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Who are your favorite painters, and why?

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More works by Waterhouse that I enjoy:

Lamia, 1909

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Psyche Entering Cupid's Garden, 1904

psyche_entering_cupids_garden_cgfa.jpg

Miranda - The Tempest, 1916

waterhouse_john_william_miranda_the_tempest.jpg

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I enjoy SF art a lot. My favorite artist in this genre is Michael Whelan. His web-site is here: http://www.glassonion.com/, but it appears to be down right now, otherwise I would have posted specific pictures.

I like Klimt a lot. I think he captures the joy of love and feminine sensuality better than anyone else, and his use of colors and golds is admirable.

I am not sure Rockwell would be considered a "fine artist", but both his techniques and his subjects are inspiring.

In sculpture, I like Rodin best.

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I enjoy SF art a lot.  My favorite artist in this genre is Michael Whelan.  His web-site is here: http://www.glassonion.com/, but it appears to be down right now, otherwise I would have posted specific pictures.

I am not sure Rockwell would be considered a "fine artist", but both his techniques and his subjects are inspiring.

I hadn't heard of Michael Whelan before and just looked him up. You're right - a nice use of color! The glassonion site didn't work for me either, so I grabbed this link to view his gallery: http://www.michaelwhelan.com/

Norman Rockwell is excellent too! His works are so American and exude something positive.

Patrick, I love the Psyche Entering Cupid's Garden painting as well!

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My favorite artist is Eyvind Earle. I wasn't much of an art lover until one day I passed a gallery that had something of his in their window. He mainly did landscapes and seascapes and these are my favorite themes. I really like the color in his very stark and stylistic works. Most of them have a 'California' flavor and he does capture California magnificently in my estimation. One of his pieces that I have is called 'Gothic Forest' which you can see if you click on serigraphs at www.gallery21.com. There are many of his works to see there. I don't know too much about him but I know that he worked on Disney's "Fantasia" back in the 30s(or was it 40s?).

I also like a lot of Leroy Neiman's work. Again, I like his use of color and to my mind the color adds action to his subjects, be it an athlete or a sophisticated bar scene.

I am lucky enough to live close to the Quent Cordair art gallery in Burlingame California and have enjoyed dropping in there several times. If you ever get the chance to visit Northern California, Cordair should be on your agenda.

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My favorite artist is Eyvind Earle.  I wasn't much of an art lover until one day I passed a gallery that had something of his in their window.  He mainly did landscapes and seascapes and these are my favorite themes.  I really like the color in his very stark and stylistic works.  Most of them have a 'California' flavor and he does capture California magnificently in my estimation.  One of his pieces that I have is called 'Gothic Forest' which you can see if you click on serigraphs at www.gallery21.com.  There are many of his works to see there.  I don't know too much about him but I know that he worked on Disney's "Fantasia" back in the 30s(or was it 40s?). 

I love Eyvind Earle too although I think of him as a great graphic artist rather than a painter. I first became aware of his work from his Christmas cards. His designs were the most beautiful and dramatic of all in the catalogs of custom cards.

If you like Earle, you might also enjoy the work of another Disney "backgrounder" turned fine artist, Peter Ellenshaw (click here and here), whose paintings were displayed in the Hammer Galleries in New York City alongside Ayn Rand favorite Jose Manuel Capuletti. Then there's Ellenshaw's son Harrison Ellenshaw who did the matte painting backgrounds for Star Wars and other films and paintings like these (click here). And Here's Harrison Ellenshaw's New York cityscape titled "Gotham Night."

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I feel as if it may be almost a bromide of sorts to even mention him and his piece...

Raphael. Specifically for The School of Athens. I can't, at times, keep my eyes off it (it is on my wall). Not only is it a beautiful work of art from a master, but what a condensation and concretization of Western philosophy and history.

Has anybody ever just sat back and thought of what is in that scene?

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I feel as if it may be almost a bromide of sorts to even mention him and his piece...

Raphael. Specifically for The School of Athens. I can't, at times, keep my eyes off it (it is on my wall).

It's on my wall, as well. It's a great piece!

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My favorite artist featured at the Cordair Gallery is Damon Denys.

His An Awakening Mind is just incredible.

I'm also a huge fan of Denys. I've always had a big response to music and literature, but visual arts have tended to leave me hanging. All of that changed when I first viewed Denys' work.

"Weight of the World: Atlas in a New Age" brought tears to my eyes. Some other favorites are "Gold Standard" and "An Awakening Mind," which you listed.

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I wholeheartedly agree! Dali's style is exactly what I am looking for in art...If only he had subject matter that wasn't so darn freaky.  :excl:

I said almost the exact same thing to a friend of mine just a couple of days ago.

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As my wife's Christmas present I recently acquired an nice print of Tamara De Lempicka's Dormeuse. I'm not sure what I think of the rest of her works (some which you can see here) but I love this one.javascript:emoticon(':)')

smilie

Dormeuse_1931_-_32.jpg

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Which painters of fine art, past or present, are your favorites?

My favorite so far is John William Waterhouse. I enjoy his style as well as the beautiful and romantic subjects of his paintings.

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I like this too. A refreshing view of life.

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I wholeheartedly agree! Dali's style is exactly what I am looking for in art. As much as many romantic artists are good, I can't abide their "fuzzy" styles.

If only he had subject matter that wasn't so darn freaky.  :)

Watch it; or you will have "subjectivist" stapled to your brow. :)

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Hello! I just recently found this forum, and was excited to see a discussion of favorite paintings.

My favorite artist is Tamara de Lempicka.  Her use of color is powerful but not overwhelming.  My favorite painting by her is the Girl With Gloves.

I like Tamara de Lempicka too--especially because she is a rather mysterious anomaly in modern art history. She just seemed to appear out of nowhere with a very bold, original style. Art historians don't seem to be able to link her to other artists in a neat and tidy way, so they end up ignoring her.

I also love Caspar David Friedrich, and I had no idea he had been mentioned in a lecture by Mary Ann Sures--that is very interesting! My favorite by him is "Large Enclosure Near Dresden" I love love love this painting. The space seems to reach out and draw you in, as though you were flying into the painting.

A wonderful and often overlooked Renaissance artist is Giovanni Bellini. I love the clear, delicate light in his paintings. The National Gallery in Washington has a beautiful masterpiece by him, "The Feast of the Gods".

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I like Delacroix. Liberty Leading the People in particular. I like almost all paintings that fall under the category of neo-classicism and romanticism.

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I feel as if it may be almost a bromide of sorts to even mention him and his piece...

Raphael. Specifically for The School of Athens. I can't, at times, keep my eyes off it (it is on my wall). Not only is it a beautiful work of art from a master, but what a condensation and concretization of Western philosophy and history.

Has anybody ever just sat back and thought of what is in that scene?

I have, lots of times! It's on my wall too, an amazing piece of art. It's different in that it doesn't emotionally blow you away immediately, like most good paintings do, because there's all these people and it's a little crowded; the beauty of the painting arises from contemplating its various figures and aspects, over a length of time.

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I have, lots of times! It's on my wall too, an amazing piece of art. It's different in that it doesn't emotionally blow you away immediately, like most good paintings do, because there's all these people and it's a little crowded; the beauty of the painting arises from contemplating its various figures and aspects, over a length of time.

There are some beautiful drawing studies that Raphael did for figures in this painting. One of the things I really like about Raphael is how clearly his drawing skills show in his paintings. The basic linear idea is there and clearly visible, even if it has been "fleshed out" exquisitely in paint.

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There are so many painters whose work I love, but one who all too frequently is unjustly bashed, is Salvador Dali.

That reminds me of a funny story. At age 10 my parents took me on a trip through Florida. One morning my mother kept insisting "We have to stop at the dolly museum! The dolly museum!!" I whined and muttered and dragged my feet because I didn't want to go see a bunch of silly dolls and couldn't understand why on earth she was so interested and adamant about it.

Of course, it turns out she was saying the "Dali Museum" and it was a magnificent gallery! I spent hours walking around looking at the paintings and reading the very descriptive painting notes near each one. At the end of the gallery it had some two-story tall paintings that were awe-inspiring. In particular I loved the "Ecumenical Council" and the "Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus". I was thrilled when my parents bought me prints of them as souvenirs.

Since I'm already reminiscing...later as a teenager I hunted down his (somewhat crazy) autobiography and with the new context found his work even more fascinating. After I graduated high school, on a trip to Paris (when the rest of the tour group was busy climbing the Eiffel Tower) my mother and I spent a wonderful afternoon poking around street corners finding an obscure and special Dali exhibit of works we'd never seen.

Now that I think of it - I may have been the only pre-teenage girl in the early 1990s with Salvador Dali prints adorning my walls instead of "New Kids On The Block" posters!

And I am so glad I had parents who encouraged my interest in art and music!!

:)

Molly

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That's a lot of good art! Thanks to those who have posted.

I would like to mention Steve Hanks. He paints watercolors of women, for the most part - beautiful women in various states of repose, reflection, and undress.

See some here:

Hanks

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That reminds me of a funny story. At age 10 my parents took me on a trip through Florida. One morning my mother kept insisting "We have to stop at the dolly museum! The dolly museum!!" I whined and muttered and dragged my feet because I didn't want to go see a bunch of silly dolls and couldn't understand why on earth she was so interested and adamant about it.

Of course, it turns out she was saying the "Dali Museum" and it was a magnificent gallery!

That is a funny story. I'm glad that you had a chance to visit that museum. I have enjoyed viewing pictures of the two paintings that you singled out, but I would really love to see the originals. Dali's painting style just amazes me.

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I enjoy the works of Bill Brauer (see his work here).

I love his use of color, and the beautiful and sexy way he depicts dancing. My personal favorite is "Tango Dancers." He seems to be quite commercially successful - I have seen his prints for sale at stores such as Target and Bed, Bath & Beyond.

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....

I would like to mention Steve Hanks.  He paints watercolors of women, for the most part - beautiful women in various states of repose, reflection, and undress.

See some here:

Hanks

I really like the work of Steve Hanks; I have quite a few prints of his paintings hanging in my house.

I first discovered his work about 15 years ago in a print store in a local shopping mall. Hanks's work stood out from all the rest; it was so stunningly beautiful that it didn't look like it belonged in the same store. After I'd returned a few times, each time buying a framed Steve Hanks print, one of the staff members told me that in fact his work sells very well.

There's a good book containing many pictures of his paintings: The Art of Steve Hanks - Poised Between Heartbeats, as well as a short biography, and comments by Hanks about his work. The subtitle is a reference to the fact that he is very good at depicting emotions in his work. And, this leads to the fact that many of his paintings are of women. In his words:

People often ask me why I paint so many women.  The answer is that these are not simply paintings of women.  They are paintings of emotions.  Men are taught to not show their feelings, to project a certain preconceived idea of masculinity.  Women express a far more subtle range of intimacy and vulnerability.

One of my favorites (of many to choose from!) is titled Best Friends. It's of two young women leisurely sitting in a large patio, resting, such that one is leaning on the back of the other - in a way that does the title justice. If somebody asked me what it meant to be "best friends", all I'd have to do is point at this painting.

(His ability extends beyond the painting of people, however: I'm looking right now at a painting of his, of a girl in a chair, petting a cat. And I always feel like I can practically hear that cat purring away contently, every time I look at it.)

He is an artist who, faced with an explicit choice earlier in his life, made the decision to depict the beauty of the human figure:

I made an absolute, solid commitment to step away from caricature art, from sketching out the human form into a kind of ugly reality.  I moved, slowly perhaps, from a disrespect of the human figure toward attempt to celebrate it.

And his attempts succeed very well.

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My favorite painter is Vermeer. Internet pictures that I can find don't seem to do him justice.. Here is a Salvador Dali picture whose subject is Vermeer, sort of..

The Ghost of Vermeer of Delft Which Can Be Used As A Table.

(here's another link if that didn't work..)

But after I look at Vermeer's paintings, everything else seems to look so much clearer.

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I really enjoy the paintings of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema. In particular, I love his contrast of the blue sky and sea with the white marble that is so common in his works.

My favorite is "A Reading from Homer" see here

And "Xanthe and Phaon" see here

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Sarah, thanks for those paintings! I've really enjoyed them in the past, but have forgotten about them, and now seeing them because of you brings the awesome memories back! I agree, those paintings are incredible.

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Well, I guess I am a bit of a purist -- or what many call a curmodgeon. And sorry for posting so late on this topic!

I frankly much prefer photography to almost any painting. Painting is way too interpretive, and always gets reality wrong. Those who justify it tend to fall back upon emotions and meanings that frankly I dont really understand -- and find it hard that any true objectivist would understand. And so much art is either directly or indirectly inspired by and used to support religion. Then we get to the stuff that the art glitterati rave about, starting with impressionists (an absolutely fitting term to describe their immoral approach), to surrealists (playing with subjective perceptions, subconscious, and other pyscho mumbo jumpo), to pop art (if ever there was a fitting phrase.....), to abstract art, which I am happy to see many people find to be as ridiculous as I.

Sorry, I dont mean to offend anyone on this list -- though I am sure that I have (so apologies!). But I really dont see how any painting can be useful or enjoyed -- it is such a clear distortion of reality and the truth.

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