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JohnRgt

How much faster are F1 cars?

12 posts in this topic

GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

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GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

What is "downforce"? Gravitation? or something else?

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GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

Team America! F-word Yeah!

I must admit a got a slight adolescent tightening of the groin from that.

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GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

Team America! F-word Yeah!

I must admit I got a slight adolescent tightening of the groin from seeing Muslims being sent to their dates with 72 dark eyed virgins.

GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

Team America! F-word Yeah!

I must admit a got a slight adolescent tightening of the groin from that.

Ooops. I mean that for one of the follower youtubes showing a Taliban camp being taken out by a TOW missile

ruveyn

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GT, racing series that are based on productions cars, doesn't even come close:

Looks like that downforce stuff really works . . . :)

What is "downforce"? Gravitation? or something else?

Aerodynamic downforce.

These cars are the product of billions and billions of cutting edge aero work. The downforce keeps them glued to the tarmac, making it possible for them to run tracks at unimaginable speeds. (An Indy car can "weigh" as much as four times its standing weight in a banked turn.)

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Aerodynamic downforce.

These cars are the product of billions and billions of cutting edge aero work. The downforce keeps them glued to the tarmac, making it possible for them to run tracks at unimaginable speeds. (An Indy car can "weigh" as much as four times its standing weight in a banked turn.)

Ah! Negative lift produced by inverted airfoil. Thank you.

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And heaven help you if your suction cup unsticks. Because of the unnatural behaviour of the cars (unnatural from a car without down-force), one cannot estimate the actions of speed based on momentum and one-G weight. I prefer to see the cars go sideways under observable parameters. You cannot estimate suction, but you can estimate the behaviour of a car without it. While understanding that suction helps 'stick', that doesn't make it a pleasure to watch for me.

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Didn't they use to use more downforce, though? I thought they reigned it in a while ago because the speeds they started to attain during turns were becoming too dangerous. But yeah, it looks like they're following a Shinkansen track.

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And heaven help you if your suction cup unsticks. Because of the unnatural behaviour of the cars (unnatural from a car without down-force), one cannot estimate the actions of speed based on momentum and one-G weight. I prefer to see the cars go sideways under observable parameters. You cannot estimate suction, but you can estimate the behaviour of a car without it. While understanding that suction helps 'stick', that doesn't make it a pleasure to watch for me.

Strictly speaking there is no "suction". There is only "blowction":.

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Aerodynamic downforce.

These cars are the product of billions and billions of cutting edge aero work. The downforce keeps them glued to the tarmac, making it possible for them to run tracks at unimaginable speeds. (An Indy car can "weigh" as much as four times its standing weight in a banked turn.)

Ah! Negative lift produced by inverted airfoil. Thank you.

No, you people use negative downforce by inverted airfoil . . .

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And heaven help you if your suction cup unsticks. Because of the unnatural behaviour of the cars (unnatural from a car without down-force), one cannot estimate the actions of speed based on momentum and one-G weight. I prefer to see the cars go sideways under observable parameters. You cannot estimate suction, but you can estimate the behaviour of a car without it. While understanding that suction helps 'stick', that doesn't make it a pleasure to watch for me.

On the whole, I agree. It's very difficult to get a sense for these velocities.

But next year F1 will run a race on road course here in NY Metro. I will be spending some time on those roads before the race and, hopefully, be able to relate to what I'll be seeing in person.

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Didn't they use to use more downforce, though? I thought they reigned it in a while ago because the speeds they started to attain during turns were becoming too dangerous. But yeah, it looks like they're following a Shinkansen track.

They've also adjusted the rules to make these events more about driver's skill. (When hard braking extracts droplets of moisture from the driver's eye ball slamming the against his visor, you know things are extreme . . . )

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