Olivier_N

New Double Major- Somewhat Intimidating

13 posts in this topic

I was originally an accounting major. Then I was an accounting major with a minor in economics. Now I am an accounting/economics double major. I am passionate about both subjects, and have done very well class-wise thus far. I am, however, somewhat intimidated by the double major. I have no problem putting the time and effort forth to complete it, but it still seems like a serious endeavor.

Does anyone have general feedback to give related to these two majors, double majoring, etc? I'd love to hear it.

Also, I plan on completing the 150 necessary hours and passing the CPA exam.

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The only issue is how many different courses are required for each major and whether you can fit them into a workable course load. Talk with your college advisors and see what you can work out.

Also, look at the reasons why you want a double major. There is always the possibility of majoring in Accounting to get your CPA, taking as many econ classes as you can as electives, and continuing to study econ after graduation either in an MBA program or on your own.


I was a Philosophy major at the University of Pennsylvania with a Finance and Accounting minor in the Wharton School and there were NO courses I could apply to both as there might be with accounting and economics. Still I was able to complete everything in 3 years (including summer school) while working two concurrent part-time jobs. With some background in accounting, I was able to learn a lot more on the job after graduation.

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The only issue is how many different courses are required for each major and whether you can fit them into a workable course load. Talk with your college advisors and see what you can work out.

Also, look at the reasons why you want a double major. There is always the possibility of majoring in Accounting to get your CPA, taking as many econ classes as you can as electives, and continuing to study econ after graduation either in an MBA program or on your own.

I was a Philosophy major at the University of Pennsylvania with a Finance and Accounting minor in the Wharton School and there were NO courses I could apply to both as there might be with accounting and economics. Still I was able to complete everything in 3 years (including summer school) while working two concurrent part-time jobs. With some background in accounting, I was able to learn a lot more on the job after graduation.

Thanks for your input. The reason I added an Econ major (aside from my passion for the subject) is that I am required to take 150 credits to take the CPA exam anyway, so I may as well get two degrees while I am at it. Otherwise, I would have an accounting degree and take a lot of classes that I really don't need.

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Thanks for your input. The reason I added an Econ major (aside from my passion for the subject) is that I am required to take 150 credits to take the CPA exam anyway, so I may as well get two degrees while I am at it. Otherwise, I would have an accounting degree and take a lot of classes that I really don't need.

If you are taking economics courses required for your accounting degree then you need them whether or not you get an economics degree. But beyond the requirements, don't dismiss any course you take in which you learn about a subject of interest to you as something you "don't need". You are there for what you can learn; a degree only serves as an official confirmation that you did the minimum required for some particular realm.

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Thanks for your input. The reason I added an Econ major (aside from my passion for the subject) is that I am required to take 150 credits to take the CPA exam anyway, so I may as well get two degrees while I am at it. Otherwise, I would have an accounting degree and take a lot of classes that I really don't need.

If you are taking economics courses required for your accounting degree then you need them whether or not you get an economics degree. But beyond the requirements, don't dismiss any course you take in which you learn about a subject of interest to you as something you "don't need". You are there for what you can learn; a degree only serves as an official confirmation that you did the minimum required for some particular realm.

Oh I absolutely agree. I apologize if I gave the impression that I do not value learning. I LOVE economics.

My only true concern is overloading my course responsibilities. To sum it up, I have a fear of failure (which is rational, I suppose).

I appreciate the response.

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The only issue is how many different courses are required for each major and whether you can fit them into a workable course load. Talk with your college advisors and see what you can work out.

Also, look at the reasons why you want a double major. There is always the possibility of majoring in Accounting to get your CPA, taking as many econ classes as you can as electives, and continuing to study econ after graduation either in an MBA program or on your own.

I was a Philosophy major at the University of Pennsylvania with a Finance and Accounting minor in the Wharton School and there were NO courses I could apply to both as there might be with accounting and economics. Still I was able to complete everything in 3 years (including summer school) while working two concurrent part-time jobs. With some background in accounting, I was able to learn a lot more on the job after graduation.

Wow! That's impressive! How did you manage all those things at once?

Have you found a cure for sleep? :D

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Wow! That's impressive! How did you manage all those things at once?

Have you found a cure for sleep? :D

I slept an average of three hours a night and took naps between classes. I also made deals with professors who taught straight from the textbook that I would skip classes and just show up for the midterm and final.

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They wouldn't let you use a chair in the lecture hall to sleep like half the rest of them?

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They wouldn't let you use a chair in the lecture hall to sleep like half the rest of them?

They often sat us in alphabetical order and my last name started with "B." It's hard to get away with napping in class when you're sitting in the front row. :rolleyes:

Fortunately my friend Nick B. -- You know him -- was a physics grad student who let me use the extra desk in his office for naps.

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The office in the basement with the liquid nitrogen?

The office on the main floor of Dietrich Hall that he shared with a Japanese guy and a fat, bearded liberal whose wife was an attorney licensed to practice in Louisiana.

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Wow! That's impressive! How did you manage all those things at once?

Have you found a cure for sleep? :D

I slept an average of three hours a night and took naps between classes. I also made deals with professors who taught straight from the textbook that I would skip classes and just show up for the midterm and final.

That's a good idea. Talking to the professors. I wish I could manage three hours of sleep a night, but i'd completely lose my marbles.

I'm looking at how to manage law school and a full time job, not wanting to compromise any of them. The biggest problem is the lectures and seminars where you have to attend. The school board tells me you can't skip that, but the professors may be easier to negotiate with.

Speaking of wich, perhaps I can offer a little advice or reassurance to Olivier. If you can manage the practical details like attending enough classes, then it's a matter of "just do it". Being two places at once is impossible, but making time to study is not.

I've been studying and working full time, with lots of overtime, for the last 6 months. Because I don't have to attend any classes it's actually quite easy. Of course there has been a few all nighters and times where i've had to lug books around everywhere I go, so I have enough time to read, but most of the time it's not a problem at all.

The most important thing is being able to manage your time. For example when you work during the day and study on weekends and evenings, that's easy. It's a lot harder if you need to attend two classes at once. Find a way around that problem, if you can, and go for it! :)

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Wow! That's impressive! How did you manage all those things at once?

Have you found a cure for sleep? :D

I slept an average of three hours a night and took naps between classes. I also made deals with professors who taught straight from the textbook that I would skip classes and just show up for the midterm and final.

That's a good idea. Talking to the professors. I wish I could manage three hours of sleep a night, but i'd completely lose my marbles.

I'm looking at how to manage law school and a full time job, not wanting to compromise any of them. The biggest problem is the lectures and seminars where you have to attend. The school board tells me you can't skip that, but the professors may be easier to negotiate with.

Speaking of wich, perhaps I can offer a little advice or reassurance to Olivier. If you can manage the practical details like attending enough classes, then it's a matter of "just do it". Being two places at once is impossible, but making time to study is not.

I've been studying and working full time, with lots of overtime, for the last 6 months. Because I don't have to attend any classes it's actually quite easy. Of course there has been a few all nighters and times where i've had to lug books around everywhere I go, so I have enough time to read, but most of the time it's not a problem at all.

The most important thing is being able to manage your time. For example when you work during the day and study on weekends and evenings, that's easy. It's a lot harder if you need to attend two classes at once. Find a way around that problem, if you can, and go for it! :)

Thanks for all of your responses. I am gaining confidence as time goes on, particularly because I know I am passionate about both subjects.

And I like the "just do it" mentality. That's my main motto with regard to school work.

So long as I avoid distractions (which I am getting much better at), I should be fine.

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