Joss Delage

Most taxed substance in the (known) universe?

6 posts in this topic

I wonder what the most taxed substance on Earth is. There was a time in France where we used to say it was French gaz at the pump, but I don't know if this is true.

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I wonder what the most taxed substance on Earth is. There was a time in France where we used to say it was French gaz at the pump, but I don't know if this is true.
I would suggest looking at narcotics. The tax on controlled substances in Kansas is $200/gram, same in Texas and Tennessee (which suggests a uniform law in the US). There used to be a federal tax as well, but I can't find info on it at the moment.

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Pheraps. But also liquor and foreign food. There it can easily come up to 200 and 300 percent with taxes.
Yup. If I did the math right, the ethanol tax alone on a liter of distilled beverage in Norway is about $45, plus 24% mva.

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Intellectual Property? Here in the UK the law doesn't allow IP to depreciate over time so it is always taxed. A particular example in mind are Trade marks.

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I wonder what the most taxed substance on Earth is. There was a time in France where we used to say it was French gaz at the pump, but I don't know if this is true.

If my maths is correct, UK petrol taxes equate to about $7 a (US) gallon.

Now bear in mind the "greedy" oil companies receive 20%+ of that (depending on how the oil price varies) and the UK government get about 70-80% of it.

So varying between 300% and 400% tax

Which is not great, especially when the greens tell me, I need to pay for driving on the roads in addition to current taxes.

It's also utterly counter-productive, because apart from the obvious damage it does to the UK economy via excess taxation, it means that foreign road haulage firms can simply fill up in Calais, haul goods all around the UK, in lorries that don't have the same kind of environmental standards UK lorries are compelled to have, whilst at the same time, taking business (ie the haulage contracts) outside of the UK.

A simple, practical and real example of how high taxation is counter-productive, can have unforeseen consequences and harms the country that imposes it.

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