Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Stephen Speicher

Tombstone (1993)

Rate this movie   14 votes

  1. 1. Rate this movie

    • 10
      6
    • 9
      3
    • 8
      2
    • 7
      3
    • 6
      0
    • 5
      0
    • 4
      0
    • 3
      0
    • 2
      0
    • 1
      0
    • 0
      0

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

23 posts in this topic

I was about to be putting this movie up for review in the next month but Rose was the quicker draw.

Of all the movies I love there are three that hold an unshakable, supreme place far above them all: Gladiator, Braveheart, and Tombstone.

There are so many amazing elements to Tombstone that make it a great film: the heroes are some of the most powerful and eccentric of any you'll ever see (Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday), the villains are some of the most disgusting and vile (Johnny Ringo and the Cowboys); the acting is thoroughly superb, just about every actor in this film did their all-time best work here; there is an excellent romance; and there is, of course, a ton of gritty-heroic "shoot-em-up" scenes throughout the film. Top all that off with a profoundly benevolent and satisfying ending, and you have one great film :)

Not to mention, if you watch it, you can learn all the great one-liners of Val Kilmer's character, Doc Holliday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In an interview in 1896, Wyatt Earp had this to say about Doc Holliday: "Doc was a dentist whom necessity had made a gambler; a gentleman whom disease had made a frontier vagabond; a philosopher whom life had made a caustic wit; a long lean ash-blond fellow nearly dead with consumption, and at the same time the most skillful gambler and the nerviest, speediest, deadliest man with a gun that I ever knew."

The movie worth watching alone just for Val Kilmer's character, Doc Holliday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The movie worth watching alone just for Val Kilmer's character, Doc Holliday.

"That's the rumor."

:)

I totally concur. My roommate once said that Tombstone is the only movie he could watch all day and not get tired of.

The dynamic between Johnny Ringo and Doc Holiday is absolutely wonderful. Ringo and Doc are both very intelligent, but Ringo chooses the path of evil. Ringo is one of the best foils ever written for the screen. There is a scene where the story of Faust is being acted out on stage. Curly Bill, the leader of the Cowboys, asks Ringo what he would do if the Devil aproached him with his deal. Ringo responds "I already did it." Its almost as if at one point he was good, and something traumatic happened in his life to make him grow disheartened with the world.

I highly recommend this movie to anyone looking for a great story, superb acting, and the smiting of evil-doers by the hand of JUSTICE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"That's the rumor."

:)

I totally concur.  My roommate once said that Tombstone is the only movie he could watch all day and not get tired of. 

The dynamic between Johnny Ringo and Doc Holiday is absolutely wonderful.  Ringo and Doc are both very intelligent, but Ringo chooses the path of evil.  Ringo is one of the best foils ever written for the screen.  There is a scene where the story of Faust is being acted out on stage.  Curly Bill, the leader of the Cowboys, asks Ringo what he would do if the Devil aproached him with his deal.  Ringo responds "I already did it."  Its almost as if at one point he was good, and something traumatic happened in his life to make him grow disheartened with the world.

I highly recommend this movie to anyone looking for a great story, superb acting, and the smiting of evil-doers by the hand of JUSTICE.

:) That's the rumor indeed. If you do watch this movie you have to pay attention because there is a gold-mine of subtle, witty dialogue to be discovered around Doc's character.

Justice is especially done when by the hands of Kurt Russell holding a double-barrel 12-gauge screaming "You tell 'em I'm coming--and hell's coming with me!" (Don't think Kurt Russell from cheesy 80's movies, it is a side you have never seen of him before and never will again.

I guess I particularly like the film just because I love the American Southwest: I just think that region, culture, and state of mind carries a lot of the "self-reliant, rugged individualist" over from back in the days of the "Old West" that epitomized it (as long as you stay away from government-hand out feed-trough indian reservations :))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I'll be your Huckleberry" Doc Holliday

I also agree that the movie has a great amount of one liners. When I was in the Marine Corps we would always start a maneuver/patrol by warning the enemy that we were bringing hell with us!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of all the movies I love there are three that hold an unshakable, supreme place far above them all:  Gladiator, Braveheart, and Tombstone.

hi Carlos! I love Braveheart. I don't think I've seen Gladiator, how are they alike? If that's ok to post here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
we would always start a maneuver/patrol by warning the enemy that we were bringing hell with us!

That is so great. It's so profound too, the proper attitude and sanction you need to feel to fight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess I particularly like the film just because I love the American Southwest: I just think that region, culture, and state of mind carries a lot of the "self-reliant, rugged individualist" over from back in the days of the "Old West" that epitomized it...

I agree with you here Jordan. There are many John Wayne movies that leave me with the exact description. An example in the movie Hondo is where John Wayne is talking to the female lead and she states "that everybody needs somebody." John Wayne replies, "Yep, most do and its a terrible thing."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
An example in the movie Hondo is where John Wayne is talking to the female lead and she states "that everybody needs somebody."  John Wayne replies, "Yep, most do and its a terrible thing."

I quoted this incorrectly, here is the correct wording.

Geraldine Page: Well everyone needs someone.

John Wayne: Yes mam, most everyone, to bad isn't it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I particularly like the film just because I love the American Southwest: I just think that region, culture, and state of mind carries a lot of the "self-reliant, rugged individualist" over from back in the days of the "Old West" that epitomized it (as long as you stay away from government-hand out feed-trough indian reservations :D)

Since you like that sort of Western ethos, as do I, I'd recommend the Westerns of Frank Spearman. His railroad fiction is well known among Objectivists, but his Westerns are less well known---but just as good. All of them feature rugged individualists as ranchers, miners, businessmen, lawmen. A non-chalant sort of fearlessness is one of their common traits. They are all sticklers for justice, and men of absolute integrity, like Spearman's most famous creation, Whispering Smith. I love the heroes of his Westerns.

Here are their titles:

Nan of Music Mountain available from Paper Tiger

Laramie Holds the Range also available from Paper Tiger

Selwood of Sleepy Cat (one of my favorites, especially the hilarious chapter titled The Queen of Sheba Stockings)

Flambeau Jim

Hell's Desert

Gunlock Ranch

Other than the two available from Paper Tiger, you'll have to find them from one of the internet used book sites.

They all take place in the same setting as Spearman's railroad fiction: Sleepy Cat and Medicine Bend (based on the actual Union Pacific station town of Medicine Bow, Wyoming).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But speaking of Tombstone, I saw it once a long while ago. The one thing that stuck with me was that line of Doc's, "I'm your huckleberry." If I remember the scene correctly, one of the bad guys was out looking for someone to kill, presumably one of the Earp's, when Doc appeared out of nowhere with that line: "I'm your huckleberry." Loved that.

The movie also had Sam Eliot in it, as Virgil Earp. Eliot is my favorite Western actor. He is exactly who I picture in my mind when I'm reading Spearman's Westerns---he fits that character type to a T. Soft spoken, unassuming, and fearless. And handy with a gun. Too bad none of Spearman's Westerns were ever made into movies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my favorite scene in the whole movie. Doc is lying in bed, and Wyatt asks him:

Wyatt Earp: What makes a man like Ringo, Doc? What makes him do the things he does?

Doc Holliday: A man like Ringo has got a great big hole, right in the middle of himself. And he can never kill enough, or steal enough, or inflict enough pain to ever fill it.

Wyatt Earp: What does he want?

Doc Holliday: Revenge.

Wyatt Earp: For what?

Doc Holliday: Bein' born.

Evil men depend on others for their survival. And, the actor who plays Johnny Ringo plays the role of a man who despises reality so well. Just another reason why this movie is in my top ten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The movie also had Sam Eliot in it, as Virgil Earp.  Eliot is my favorite Western actor.  He is exactly who I picture in my mind when I'm reading Spearman's Westerns---he fits that character type to a T.  Soft spoken, unassuming, and fearless.  And handy with a gun.  Too bad none of Spearman's Westerns were ever made into movies.

I also enjoy Sam Eliot, and think he is a very good Western actor.

Ironically I met him at a local grocery store in Malibu. I was on my way to Santa Barbara and stopped to get a snack at a country grocery store on the PCH. As my brother and I were walking through the store we almost bumped into him. I then told my brother who I thought that was. He actually parked right next to us and as he came out we told him how much we enjoyed his acting. He was very pleasant and said thank you while hoping that we enjoyed our time in Santa Barbara.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is my favorite scene in the whole movie.  Doc is lying in bed, and Wyatt asks him:

Wyatt Earp: What makes a man like Ringo, Doc? What makes him do the things he does?

Doc Holliday: A man like Ringo has got a great big hole, right in the middle of himself. And he can never kill enough, or steal enough, or inflict enough pain to ever fill it.

Wyatt Earp: What does he want?

Doc Holliday: Revenge.

Wyatt Earp: For what?

Doc Holliday: Bein' born.

Evil men depend on others for their survival.  And, the actor who plays Johnny Ringo plays the role of a man who despises reality so well.  Just another reason why this movie is in my top ten.

That was a part of the movie that never really made sense when I was younger, but now is much clearer to me after reading Atlas Shrugged and studying philosophy; I understand it not in the exact sense you stated but close enough in meaning.

And you should be quite pleased Ray to have met Virgil; if you've seen "The Big Lebowski" you should have asked him to say "the dude abides...".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hi Carlos!  I love Braveheart.  I don't think I've seen Gladiator, how are they alike?  If that's ok to post here.

If you love Braveheart you should definitely love Gladiator, though not necessarily for the same reasons.

I love Braveheart for the poetic struggle against oppression, and how the movie states that freedom is always worth fighting for, no matter what the cost.

Gladiator on the other hand I love because of the Stoic morality the film presents as good; and how it shows, by definition, that evil (Commodus) is always the weak and cowardly, while good (Maximus) is always strong and brave.

There is also a thread on this forum over Gladiator:

http://forums.4aynrandfans.com/index.php?showtopic=2036

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...Too bad none of Spearman's Westerns were ever made into movies.

Whispering Smith was made into a movie, in 1948. (Perhaps by "Westerns", you weren't meaning to include this one, since it's one of his RR stories.) I haven't ever seen it though. A quick check on Amazon.com shows that it's available these days. (The description of the plot that they give sounds like the Spearman book, so I'm sure that's the book this movie is based on.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whispering Smith was made into a movie, in 1948.  (Perhaps by "Westerns", you weren't meaning to include this one, since it's one of his RR stories.)  I haven't ever seen it though.  A quick check on Amazon.com shows that it's available these days.  (The description of the plot that they give sounds like the Spearman book, so I'm sure that's the book this movie is based on.)

Oh yes, I have the Whispering Smith DVD. It's excellent. It is really a mixture of railroad fiction and Western, leaning toward Western. Whispering Smith is played by Alan Ladd, and his antagonist is played by Robert Preston.

I should have noted that exception to the rule. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched it last night. It was awesome! I love Doc Holiday, especially contrasting his interactions with Wyatt Earp and Johnny Ringo.

I would consider this a Spoiler

One of my favorite lines of the movie (happens right after the river scene with Wyatt Earp standing straight up and charging all the Cowboys by himself) was when someone asks Doc Holiday why he was doing all this, he says:

"Wyatt Earp is my friend."

"Hell, I've got lots of friends"

"I don't."

I don't think I need to say anything more.

Zak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Wyatt Earp is my friend."

"Hell, I've got lots of friends"

"I don't."

"Where's Wyatt?"

"He's down by the river...walkin' on water."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Where's Wyatt?"

"He's down by the river...walkin' on water."

I love that line! Another good exchange:

Doc: [with one gun drawn, in his left hand, pointing at Billy Clanton, and a metal cup of liquor in his right] And you -- music lover -- you're next.

Billy: Hmmph... the drunk piano-player. You're so drunk, you can't hit nothin'. In fact [drawing his knife] you're probably seeing double.

Doc: [draining the cup and drawing his other gun] I've got two guns. One for each of ya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are two old Westerns, worth a look for Tombstone fans, from which the writer and/or director of Tombstone clearly took various ideas and scenes. IMDb links below. Both are available from Netflix as rentals (w/ membership) or for purchase from Amazon.

Dodge City (1939) w/ Errol Flynn & Olivia de Havilland

and

Forty Guns (1957) w/ Barbara Stanwyck & Barry Sullivan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0