reiterated those views, calling himself a bleeding-heart libertarian.[56]

It's well established that the trio have always been libertarians to one extent or another, that they've never claimed to be Objectivists. (I'm near certain you know libertarians that are nuts about Miss Rand, just as I'm sure you've heard people interpret The Fountainhead from a subjectivist outlook that could, and often does, veer left and keeps heading left.)

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Never having been that much of a Rush fan in the past I did get intrigued here lately upon hearing how they (specifically Neil Peart) were supposedly supporters of Objectivistism and fans of Ayn Rand. Well as far as I can tell, while they may have paid some lip service to Ayn Rand and her ideas in their younger days I don't think it could be said that in the "long run" that holds true.

In Rush's early days their songs (compositions?) were borderline too cerebral, where a single song could be 15 to 20 minutes, broken up into sections, telling a story in parts that figuratively refers to something abstract. In "Hemispheres" you have an imagined battle between people who give allegiance to Apollo and his reason, whereas others follow Dionysus and "love", with the rift bringing trauma and war, until a mysterious traveler unites the "hemispheres" into a perfect sphere of reason and love. In 2112 you have a future dystopia like in 1984 or Rand's Anthem, where someone discovers a guitar hidden in a cave full of abandoned junk, and rediscovers music and creative expression, only to later be crushed and commit suicide (this album was the one dedicated to Ayn Rand). In other places they do get rather explicit with selfishness and something that reminisces of Rand's ethics

Know your place in life is where you want to be

Don't let them tell you that you owe it all to me

Keep on looking forward; no use in looking 'round

Hold your head above the ground and they won't bring you down

Anthem of the heart and anthem of the mind

A funeral dirge for eyes gone blind

We marvel after those who sought

New wonders in the world, wonders in the world,

Wonders in the world they wrought.

Live for yourself -- there's no one else

More worth living for

Begging hands and bleeding hearts will

Only cry out for more

Well, I know they've always told you

Selfishness was wrong

Yet it was for me, not you, I

Came to write this song

The above is from "Anthem" by Rush.

Overall I think Rush did what Terry Goodkind did with books---only in reverse. Goodkind began an artistic construction, appeared to have discovered Rand, then awkwardly sewed Objectivism explicitly into his novel series. With Rush, ideas of Rand were sprinkled heavily in their beginning works, only to slowly phase out. I'm not sure Peart ever was an Objectivists. I think he's just a very intelligent, well-read man, who went through a brief phase of really being interested in Rand and her ideas. Regardless, he's lead an immensely productive and admirable life.

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Some of the posts in this thread have been split off into a separate thread titled "Why are some people fascinated by cars?" here.

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