ruveyn ben yosef

Why are some people fascinated by cars?

19 posts in this topic

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What is it about automobiles that seem to fascinate you so?

When I see a car, I see a device which gets me from A to B.

The only things that matter to me are the reliability of the device and its cost of operation.

You seem (my guess) to see more there.

ruveyn

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Just about the only one that doesn't see more is you, ruveyn.

Yup. I am one of those strange folk who regard automobiles as means of transportation.;.

But I am irrational enough to love my bike because it benefits my body to use it to get about.

ruveyn

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Just about the only one that doesn't see more is you, ruveyn.

Yup. I am one of those strange folk who regard automobiles as means of transportation.;.

But I am irrational enough to love my bike because it benefits my body to use it to get about.

ruveyn

The cars in question aren't designed for simple transportation, though, those who buy them aren't looking for just A to B transportation. People spend a lot of time in their cars, a good deal of that driving. What's wrong with wanting them to be fun, ie, have a performance bias?

And as you know, any object can be designed to a standard so high that it's valued for far more than its basic use/function; at that point, it can become a concretization of joy, excellence, innovation, empowerment, one's success, one's zest for life, etc. Isn't it a good cultural sign that there's demand for fun cars?

Sports cars, your enemies on the NJTP because, I'm guessing, you hover in the left lane at 54mph, are designed to maximize joys like high acceleration and/or speed, high levels of connectivity and interaction, great handling, great looks. uniqueness, exclusivity, etc. We live in an era where family sedans with a serious sporting side are available, as are performance SUVs, sporty daily commuters, etc.

Fact is, these attributes have been seeping into mainstream cars for some time now. Would you prefer to live in a culture that exhibited no such passion for an activity that takes up so much of people's time? Isn't it great that this passion has taken this basic mode of transportation and focussed it in a such a way that people enjoy operating it, often using it for the sheer pleasure of using it?

Your Honda is a Honda because it exhibits such traits, not because it can take you from A to B. When Honda decided to move away from its sporting heritage and drop out of racing at the beginning of this century, its cars lost a good chunk of what made them unique among mainstay automobiles. Sales were hurt, Honda's reputation among car fans plummeted. Now, they're trying to return to that glory but it takes far longer to rebuild than to dismiss as unnecessary; and others have stepped up with designs that went some way of filling the void Honda policy created, so they'll be competing with other powerhouses for the unique image they owned for decades.)

The better question, ruveyn, would be how can you drive your whole life, be an applied scientist, a student of Objectivism, and not develop an appreciation of cars that go that extra step? (Have you ever lived with a performance car, or did you dismiss the idea out of hand, insisting that a transportation tool simply can't be fun to operate while transporting you?)

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Just about the only one that doesn't see more is you, ruveyn.

Yup. I am one of those strange folk who regard automobiles as means of transportation.;.

But I am irrational enough to love my bike because it benefits my body to use it to get about.

...The better question, ruveyn, would be how can you drive your whole life, be an applied scientist, a student of Objectivism, and not develop an appreciation of cars that go that extra step? (Have you ever lived with a performance car, or did you dismiss the idea out of hand, insisting that a transportation tool simply can't be fun to operate while transporting you?)

Bob with his bicycle is a confirmed curmedgeon who can't part with his old fashioned big spoked wheels. Maybe he could test the waters of modernity and work his way into it gradually starting with a sports car like a 1949 MG TC with 19" spoked wire wheels and swept wing front fenders that don't hide them as much. If he finds that fun and interesting he could move into the 1950s with an MG TD with disk wheels. They even benefit his body because sometimes he would have to jump out and push. They don't have pedals to turn but do come with a hand crank as an option to start the engine. Who knows what might become possible to him!

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Just about the only one that doesn't see more is you, ruveyn.

Yup. I am one of those strange folk who regard automobiles as means of transportation.;.

But I am irrational enough to love my bike because it benefits my body to use it to get about.

ruveyn

Perhaps you should try racing at 200 mph. From what I've heard and seen, it takes quite a bit of physical strength to control and maneuver cars around the race track. Race car drivers have to be in excellent physical strength.

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ruveyn dream car:

flintstones.jpg

Gets you from point A to B and give you physical exercise.

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Just about the only one that doesn't see more is you, ruveyn.

Yup. I am one of those strange folk who regard automobiles as means of transportation.;.

But I am irrational enough to love my bike because it benefits my body to use it to get about.

ruveyn

Perhaps you should try racing at 200 mph. From what I've heard and seen, it takes quite a bit of physical strength to control and maneuver cars around the race track. Race car drivers have to be in excellent physical strength.

I would rather fly. I used to be a licensed pilot. (Now my eyesight and reflex time would disqualify me).

Planes are faster than autos and they move in 3 D not in 1.5 D (linearly on roads with very little lateral traverse).

And they require more skill and guts. When things go wrong in the air (God forbid!) one cannot pull over on the side to figure what is wrong.

ruveyn

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Sports cars, your enemies on the NJTP because, I'm guessing, you hover in the left lane at 54mph, are designed to maximize joys like high acceleration and/or speed, high levels of connectivity and interaction, great handling, great looks. uniqueness, exclusivity, etc. We live in an era where family sedans with a serious sporting side are available, as are performance SUVs, sporty daily commuters, etc.

I never hog the left lane. It is against the motor vehicle code in NJ. Left lane is for passing. Period. End of Story. I also keep a three second interval between me and the car in front of me. I am a stickler for the motor vehicle code. I learned to drive in California where people actually stop to let pedestrians cross the street. I detest the typical vicious anti-social New Jersey drivers. They are stupid, reckless and mean. Being rotten behind the wheel is (I believe) a requirement for getting a driver's license in New Jersey.

ruveyn

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I would rather fly. I used to be a licensed pilot. (Now my eyesight and reflex time would disqualify me).

Planes are faster than autos and they move in 3 D not in 1.5 D (linearly on roads with very little lateral traverse).

And they require more skill and guts. When things go wrong in the air (God forbid!) one cannot pull over on the side to figure what is wrong.

He bravely flew a pre Sopwith Camel because it had spoked wheels that remained in place!

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ruveyn dream car:

flintstones.jpg

Gets you from point A to B and give you physical exercise.

This unfair. Look at the older style wheels -- no spokes.

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I also keep a three second interval between me and the car in front of me.

One car length between you and the car ahead of you per 10mph is the best rule of thumb. Of course with modern brakes, we could probably increase the mph but it's a great guideline.

I learned to drive in California where people actually stop to let pedestrians cross the street.

You mean to jaywalk . . .

I detest the typical vicious anti-social New Jersey drivers. They are stupid, reckless and mean. Being rotten behind the wheel is (I believe) a requirement for getting a driver's license in New Jersey.

Curtesy on the road has plummeted by a shocking amount around here.

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ruveyn dream car:

flintstones.jpg

Gets you from point A to B and give you physical exercise.

This unfair. Look at the older style wheels -- no spokes.

Keeping the bowling ball on the outside helps with inline stability, I'm guessing. I'd bet pulling it in just as the front end bites at the beginning of a turn increases maneuverability. Primitive but effective . . .

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You mean to jaywalk . . .

Not at all. I cities in California (at that time, many years ago) pedestrians had the right of way at intersections with cross walks and no traffic lights.

One slowed down and if as pedestrian started to cross, the driver was required to stop and lit the pedestrian across. It was very civilized back then.

In Boston or in New Jersey the cars would whip around the pedestrians "crossing their T". I once stopped to let a pedestrian cross in Boston and I was rear-ended.

ruveyn

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Not at all. In cities in California (at that time, many years ago) pedestrians had the right of way at intersections with cross walks and no traffic lights.

That is still the case. When I first moved to California, I didn't know that and almost got a ticket. The CHP officer explained that, in California, pedestrians were an endangered species, so they had laws to protect them.

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Not at all. I cities in California (at that time, many years ago) pedestrians had the right of way at intersections with cross walks and no traffic lights.

That's true in NY as well as the other Tri-States, I think.

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Not at all. In cities in California (at that time, many years ago) pedestrians had the right of way at intersections with cross walks and no traffic lights.

That is still the case. When I first moved to California, I didn't know that and almost got a ticket. The CHP officer explained that, in California, pedestrians were an endangered species, so they had laws to protect them.

Was Charley Chips fooling or was he serious.

ruveyn

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When I first moved to California, I didn't know that and almost got a ticket. The CHP officer explained that, in California, pedestrians were an endangered species, so they had laws to protect them.

Was Charley Chips fooling or was he serious.

I think he was informing me of the law in a cute and entertaining way.

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Too bad Charley and the rest of them don't realize that there are a lot more threats to humanity not being dealt with, especially in California.

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