Stephen Speicher

The Incredibles

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14 posts in this topic

"The Incredibles"  won this year's Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film.

Way to go!

Also, at an earlier animation awards ceremony whose name escapes me, Brad Bird won for "best vocal performance (or whatever they called it) for the voice of Edna (who is my favorite character in that movie :o).

Brad Bird also wrote and directed The Incredibles. Interesting story about the voice of Edna: they tried a number of actors for the part, and every one of them kept coming back to Bird, asking him to do the voice as he thought of it so they could try to get it right. No one could quite get it, so, because everyone just kept trying to imitate him, Bird decided to do it himself.

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Also, at an earlier animation awards ceremony whose name escapes me, Brad Bird won for "best vocal performance (or whatever they called it) for the voice of Edna (who is my favorite character in that movie :)).

Brad Bird also wrote and directed The Incredibles. Interesting story about the voice of Edna: they tried a number of actors for the part, and every one of them kept coming back to Bird, asking him to do the voice as he thought of it so they could try to get it right. No one could quite get it, so, because everyone just kept trying to imitate him, Bird decided to do it himself.

Almost a year ago some of the senior scientists from Pixar came to Caltech to make a presentation to the applied mathematicians. (It's good business -- they figure if they can excite them enough, they will entice the best for their company.) The entire presentation was truly incredible (pardon the pun), but most relevant here was a segment from the original pitch made for Finding Nemo. These guys are so creative; the originator acted out the various roles and storylines which such enthusiasm and intensity that it was impossible to walk away from such a presentation and not want to make a film of it. I have tremendous admiration for the entire Pixar group.

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When this movie came out, there was quite a bit of discussion about whether the public references to Ayn Rand that reviewers made were justified. Well, while browsing the Objectivism Research CD-ROM for "theme" I happened across this item about her short story "The Little Street," as discussed in The Journals of Ayn Rand, p.20:

"Its theme is that humanity -- warped by a corrupt philosophy -- was destroying the best in man for the sake of enshrining morality."

That sounds to me a lot like the theme of this movie.

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"enshrining morality"

I think you meant "enshrining mediocrity".

D'Oh!

Thank you for the correction...

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Well, while browsing the Objectivism Research CD-ROM for "theme" I happened across this item about her short story "The Little Street," as discussed in The Journals of Ayn Rand, p.20:

...

My understanding is that "The Little Street" was not a short story, but rather a a novel that Ayn Rand planned to write, but never did.

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Here's an interesting quote from the creator of The Incredibles, Brad Bird:

THE HOT SEAT BRAD BIRD

By LOU LUMENICK

March 13, 2005

[...]

A:The idea that "The Incredibles," a mainstream animated feature, was thought of as provocative was wonderful to me. I was very gratified, though I thought some of the analysis was really kind of goofy.

Q:Such as?

A:Some pieces compared the viewpoint to the objectivist philosopher Ayn Rand. I thought that was silly and the writers were humorless. I was into Rand for about six months when I was 20, but you outgrow that narrow point of view. Some compromise is necessary in life.

You can read the entire New York Post interview on their web site for a short time. (click here)

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Well, while browsing the Objectivism Research CD-ROM for "theme" I happened across this item about her short story "The Little Street," as discussed in The Journals of Ayn Rand, p.20:

...

My understanding is that "The Little Street" was not a short story, but rather a a novel that Ayn Rand planned to write, but never did.

Leonard Peikoff has also referred to it as a "novelette," so maybe you two can split the difference. :)

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Here's an interesting quote from the creator of The Incredibles, Brad Bird:

You can read the entire New York Post interview on their web site for a short time.  (click here)

So tragic. Just six months? Hardly enough time to fully understand the concept "compromise" in Objectivism. His description of Objectivism as a "narrow point of view" and the short time he gave it thought are just indicative of something I have yet to fully understand. What allows people to do such a thing? Did Bird just misunderstand the philosophy? Did he evade? :)

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So tragic.  Just six months?  Hardly enough time to fully understand the concept "compromise" in Objectivism.  His description of Objectivism as a "narrow point of view" and the short time he gave it thought are just indicative of something I have yet to fully understand.  What allows people to do such a thing?  Did Bird just misunderstand the philosophy?  Did he evade?  :)

It takes all kinds. Here's an equally tragic story from my own life:

My Dad introduced me to Ayn Rand's fiction. He loved The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. He permanently kept the quote "Who is John Galt?" written on his white board at work. Two years later, after I returned from my first Objectivist conference, he gave me a copy of Herman Hesse's 'Steppenwolf' and told me it was also one of the most important books that shaped his view of the world.

I learned that some people's minds are very bizzare and just admiring Ayn Rand doesn't tell you as much about them as you would expect or hope. I'm don't believe this incident has made me overly discouraged or disillusioned about people, just cautiously skeptical about first impressions.

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So tragic.  Just six months?  Hardly enough time to fully understand the concept "compromise" in Objectivism.  His description of Objectivism as a "narrow point of view" and the short time he gave it thought are just indicative of something I have yet to fully understand.  What allows people to do such a thing?  Did Bird just misunderstand the philosophy?  Did he evade?  :)

I think it is most likely that Ayn Rand touched something, perhaps the best within him, but that he had other, conflicting ideas and values that may have kept him from exploring Objectivism deeply enough to be able to understand it and apply it consistently to his own life.

Most people have mixed premises, some of which are very good, and as a result they respond positively -- but not consistently -- to rational values. That was the theme of Ayn Rand's play, Ideal."

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I watched the film for the first time last night and loved it! I'm sure I'll watch it again this weekend!

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