JRoberts

Apple

117 posts in this topic

Well, that's good news. Did you already get your visa approved? (Since you left we have gotten a bit more strict on just who we let into Southern California.  :wacko: )

Visa? I will have you know, sir, I am a card-carrying resident of the People's State. Self-imposed exile does not change that fact.

On Saturday I am going to the grand opening of that Apple store you located, and I can check to see if they have space available. That way you would not ever have to worry about being connected!  :blink:

Privacy or a 30 inch monitor. Hmmm. Privacy. 30 inch monitor. That is a really tough decision. Privacy. 30 inch monitor.

Let me get back to you on that one.

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Visa?  I will have you know, sir, I am a card-carrying resident of the People's State.  Self-imposed exile does not change that fact.

Ha! You haven't checked the writing on that card recently, have you? The card is printed with special inks that disassociate once they are subject to any climate different from that in Southern California. Especially Eastern climates!

p.s. This is cute but we are highjacking a nice thread on Apple in THE GOOD, so you can have the last laugh if you like.

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I have not yet gotten to the Apple store, so this new one is certainly the one of choice. Perhaps this weekend.

The grand opening was today, Saturday, and I arrived at the new Apple store at 9:45am, 15 minutes before opening. I was shocked to see that a line had already formed, meandering almost half-way through the mall! Security guards were erecting rope barriers to cordon off those waiting from the regular shoppers. I decided to leave and try again later. Even after an hour the lines were still quite long, but those on the line were fun people so I queued up. Things moved pretty quickly and I was rewarded with a really cool Apple T-shirt. :wacko:

The Apple store was large with ample display of all Apple-ware. I was struck by the lovely design apparent in each product. The G5 was beautiful, what with its sleek integrated look, remote control, and see-through speakers. I checked out the 20" display, and later the 23" and 30" displays for the tower machines, trying different font styles with different sizes. I was pleasantly surprised by the crisp quality of the text on the 23" monitor, despite the fact that the stated resolution was essentially the same as an LCD monitor I had returned because the text lacked readability. I'm not sure why the Apple monitor appears so much better for plain text.

Unfortunately, I was told you cannot add a second monitor to the G5, but you can for the tower systems. I was also surprised when told that Apple does not supply conversion tools for switching from Intel, like incorporating the outlook.pst file into the Apple system. The Apple tech said, however, that there exists third-party software to do just that. I don't think I would switch from Windows to the Apple system, but I will definitely look at them again when the Intel-driven Apple comes out.

the iPod displays really astounded me. In my naivete I had assumed that iPods were just good for listening with earphones, as I see so many young people walking around with wires attached to their ears. But a whole industry has grown up, with all the big names like Bose, Altec Lansing, etc., supplying really gorgeous and high quality speaker systems that integrate with the iPod. The little iPods themselves are so cute and easy to use, little color screens and gigabytes of storage. Amazing stuff.

I intend to go back to the Apple store when things quite down during the week, taking more time to look at the features of these lovely-designed machines.

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When one walks into an Apple Store, it is almost perceptually self-evident that there is something special going on in there. I was most recently in one just yesterday at the Mall of America, as were about 50 other people at the time. My companion was the one with business to conduct, so I just looked around, not at the merchandise, but at the people. Men, women, young, old, technical, teenage girl who just wants an iPod, they were all there, and they all wanted to get into some Apple. That the company produces products for which such a variety of people *lust* is quite an accomplishment.

Disclaimer: I drank the kool aid about eight months ago.

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the iPod displays really astounded me. In my naivete I had assumed that iPods were just good for listening with earphones, as I see so many young people walking around with wires attached to their ears. But a whole industry has grown up, with all the big names like Bose, Altec Lansing, etc., supplying really gorgeous and high quality speaker systems that integrate with the iPod.  The little iPods themselves are so cute and easy to use, little color screens and gigabytes of storage. Amazing stuff.

iPods are one of the best things ever. I have a voice recorder for mine which I use to record lectures at school, and it can also be used as an external hard drive to transfer files back & forth between home & school.

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I just had to post, I haven't read the thread yet...

I love my Macintosh!!!!!!!!! :wacko:

And the Nyc store is way cool, too.

For mac conversions, 1st stop should be macosxhints.com

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ok dearest macophiles,

I have been hunting since my robots course, which I sniff sob had to drop, to understand better what conversions are around for dos/win on the mac.

I found some interesting info that could possibly have helped my lego robots success a lot; I will cc my lab partner;

first, a list of resources; http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/aoaug/mac_osx.html#dosbox

they pointed to a mac implementation of a dosbox; I'm really curious how well it works!

http://www.holwegner.com/software/#DOSBox

it's based on the linux project to port dos; x86 emulator, dosbox;

http://dosbox.sourceforge.net/news.php?show_news=1

games has become an area of interest; someone mentioned an old game that runs only on dos;

http://adeptsoftware.com/jetpack/

there seems to be a site devoted to old games;

http://www.reloaded.org/ it's called abandonia

so maybe Jetpack can run on a lovely mac :wacko:.

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Stephen

I ran across a blog posting on tuaw.com which speculates that Apple may indeed be intending to switch to intel in order to create a machine which can run both xp and os x on the same machine simultaneously.  Check out the full post here:

http://www.tuaw.com/2005/11/09/apple-gearing-up-for-os-war/

Makes sense to me. We've got Linux and Windows running simultaneously, so why not add OS X. In addition to the obvious advantages, it would also make a transition from Windows to Apple easier.

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Makes sense to me. We've got Linux and Windows running simultaneously, so why not add OS X. In addition to the obvious advantages, it would also make a transition  from Windows to Apple easier.

Stephen, there is also a software package called "Virtual PC" (click) which allows you to run Windows OSs on a MAC, not to mention Linux.

Here is an article, dated 2002, on it: -> Virtual PC Is Virtually Perfect

I've used the one for Windows. They have a free 45 day trial version available for download for Windows. I don't know about Macs. I installed Win2000 and win98, and it works pretty well. It wasn't super fast, as you might expect, but it was fast enough. I could install applications and run them just fine and switching from my WindowsXP to the Virtual PC was instantaneous. It just took a click of the mouse.

The Virtual PC is useful for legacy software (lots of people have old games that will only run on earlier OSs), for testing software across platforms, and for transitioning to a new OS. Those are some uses that come to my mind, at any rate! :)

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Thales

I dont know if you are suggesting that as a stop gap measure, but there is a performance hit when you use virtual pc - sometimes a quite substantial one. The point the article makes is that the type of system they are referencing would not have that performance hit because it doesn't do the same thing as something like virtual pc.

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I realize that, Brian. I was presenting a low cost alternative as a "stop gap" as you mention.

I have used it on WinXP, and while it is slower, it's not too bad.

Btw, I just noted that in the article you cited they do mention the Virtual PC. Oh well. :)

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I finally found the Mac word processor I've been looking for. I'm ever the stickler on word processors. It is called Mariner Write found here Mariner Software.

It is a fine program for only $49.95, and is not so gross as the free Appleworks that comes with the OS. Of course all you get is the word processor. Still cheaper than Word!

They have a forum for help and requests that is responsive and personable (something that I've missed since losing Atlantis Ocean Mind) in addition to the documentation.

I love supporting companies like this. Try it out. :)

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I've followed this thread with some interest, primarily because I have become a recent iPod lover, after having used other portable devices for years.

Since 1999, I've owned various MP3 players of different types and storage capabilities. I bought the first 32 MB Rio device when it first came out and thought it was a fun little gadget, but obviously didn't have enough storage. It was a start.

I later got an Archos 10 GB device and liked it well enough till it died an ugly death on me.

Later, I got a Creative Labs MuVo, which was (and still is) perfect for the gym or jogging. I later purchased a 20 GB Zen, which I still have, but don't use much anymore.

In about March of this year, when Apple released the Shuffle, I got one for its size and price. I've been delighted with it because it fills a need I had at the time - size, capacity and ease of use. I use it primarily when I jog. I find it motivates me to push myself. You know the routine - I tell myself I'll keep jogging until that 10-minute Loreena McKennitt song is over. :D

In August, I knew it was time for a larger iPod, having become a fan of iTunes. So I bit the bullet and got the 60 GB color model that I can also put photos on. I use it all over the place - at home, I plug it into the iHome clock radio that sits on my desk, around town when I'm driving, I use the FM transmitter to play it through my car stereo, when traveling, I use it on the plane. It's like a comforting piece of home wherever I am.

Just when I thought Apple was on the downward slide, they come up with a ubiquitous device and the market has responded with all the supporting accessories. I liken it to the VHS, which, while considered technically inferior to Sony's Betamax, ended up being the best product. The iPod is this generation's best of breed device.

That said, I don't think Apple would have made the strides it has in recent years without Windows. When iTunes became available for Windows, that's when the iPod really started taking off. I remember when the iPod first came out in 2001. It was hailed as a great device, but alas, it was not compatible with Windows. That doomed it to the niche the Apple has had for years. As soon as the iPod could connect to a Windows machine, things really heated up. Now you're hard pressed not to see iPods all over the place.

I am primarily a Windows user. This is due to my work. The software my company writes works on Windows (the server piece is actually written for Windows, UNIX and Linux) and my laptop is a Dell. I have rarely had problems with Windows XP and I hammer my work laptop pretty hard. It has traveled with me all over the world, I leave it on for weeks on end and it keeps going. So the claims the Windows machines are somehow lesser than Macs is rather maddening to me. My attitude is and always has been: the best tool for the job. Macs are fantastic machines - I'm considering getting myself a Mini just to have a "sandbox" to play in - but they're not always the best machines. Most businesses have used Windows machines for very good business reasons for many years.

I understand the fervor people have for their Macs, and that's perfectly fine with me, but there are very good reasons for using Windows and in my case, it would be a very bad idea to switch to a Mac for other than my personal computing tasks.

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