CoireFox

Hello all

10 posts in this topic

I have never actually introduced myself online before. I guess the best place to start would be to say that my name is Coire Fox. I am 18 years old attending Purdue University for philosophy, economics, and history. I first read Rand when I was a sophomore in high school. It was as if every question I had ever had about life and the universe had been answered. I still didn't know the answers, but I knew Rand could give me the tools to find them. I never believed in Santa Claus, and realized in sixth grade that I didn't believe in God. I say realized because up until that point I had never really considered it. I knew at a very early age that to be is to be moral, that every human action implied an act of moral judgment. I remember in middle school breaking up with the first girl I "went out with" because she laughed when I said I was going to join the Chess Club. I went to Montessori School for kindergarden. My mother said from an early age I loved to learn anything and everything. Going to public school and "bumpy" adolescent years ruined all that for me though. I am in the process of regaining my love for knowledge by following a supplementary education that I have created for myself--and I refuse to let my apathetic professors take it away from me as they did in middle school. I still have much integrating and learning to do to rid myself of incorrect thoughts and ideas. I was once a very different person, but am working hard to actualize all of my potential. Online Objectivist forums and the Objectivist Club here are aiding me greatly. I would like to thank Stephen for creating this forum and plan to gain from it immensely.

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I am in the process of regaining my love for knowledge by following a supplementary education that I have created for myself--and I refuse to let my apathetic professors take it away from me as they did in middle school. 

Good for you, Coire. I know exactly what you are talking about. Been there, done that. :angry: Always remember that people only have the value you place on them. Never let anyone murder the best within you.

I still have much integrating and learning to do to rid myself of incorrect thoughts and ideas.  I was once a very different person, but am working hard to actualize all of my potential.

Ridding oneself of incorrect integrations is a long process. We take in so much in childhood that we don't realize we've integrated. Such things can pop up when we least expect it. But there will come a time when you realize that the worst is over. It sounds like you've come a long way already.

One of the best ways I've found to find one's way back to the eager, wondering child you were before people went about brusing your brain is to take notice of the beauty in the world -- and there is a lot of it. Just watching a beautiful sunset can replentish your soul. Sounds trite, I know, but "smelling the roses" is valid. I also find beauty in accomplishment, and there are remarkable accomplishments to be appreciated these days. The computer you're sitting in front of, the Internet you've entered, and this very site you've logged into are three fine examples. I remember when programs were aired on television's 2 channels for only a few hours a day, and everybody who managed to have a telephone was on a party-line with at least two other people!

Welcome to the forum, Coire. I look forward to your participation.

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<snip>...and everybody who managed to have a telephone was on a party-line with at least two other people! 

It just dawned on me that I ought to qualify this statement, since to most young people the term "party-line" means somethings comepletely different than what I referred to. When people first began to get telephones in their homes, and for a long time afterward, they had to share their line with others. One had no idea who these others were. You'd pick up the phone and here some woman going on in great detail about her gall-bladder surgery! No kid was allowed to sit and chat the way they do today; phone manners demanded that calls were short so that you didn't tie up everyone's line. Now pictures of the incredible dork sitting next to you fly through the air to your best friend! Remarkable.

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You'd pick up the phone and here some woman going on in great detail about her gall-bladder surgery!

Oh, geez. Make that "hear", not here. That's the second such mistake I've made tonight. Time for bed.

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Yes, Janet, I think I have come a long way already. I immersed myself in Objectivism the moment I discovered it. I tended to do that a lot with new ideas on how to live my life, for what better way to test a system's validity than to apply it? It has been four years and I have read all of Rand's published books, some more than once and I understand more and more everyday.

One of the best ways I've found to find one's way back to the eager, wondering child you were before people went about brusing your brain is to take notice of the beauty in the world

It's funny you should mention this. I have become very aesthetically involved recently. I did not know why the desire to see and hear great works of art hit me so suddenly, but I think you hit the nail on the head.

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  I am in the process of regaining my love for knowledge by following a supplementary education that I have created for myself--and I refuse to let my apathetic professors take it away from me as they did in middle school...

... I still have much integrating and learning to do to rid myself of incorrect thoughts and ideas.  I was once a very different person, but am working hard to actualize all of my potential.  Online Objectivist forums and the Objectivist Club here are aiding me greatly.  I would like to thank Stephen for creating this forum and plan to gain from it immensely.

Pleased to meet you, Coire.

I have a special interest in how young people lose their eagerness to learn. As a young child I was actually conscious of the fact that school was the enemy of my love of learning, and I found my enthusiasm for building what I called a "Supermind" dwindling before my eyes. School's rigid schedule (which kept me from taking my time to explore and delve more deeply and to apply what I learned creatively - always a big motivator for my learning), and its overt "community" orientation whittled my drive way down from what it was, and I didn't get it back until I got away from school.

I've been writing a book about the child I was before school and what happened once I got in school. I believe it will be be very revealing of the potential that can be undermined because of the coercive and cookie-cutter nature of public school.

I'm sure that everyone here will be happy to cheer you on and help you in your quest to become the person you want to be. It's terrific that you've gotten such an early start on the project!

Cheers!

Sydney Kendall

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I have never actually introduced myself online before.  I guess the best place to start would be to say that my name is Coire Fox.  I am 18 years old attending Purdue University for philosophy, economics, and history.  I first read Rand when I was a sophomore in high school.  It was as if every question I had ever had about life and the universe had been answered.  I still didn't know the answers, but I knew Rand could give me the tools to find them. .

Hi, Coire! Good to meet someone else who lives in Indiana! I live in Louisville right now but lived the first 22 years of my life in Indiana. Believe it or not, you're the closest Objectivist I've seen to where I live. :angry:

I still have much integrating and learning to do to rid myself of incorrect thoughts and ideas.  I was once a very different person, but am working hard to actualize all of my potential.  Online Objectivist forums and the Objectivist Club here are aiding me greatly.  I would like to thank Stephen for creating this forum and plan to gain from it immensely.

It is a struggle. Bad premesies become so engrained sometimes that it can take years to be fully rid of them. I'm still working on this myself but I know I will do it. What has helped me imensely is forums like this one and OO and wonderful people who have answered questions I have posted.

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As a young child I was actually conscious of the fact that school was the enemy of my love of learning, and I found my enthusiasm for building what I called a "Supermind" dwindling before my eyes. School's rigid schedule, and its overt "community" orientation whittled my drive way down from what it was, and I didn't get it back until I got away from school.

This triggered a realization for me - I've never lost my love of learning, despite my public school education. I began to think about how, and I rememberd that, throughout my entire education, every time I reached the point where I understood what was being taught at the time, I would immediately tune out everything that followed. Sometimes I would just do my homework right then and there, or start reading a book, or just think about other things (it was never just "daydreaming"). It helped that I always grasped things very quickly, of course. And somehow I managed to pay enough "peripheral attention" to know when it was time to tune back in for something new.

This wouldn't be the only reason I retained my love of learning, but no doubt it helped.

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Hi Coire and everyone else, too!

Just wanted to say "Go Boilers!" My husband and I graduated from Purdue in the early 90s. We were involved in the Objectivist Club back then, too. I think the time I spent there was more valuable than my actual degree. I hope it's as enlightening now as it was then.

And I've found everyone's comments on how school can destroy one's love of learning so interesting. I'm very much in agreement. Although my love of learning never was actually completely killed off, I know that I always did my best learning outside of a school setting. I was always writing stories or inventing new things or reading our family set of encyclopediae. School was just something I did during the day. Learning happened at all kinds of odd times, and I'm glad my parents were good at encouraging that. To that end, we are not planning to send our kids to school.

I'll post a real live intro soon, but just couldn't resist adding a few thoughts to this thread.

~Jenn

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