Alex

particle trajectory in double slit

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In Dr. Lewis Little's lecture he mentions that the elementary waves don't exert a force on the particles, or maybe I misunderstood what he was saying. If the particles are particles then a change in direction would require a force, where is this force coming from?

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In Dr. Lewis Little's lecture he mentions that the elementary waves don't exert a force on the particles, or maybe I misunderstood what he was saying.  If the particles are particles then a change in direction would require a force, where is this force coming from?

A change in direction can only occur as a consequence of a scattering event. The elementary waves already exist in any specific direction, and it is the particle interaction with another particle, an elastic scattering at the slit, which is the physical cause of the particle following the wave that had already interfered at the slit.

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Are the waves isolated in discrete directions? If so what in the scattering process forces the particle to follow one of these directions and not something else -- or if any direction is possible then what is the role of the wave in the selection to follow it so the diffraction pattern comes out right over time? In other words, what is the connection between a wave associated with an allowed direction and the force on a particle during scattering which causes it to go that way, resulting in the observed intensity pattern on the screen? (Does this have a simple answer at all or is the question misconstrued somehow?)

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Are the waves isolated in discrete directions?  If so what in the scattering process forces the particle to follow one of these directions and not something else -- or if any direction is possible then what is the role of the wave in the selection to follow it so the diffraction pattern comes out right over time?  In other words, what is the connection between a wave associated with an allowed direction and the force on a particle during scattering which causes it to go that way, resulting in the observed intensity pattern on the screen?  (Does this have a simple answer at all or is the question misconstrued somehow?)

Elementary waves of all characteristics exist in all directions, and coherent waves stimulate emission of particles at the source. The source is capable of emitting particles with only certain characteristics, and those particles contain an inner parameter allowing them to match with the elementary waves of the prescribed energy and momentum. The waves that the particles follow have already elastically scattered at the slit, having been "emitted" from the screen as a set of mutually coherent waves. (The waves are not actually emitted, since they already exist. The wave flux is simply rearranged in a coherent manner.) The particles following their waves, then, elastically scatter at the slit, following the coherent waves back to the screen.

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