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JRoberts

Homer Reborn

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Homer Reborn is a blog network created by me-Jason Roberts. Its goal is to bring back the Classical world-to show the relevance not only of Aristotle or Sophocles, but Thucydides, Homer, Herodotus, Plutarch, Polybius, Cato, etc.-a wide list of invaluable tools, admirable heroes who can help us (yes, even Objectivist!) in many ways.

Currently, Homer Reborn is split into two sections: Letters From An Enthusiast (written by Jason Roberts), with a focus on history and politics; and The Inner Temple (written by Travis West, aka. Cicero), with a focus on philosophy.

I encourage everyone to come over and witness the importance of the Classical works-it does a body good.

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Homer Reborn is a blog network created by me-Jason Roberts.  Its goal is to bring back the Classical world-to show the relevance not only of Aristotle or Sophocles, but Thucydides, Homer, Herodotus, Plutarch, Polybius, Cato, etc.-a wide list of invaluable tools, admirable heroes who can help us (yes, even Objectivist!) in many ways.

I think you have chosen a project that is doubly valuable. The project represents your personal values and your philosophical values, that is, the particular personal values that everyone should value.

I do have two quick comments. First, from your description, I wonder if you are lauding not "the Classical world," but the best elements of the Classical world? For example, you name Aristotle but not Plato or the Sophists.

Second, was not Homer "archaic," rather than Classical, though his works were classics in the Greek world for more than one thousand years? I note also that you mention Polybius, who was Hellenistic rather than Classical period. Further, Plutarch was very late: perhaps c. 50 - c. 120 CE. If you are going to cover the Hellenistic period, you might consider adding the great scientists and mathematicians such as Archimedes (c. 287 - 212 BCE).

Perhaps you could consider describing your project in broader terms such as "the best of the Greco-Roman world" or "the best of ancient Greek and Roman culture."

Again, congratulations on choosing such a project -- precisely because it engages your values and has breath-taking scope.

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I think you have chosen a project that is doubly valuable. The project represents your personal values and your philosophical values, that is, the particular personal values that everyone should value.

Thank you for your compliments Burgess. Indeed, this is a very personal project of immense value. I hope that it can become a value to other people too.

I do have two quick comments. First, from your description, I wonder if you are lauding not "the Classical world," but the best elements of the Classical world? For example, you name Aristotle but not Plato or the Sophists.

When I say Classical World, I mean the "essence" of the Classical World. The essence is: "what was it all about?" Of course in all societies there are bad elements. But I focus on the general sum. I also did not name an exhaustive list (by any means! :D )-but just a few examples of the great people. What I mean, however, is that there is value to be found-in everything, be it good or bad. I find value in Plato, positive and negative.

Second, was not Homer "archaic," rather than Classical, though his works were classics in the Greek world for more than one thousand years? I note also that you mention Polybius, who was Hellenistic rather than Classical period. Further, Plutarch was very late: perhaps c. 50 - c. 120 CE. If you are going to cover the Hellenistic period, you might consider adding the great scientists and mathematicians such as Archimedes (c. 287 - 212 BCE).

Perhaps you could consider describing your project in broader terms such as "the best of the Greco-Roman world" or "the best of ancient Greek and Roman culture."

Again, congratulations on choosing such a project -- precisely because it engages your values and has breath-taking scope.

I also took Classical as a very broad term. The best example I can offer is my Major: Classics. A person who gets this degree is called a Classicist. However, this general term archs over everything that you have described. That is why I chose the name.

I hope I have answered your questions-but thanks for asking them (I love to be kept on my toes :D )!

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I just wanted to give everybody a general update on what has been happening over at Homer Reborn. We've been very busy lately!

I started a series entitled "Life's Lessons", which analyses different fables of Aesop. The first discusses the importance of thought before action. The second discusses how humans are defined by their actions as opposed to merely what they proclaim.

Our first Feature Article, by Jeff Luebcke, entitled "Republican Generals", is a fascinating article. It compares two generals under a Republic (one Ancient, one semi-modern), and explains why a general who fights for a Republic doesn't lose. A must read!

My article, "Soft Around the Edges", explains how we as Americans must not be "soft" when it comes to China by explaining a similar situation in Ancient Greece.

Two more Feature articles, more philosophical in nature, as well as a new article discussing Russia and Putin are on the way. Be sure to check them out!

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My alias is “H. Acstonus.”

"H" as in "Hugh?"

I didn't get that at first. Cute.

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"H" as in "Hugh?"

I didn't get that at first.  Cute.

Yep, you got it :).

Acstonus is a "latinized" form of Akston.

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Due to a variety of factors, I pushed my blog aside for about 1.5 years. However, I recently feel like I finally have the time to resume blogging.

To commemorate my return, I have included two articles which I have written concerning Plato. The first, Plato's Revolution, examines the historical shift in philosophy from the outward world (the gods, nature), to the inward self. The second, Dr. Me, shows the implications of this shift in regards to psychological self-examination (I can look within and solve my own problems).

I have also just written a critique of a very popular trend in today's world: the comparison between the demise of the Roman Empire and the "demise" of America.

I encourage everybody to go check it out the new Homer Reborn!

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Due to a variety of factors, I pushed my blog aside for about 1.5 years. However, I recently feel like I finally have the time to resume blogging.

To commemorate my return, I have included two articles which I have written concerning Plato. The first, Plato's Revolution, examines the historical shift in philosophy from the outward world (the gods, nature), to the inward self. The second, Dr. Me, shows the implications of this shift in regards to psychological self-examination (I can look within and solve my own problems).

I have also just written a critique of a very popular trend in today's world: the comparison between the demise of the Roman Empire and the "demise" of America.

I encourage everybody to go check it out the new Homer Reborn!

It was extremely good and I hope to read more from this blog :)

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It was extremely good and I hope to read more from this blog :)

Thank you very much Joshua :).

I should be posting something new either tonight or tomorrow.

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It's nice to see Homer Reborn reborn :)

He never died-he just faded out for awhile :)

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