Stephen Speicher

Band of Brothers (2001)

Rate this TV show   7 votes

  1. 1. Rate this TV show

    • 10
      3
    • 9
      2
    • 8
      1
    • 7
      1
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

6 posts in this topic

This is a 10 part series of 1 hour episodes that details the true story of the legendary Easy Company of the 101st airborne division during the D-Day invasion of WWII and follows them to the end of the war.

I bring this up on this forum because I wanted to let anyone who hasn't seen it know that this series has one of the best examples of heroism that I've ever seen on television. And I've seen a lot of television.

Damian Lewis plays Richard Winters, and the series rightly focuses on his character's emergence as a leader who deals with a brutal situation with steely-eyed focus, and without ever losing his humanity. This kind of hero is a rational decision-maker, who makes the best of an often impossible world, but always takes on the responsibility of fighting for a just cause.

The show has such a reverence for the real-life man that the character is never undercut by the typical devices that modern writers use to "humanize" heroes, like self-directed humor, or character flaws intended to make the audience identify with the hero but are irrelevent distractions at best (and nihilism at worst).

It is a brutal show, so it's not for the squeamish. Although, I'd argue that the intensity of the show (characters you've spent enough time with to care for are placed in horrific situations) makes you think you're seeing more violence than you actually are.

But if you want to see a character than you can feel heroic admiration for, without reservation, you won't find very many examples finer than this in television.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I bring this up on this forum because I wanted to let anyone who hasn't seen it know that this series has one of the best examples of heroism that I've ever seen on television.... The show has such a reverence for the real-life man that the character is never undercut by the typical devices that modern writers use to "humanize" heroes ... But if you want to see a character than you can feel heroic admiration for, without reservation, you won't find very many examples finer than this in television.

Wow. That is quite a recommendation, Joel. Thanks.

Now, if I can only figure out where to find that 10 hours ... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now, if I can only figure out where to find that 10 hours ...  :)

The DVD set can be found here

. Now, as for those ten hours, I'll paraphrase the potato commercial: "You can't watch just one episode!"

The series originally aired on HBO. It was rebroadcast on the History Channel recently and may resurface there again. With top notch production values, believable characters and great writing this series is the most riveting I've seen in a long time. All without the message of sacrifice found in Saving Private Ryan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also recommend the series.

The acting is fantastic. The action is amazing.

spoiler follows . . .

The scene (in episode 6 or 7? not sure which) where Lt. Spears runs through the German occupied town - TWICE - was one of the most thrilling depictions of courage and heroism I've seen in a long time. It was superbly filmed. I sat there thinking to myself as he ran: "Please let him make it. Please let him make it." That's exactly the sort of scene wherein the makers of many films would take pleasure in having the hero gunned down so as to revel in his "sacrifice". And the fact that it is, apparently, based on actual events makes it that much more thrilling and gratifying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow. That is quite a recommendation, Joel. Thanks.

Now, if I can only figure out where to find that 10 hours ...  :)

My suggestion would be to rent or Netflix the first disc, and then you'll be hooked. It's like ballroom dance lessons. Or heroin, for that matter.

By the way, it's interesting that we don't get this kind of heroism in pure fiction. Only in drama "based on real-events."

Or in fantasy so distant from reality as to be unrecognizable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites