Roger Fusselman

South Korea: Any Objectivists there?

11 posts in this topic

Hey!

I'm an Objectivist who recently moved back to South Korea. I'm looking for Objectivists.

Things have been pretty good lately for Objectivism. The five-volume translation of "Atlas" was published about a year or two ago, as was a new translation of "The Romantic Manifesto." I tell ya, this philosophy can catch on.

Who's out there?

Roger

in Pohang

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I'm an Objectivist who recently moved back to South Korea. I'm looking for Objectivists.... The five-volume translation of "Atlas" was published about a year or two ago ...

Roger, sorry I cannot help with contacts in South Korea, but that five-volume (!) translation sure got my attention. Is there an expansion of wording due to translating English single-words into Korean phrases?

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Do you know where one could buy that 5 volume set of Atlas? I know somebody from Korea who might like it. (And I'm also interested in your answer to Stephen about why it's so large..)

In answer to your question though, I don't know of any Objectivists there.

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Do you know where one could buy that 5 volume set of Atlas? I know somebody from Korea who might like it. (And I'm also interested in your answer to Stephen about why it's so large..)

This seller sells it. You'll notice that each volume is less than have the length of the English version. I really struggled with the physical reading, given the type size, and in Hangul I can imagine it really would not be possible to print so tiny (not to mention the fact that Korean verbs are just longer than English).

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And by "have", I mean "half".

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This seller sells it. You'll notice that each volume is less than have the length of the English version. I really struggled with the physical reading, given the type size, and in Hangul I can imagine it really would not be possible to print so tiny (not to mention the fact that Korean verbs are just longer than English).

Thanks, Dave. I assume you meant that you read some or all of it and thus you can read Korean; what is your assessment of the accuracy and quality of the translation?

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I assume you meant that you read some or all of it and thus you can read Korean; what is your assessment of the accuracy and quality of the translation?
I've never seen the Korean version. I see the ambiguity in what I said -- I struggled with the English print version because of the small type. My guestimation about the Korean version is based on some low-level professionally acquired knowledge of Korean structure and a quick and dirty test of physical space of equivalent side-by-side English / Korean Hangul texts. I have no idea what the quality of the translation is.

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My guestimation about the Korean version is based on some low-level professionally acquired knowledge of Korean structure and a quick and dirty test of physical space of equivalent side-by-side English / Korean Hangul texts.

Well, that's not true. The publisher is Minumsa, and the translators are native-speaking Koreans. Their Korean would be excellent. Given that Hangul is a bit large, it would take about five hardcover volumes of about 350 pages each to translate this. Galt's speech comes out to just over 100 pages. It does not appear as if they left anything out, although certainly a coherent, consistent translation would have to take its liberties with the original.

Korean translators nowadays seem to be doing very well. I found the Korean translation of "Those who fight for the future, live in it today" in "The Romantic Manifesto." The translation, when translated back into English, seemed to work well, and was very close to the original. I use this translated phrase at the end of my blogs, whenever I blog on Korea-related issues. (I blog in English under an ornithological monicker.) To read that phrase in my posts, you'd need Korean fonts, but the rest of the post would be in English.

Roger in Korea

Still hoping to find Objectivists here...

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Well, that's not true. The publisher is Minumsa, and the translators are native-speaking Koreans. Their Korean would be excellent. Given that Hangul is a bit large, it would take about five hardcover volumes of about 350 pages each to translate this.
What isn't true? I'm confused. I think what you said supports my explanation. The listed paginations are 439, 497, 436, 521 and 417, just a bit more than twice the page numbes of the English version. Anyhow, good luck with the search.

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From ARI's netpage on student clubs, I found the following:

Military

          Camp Red Cloud (CRC) Objectivist Group, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea

            Club Leader: Kevin Azar

            whoisjohngalt76@hotmail.com

Best regards,

Petter Sandstad

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           Camp Red Cloud (CRC) Objectivist Group, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea

how great!

S.Korea has recently come on my radar of hero worship.

I have heard that the country makes national heroes out of 1.eminent biologists 2.gamers.

Is that true? Any of the usual suspicious influences at work? Please tell more...

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