erandror

Antitrust

12 posts in this topic

Hello everyone!

I am interested in learning everything I can about antitrust. I want more than the theory, laws, and history (which I can find in books, and have).

I want inside information about the actual process, the actual people, the dirty secrets behind the scenes, the unseen tragedies that go unnoticed by today's media.

This is all for a comprehensive piece I am writing on the subject. (A very good cause).

If anyone here thinks he can help, or knows someone who might be able to help, please let me know.

I'm particularly interested in hearing from antitrust defense lawyers, though I would definitely not want to erect any "barriers to entry". :D If you have any stories you want to share with everyone, you are most welcome to post them here as replies.

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An attorney named Bob Wierenga came to my Sports Law class last semester to lecture on antitrust. He represented the defendant NCAA in the NCAA/NIT antitrust litigation. He came across as a pleasant, upbeat man, so even if he's unwilling to help you himself he might be kind enough to refer you to some other resources. I'm sure you'd rather talk to somebody who's not a complete stranger, but if you get stuck, he's a complete stranger to try.

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Eran,

I do not know what you have read, but "The Abolition of Antitrust" is a great place to start. If you have read this book then you should already know that there is almost no one but Objectivist that are against the fundamentals of antitrust. Almost anyone that you meet or talk to we be a compromiser on some level.

I would think that if you really wanted to talk with someone, that Dr. Gary Hull would be a great place to start. I also think as the editor for the above mentioned book he would have the insight for the questions that you have.

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Thanks Groovestein!

And thanks, RayK - I did read The Abolition of Antitrust, among others, and even contacted one of the authors. None of the writers seemed to have that personal connection that I'm looking for, though.

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None of the writers seemed to have that personal connection that I'm looking for, though.

Eran,

I think you have a tough road ahead if you are looking for someone with a personal connection to "the actual process, the actual people, the dirty secrets behind the scenes, the unseen tragedies that go unnoticed by today's media."

In my business I have a few of these above mentioned people as clients. Most of them do not even see the antitrust laws as bad. They make statements like "they are there just to protect us". Or, they only think of them as part of business as something to overcome, nothing abnormal.

One person you might try to talk with, if he will talk is the President of BB&T. From what I have read about him, he is highly informed, and uses Objectivist principles within the company.

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Eran,

Could you be a little more specific about the kind of person you are looking for? For example:

- Business owners or managers whose companies were threatened with prosecution or actually prosecuted?

- Defense attorneys in this field(as you mentioned).

- Prosecuting attorneys for federal or state anti-trust offices?

- Attorneys or other employees of federal or state anti-trust offices, that is, individuals who were not prosecutors themselves but were witnesses to the mechanics -- or machinations -- of those offices.

- Politicians, or their employees, who wrestled with, perhaps even opposed, efforts to extend anti-trust legislation?

I have no personal contacts with any individuals listed above, but I would be surprised if you could not find published interviews with such individuals, at some point in the last 100 years or so.

If you can't find such published interviews, then I recommend following advice I heard from manufacturing clients stuck with an ugly design on a particular product: If can't fix it, feature it!

In other words, if all you find is silence, then you might introduce this as possible evidence of either a chill factor or widespread guilt and acquiescence.

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Could you be a little more specific about the kind of person you are looking for? For example:

- Business owners or managers whose companies were threatened with prosecution or actually prosecuted?

- Defense attorneys in this field(as you mentioned).

- Prosecuting attorneys for federal or state anti-trust offices?

- Attorneys or other employees of federal or state anti-trust offices, that is, individuals who were not prosecutors themselves but were witnesses to the mechanics -- or machinations -- of those offices.

- Politicians, or their employees, who wrestled with, perhaps even opposed, efforts to extend anti-trust legislation?

I'm looking for antitrust defense attorneys, primarily. Or anyone with intimate knowledge of how antitrust litigation really works today. This is for a fictional work.

If you can't find such published interviews, then I recommend following advice I heard from manufacturing clients stuck with an ugly design on a particular product: If can't fix it, feature it! In other words, if all you find is silence, then you might introduce this as possible evidence of either a chill factor or widespread guilt and acquiescence.

Thank you, that is a very good suggestion. Unfortunately I absolutely 100% require my own interview, as my angle is very unique. :D

There is absolutely no risk of exposure involved, however, as I am only pursuing this interview as a first phase and for my own understanding. No part of it will be quoted.

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One person you might try to talk with, if he will talk is the President of BB&T.  From what I have read about him, he is highly informed, and uses Objectivist principles within the company.

Yes, I'm definitely trying to focus on Objectivists with some intimate knowledge of antitrust at this stage. If I can't find any, I'll have a harder time with the average antitrust lawyer.

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Yes, I'm definitely trying to focus on Objectivists with some intimate knowledge of antitrust at this stage. If I can't find any, I'll have a harder time with the average antitrust lawyer.

I don't know anything about Mr. Wierenga's philosophy. If you're looking to target Objectivist antitrust lawyers (all four of them :D ), you should consider trying to find them through Objectivist lawyers like Adam Mossoff or Thomas Bowden. They might know an Objectivist antitrust specialist who can help you.

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If you want dramatically chilling examples of the injustices of antitrust, check out The following articles and speeches by Ayn Rand:

Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, Chapter 3, "America's Persecuted Minority: Big Business"

Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, Chapter 15, "Is Atlas Shrugging?"

The Voice of Reason, Chapter 24 and

The Objectivist Newsletter: Vol. 1 No. 2 -- February, 1962, "Antitrust: The Rule of Unreason"

In them, she mentions and recommends these books:

Mason, Lowell B., The Language of Dissent, New Canaan, Connecticut: The Long House. (Originally published Cleveland, Ohio: The World Publishing Co., 1959.) Reviewed by Ayn Rand in The Objectivist Newsletter: Vol. 2 No. 8 August, 1963

A. D. Neale, The Antitrust Laws of the United States of America: A Study of Competition Enforced by Law, Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1960.

Fleming, Harold, Ten Thousand Commandments: A Story of the Antitrust Laws, New York: Prentice-Hall, 1951. Reviewed in The Objectivist Newsletter: Vol. 1 No. 4 -- April, 1962

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Mason, Lowell B., The Language of Dissent, New Canaan, Connecticut: The Long House. (Originally published Cleveland, Ohio: The World Publishing Co., 1959.) Reviewed by Ayn Rand in The Objectivist Newsletter: Vol. 2 No. 8  August, 1963

Thank you! Now that's something I didn't have on my reading list.

And by the way, I had just read about your accident. I'm very sorry to hear about it - hope you are doing well! I won't tell you to be strong because you already are. :D

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And by the way, I had just read about your accident. I'm very sorry to hear about it - hope you are doing well! I won't tell you to be strong because you already are.  :D

Thank you.

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