MichaelJ

Happy 4th of July to all Americans

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I would like to wish each American a happy 4th of July. There are many holidays that I would dispute the value or meaning of it, but this is one that even though I am a foreigner, I hold in high regard and deeply respect. It is a holiday that celebrates a high value to me, the birth of liberty in this world.

In the short time in human history that America has been around, the strange concept of liberty that it pioneered and the founders concretised in their nation has demonstrated to man just what is possible on this Earth.

During its entire existence, America has served as a guiding light to the world. To each man who chooses to think and wants something better for his life, America stands as a living monument that says "It is possible, come here and try!"

I would also like to take this time in this post to thank each American who defends liberty and therefore, the principles of America, whether through the military or philosophically so that this nation still stands.

Thank you

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I would like to wish each American a happy 4th of July. There are many holidays that I would dispute the value or meaning of it, but this is one that even though I am a foreigner, I hold in high regard and deeply respect. It is a holiday that celebrates a high value to me, the birth of liberty in this world.

In the short time in human history that America has been around, the strange concept of liberty that it pioneered and the founders concretised in their nation has demonstrated to man just what is possible on this Earth.

During its entire existence, America has served as a guiding light to the world. To each man who chooses to think and wants something better for his life, America stands as a living monument that says "It is possible, come here and try!"

I would also like to take this time in this post to thank each American who defends liberty and therefore, the principles of America, whether through the military or philosophically so that this nation still stands.

Thank you

What a lovely tribute you wrote, Michael. You may not live here, but you sure are an American in spirit. My thanks go to you.

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Wow another Australian who doesnt feel it necessary to be critical of America, I am amazed :D

Your tribute re-iterates how I feel about America, I would also like to wish a happy 4th of July to all Americans on this board :D

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I would also like to wish you all a very happy 4th of July! Never forget the power and the reach of the American message. It changed my life, and it will change countless others, no matter how far in the world.

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What a lovely tribute you wrote, Michael. You may not live here, but you sure are an American in spirit. My thanks go to you.

Thank you. That statement coming from you, I consider to be a high honour.

I hope to someday make America my home. I am in the process of saving up to get my GED(I had dropped out of school to run my business) in order to meet one of the requirements of US immigration. :)

One of the goals of my life that I really want to achieve is to someday become a US citizen.

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Thank you. That statement coming from you, I consider to be a high honour.

I hope to someday make America my home. I am in the process of saving up to get my GED(I had dropped out of school to run my business) in order to meet one of the requirements of US immigration. :)

One of the goals of my life that I really want to achieve is to someday become a US citizen.

Michael,

With values like those from you last post, America and Americans should welcome you with open arms. I look forward to the day when you achieve your values.

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One of the goals of my life that I really want to achieve is to someday become a US citizen.

Why?

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One of the goals of my life that I really want to achieve is to someday become a US citizen.

Why?

He doesn't care about Australian beach bunnies.

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Here is what Glenn beck wrote about July 4th in his email newsletter:

July 3, 2009

Hello America,

Here it is, another Fourth of July. Traditionally, this is a day to gather with friends, maybe fire up the barbeque and play with kids until the sun sets and the fireworks start. But in thinking back on the meaning behind this day, we must never forget that our nation was baptized in the blaze of a very different kind of "fireworks." Yes, this is a day of rest and relaxation, as well it should be, but this year…I'd like to ask you a favor. At some point during the day, I hope you'll take time to think and reflect on what it is we're truly celebrating on the 4th of July -- our Independence Day. Of course the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4th, 1776 but it's so much more than that. On this day, 233 short years ago, a small group of men dedicated themselves to a higher purpose, an ideal they believed in so greatly, they signed their name to its expression and in doing so put their very lives at risk.

Never has a simple act of signing one's name carried such weight, such a profound commitment. By signing the Declaration of Independence, 56 men stood in direct defiance of the British government. They became marked men, and willingly so. As I was doing some research on the significance of July 4th, I came across some interesting facts about these men. Today as we all enjoy the freedom our forefathers guaranteed us, join me in honoring the extraordinary sacrifice of 56 extraordinary Americans.

Of the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence:

Five were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes burned to the ground. Two lost sons serving in the Revolutionary Army, and two more had sons captured. Nine fought and died in the Revolutionary War.

If you ever feel like your lone voice can never be heard, that the political system isn't set up for "regular" Americans to change the course of history, remember: The signers were flesh and blood, mortal men with a divinely-inspired aim.

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists, eleven were merchants, and nine were farmers and large plantation owners. They were well educated, smart enough to know that by signing the Declaration of Independence, they were signing their own death warrants. They did it anyway, and God bless them for it.

As we enjoy our liberty on this 4th of July, or any day of any month, we must never take that liberty for granted. Too many have given too much. In the words of the Signers themselves, "For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor."

Their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor -- I think that's a price paid worth a few minutes of reflection, don't you? But let's not be solemn in that reflection. I say rejoice and share this information with your friends and family, especially your kids. The Signers asked for nothing in return for their pledge, but I say that we show our thanks with a pledge of our own: To remember, to be grateful, and to carry on in their spirit. America is the greatest country this world has ever and will ever know, and it will stay that way so long as "we the people" remember that just like in 1776.

It's US that surrounds them, and we'll never back down.

Happy Independence Day, and God bless America.

Glenn

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He doesn't care about Australian beach bunnies.

Well, I thought it would be for some serious reason, like wanting to buy some scenic property in Maine while being free of enviro-socialist government interference or eventually building a company to IPO without a raft of laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley, or the strong, non-inflating dollar, or a freedom-loving federal government whose head executive, voted in by a large majority of like-minded individuals, is notoriously pro-capitalist, and anti-taxation. All of those, and many more, are certainly in America's favor. ;)

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He doesn't care about Australian beach bunnies.

Well, I thought it would be for some serious reason, like wanting to buy some scenic property in Maine while being free of enviro-socialist government interference or eventually building a company to IPO without a raft of laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley, or the strong, non-inflating dollar, or a freedom-loving federal government whose head executive, voted in by a large majority of like-minded individuals, is notoriously pro-capitalist, and anti-taxation. All of those, and many more, are certainly in America's favor. ;)

I cannot speak for myself, but one of my main reasons for wanting to come to America is that I like being surrounded by positive and upbeat people!

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I cannot speak for myself

That should read "I cannot speak for Michael." Apparently, I'm too sleep-deprived to be able to speak even for myself right now... ;)

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I cannot speak for myself

That should read "I cannot speak for Michael." Apparently, I'm too sleep-deprived to be able to speak even for myself right now... ;)

;);)

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I can [only] speak for myself, but one of my main reasons for wanting to come to America is that I like being surrounded by positive and upbeat people!

As long as you aren't associating with the constantly increasing number of individuals whose lives have been very negatively affected by cancerous governments voted in democratically. I can't help thinking of the monstrous injustices perpetrated by them onto innocent individuals (e.g. to ewv) when I read some unconditionally enthusiastic desire to move here.

That said, my reply *was* overly negative. Pursuing values is still possible in America and I am doing so. But I don't dismiss that the setting of Atlas Shrugged was in America, not some other country, and the ruthless logic of the progress of decline given certain ideas as evidenced by actual events is now so obvious that even average men discuss the association now, if not (unfortunately) the logic that predicted it.

I haven't done an enormous amount of international travel but I would not call the inhabitants of New Zealand or Singapore negative and downbeat, nor have I heard that Australia is that way either. It isn't at all clear to me that America is a better place to live than Australia now, hence my question to Michael, which I wouldn't have asked if I'd noticed that his remark was 4 years old and may well have changed since America eagerly voted in a devout Marxist and his minions.

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I can [only] speak for myself, but one of my main reasons for wanting to come to America is that I like being surrounded by positive and upbeat people!

As long as you aren't associating with the constantly increasing number of individuals whose lives have been very negatively affected by cancerous governments voted in democratically. I can't help thinking of the monstrous injustices perpetrated by them onto innocent individuals (e.g. to ewv) when I read some unconditionally enthusiastic desire to move here.

That said, my reply *was* overly negative. Pursuing values is still possible in America and I am doing so. But I don't dismiss that the setting of Atlas Shrugged was in America, not some other country, and the ruthless logic of the progress of decline given certain ideas as evidenced by actual events is now so obvious that even average men discuss the association now, if not (unfortunately) the logic that predicted it.

I haven't done an enormous amount of international travel but I would not call the inhabitants of New Zealand or Singapore negative and downbeat, nor have I heard that Australia is that way either. It isn't at all clear to me that America is a better place to live than Australia now, hence my question to Michael, which I wouldn't have asked if I'd noticed that his remark was 4 years old and may well have changed since America eagerly voted in a devout Marxist and his minions.

My personal observations are that one can live here with freedom, and I have not seen quite the viciousness that ewv has encountered. I was not born here, and have lived on three continents for roughly equal thirds of my life. I think Australians have inherited an independent and irreverent streak, since they were originally outcasts from the establishment. While the country had it's beginnings heavily influenced with socialistic ideas, it is decidedly less so at present, despite having an Obama "light" for PM. The irony is that in the past 50 years the trends between our two countries have moved in the opposite direction. Still, I think that there is a core of the US population that appreciates it's heritage and freedom more than I see it displayed here. One does see more and more flag flying here, but not as much as in the USA. I think there is still enough good in the USA to put this awful period behind and embrace the wonderful optimism of the 50's once again.

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I don't dismiss that the setting of Atlas Shrugged was in America, not some other country

Do you consider America to be philosophically worse than other countries?

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Do you consider America to be philosophically worse than other countries?

In some ways, probably yes. Environmentalism, multiculturalism, pragmatism, egalitarianism, and Christianity are all extremely destructive. I think that there are countries which are not as afflicted with these, but of course those countries have a different set of problems. Environmentalism and multiculturalism are paving the way for the self-destruction of the country; the first by direct internal action, the second by annihilating any moral confidence about properly identifying the dealing with enemies. Pragmatism is a direct assault on thinking-by-principle. Egalitarianism supports the growing anti-wealth/anti-success/anti-excellence sentiments. Christianity is another assault on clear thinking and reality focus, and a major source of altruism. I could go on but there's little point in that.

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Do you consider America to be philosophically worse than other countries?

In some ways, probably yes.

I'd agree that in some specific aspects, there are other countries that are not as corrupt, but looking at the overall picture, I think America is still by far the best (well, least bad). For example, in most countries, people accept tax increases without a peep, and it would never occur to them to organize protests against taxation named after an event that started a revolution. Also, America is the only country where there is an Institute dedicated to systematically countering the irrational ideas you mentioned, and spreading a pro-reason, pro-self philosophy.

In my country, Hungary, environmentalism and multiculturalism may not be as entrenched as in America, but they are growing in influence and are trying to entrench themselves. There is only one way I see the trend being stopped and reversed: by more rational ideas being imported from America.

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Do you consider America to be philosophically worse than other countries?

In some ways, probably yes.

I'd agree that in some specific aspects, there are other countries that are not as corrupt, but looking at the overall picture, I think America is still by far the best (well, least bad). For example, in most countries, people accept tax increases without a peep, and it would never occur to them to organize protests against taxation named after an event that started a revolution. Also, America is the only country where there is an Institute dedicated to systematically countering the irrational ideas you mentioned, and spreading a pro-reason, pro-self philosophy.

In my country, Hungary, environmentalism and multiculturalism may not be as entrenched as in America, but they are growing in influence and are trying to entrench themselves. There is only one way I see the trend being stopped and reversed: by more rational ideas being imported from America.

Just to add to what CF wrote, in my experience, America still has the best sense-of-life of any country in the world and the most developed political apparatus (a robust constitutional republic, even if flawed and betrayed by some). It also has the most developed economy.

The countries which, to my knowledge, come close in any aspect are:

i) China (including Hong Kong and Taiwan), whose economy is catching up quickly (see the latest reports on car sales and currency reserves). But, China is a dictatorship. It recognizes a significant number of economic rights, but very few political rights. However, significantly, Hong Kong and Taiwan may have better healthcare systems than the U.S.

ii) Australia may have a similar sense-of-life but has almost no private universities and no "national memory" of true liberty, so her citizens are unlikely to be able to fully know what the Left have done, or are doing, to destroy her.

iii) New Zealand has a rising capitalist profile but is very similar to Australia in many respects.

iv) Canada has lower corporate taxes; better educated (and behaved) children; a neighbor's benefit of hindsight in respect to the U.S.; and the growing influence of immigrants from Hong Kong and mainland China (who favor economic rights). But, Canada is torn between the European and American cultures. While Canada's economy was, in the early 20th century, identical to the U.S.'s in many respects, the European influence, from France (via Montreal) and from Britain (historically), has wrecked whatever sense-of-life there may have been in that country. Away from the big cities, there are still many, many similarities to the U.S., but, owing to Canada's proximity to the U.S., most of the best Canadians have been able to immigrate (or relocate) to the U.S., or, at least, functionally operate as U.S. citizens. Like Australia, Canada has almost no private universities. Canada can be viewed, in many ways, as a 51st U.S. state which the Left managed to "remove" from the U.S. The only part of Canada which bucks this entire view is Alberta, which is essentially a satelite of Texas, since many Texans move to Alberta because of the oil industry there. (Notably, Alberta has consistently voted Conservative for over a half-century.) The most "Chinese" part of Canada is Vancouver, British Columbia, which, while in the process of lowering taxes considerably, is still in the grip of the old-school NDP communist (now viro) machine.

v) Singapore has a more rigorous adherence to law and order because of the draconian measures the state employs. But, adherence to (the rule of) law and order promises neither an objective method of creating law nor an objective method of meting justice.

Compare these to the United States of America: land of Ayn Rand. Land of Jefferson, Franklin, Adams, and Henry. Land of Ford, Edison, Carnegie, Morgan, Lynch, Vanderbilt, and Rockefeller. Land of Washington, Sherman, Patton, and MacArthur. Land of Rand and Rachmaninoff. Land of Hollywood, Broadway, and Nashville. Land of Vegas, Miami, Orlando, and San Diego. The only country which has ever recognized and practiced Free Speech (see talk radio and the uncensored World Wide Web). She is truly the land of gold, milk and honey, and even her most vicious, most tenacious enemies - foreign and domestic - fear that she will rise again through her clean, industrious people (citizen and immigrant alike) and swat her foes like the feeble flies that they indeed are.

If there be a God, he must indeed have blessed - and would bless - this great land, and her great people.

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He doesn't care about Australian beach bunnies.

Well, I thought it would be for some serious reason, like wanting to buy some scenic property in Maine while being free of enviro-socialist government interference or eventually building a company to IPO without a raft of laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley, or the strong, non-inflating dollar, or a freedom-loving federal government whose head executive, voted in by a large majority of like-minded individuals, is notoriously pro-capitalist, and anti-taxation. All of those, and many more, are certainly in America's favor. ;)

I cannot speak for myself, but one of my main reasons for wanting to come to America is that I like being surrounded by positive and upbeat people!

A student I know very well who was born and raised in Europe says that Americans are different because we are very positive people who--when confronted with a problem--actually actively trying to solve it instead of sitting around discussing it forever.

This person also said Americans were very different in that we look at situations (moral) in terms of black and white, whereas for the European it's basically all grey.

Because I'm in grad school, 99% of my colleagues and basically 99% of the people I spend my time with every day are foreign. After this last year I cannot emphasize enough how profoundly individualistic and selfish Americans are compared to these other people.

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