Groovenstein

Logic Games

17 posts in this topic

[From the other forum with the first line slightly edited so it makes sense as a new thread.]

I'd like to bring to your attention a fun and mentally engaging game. It's called "Su Doku." My brother introduced me to this game on my vacation, and it's just marvelous. (The timing was convenient, too, as it's great for plane rides.) You can get information at the game at www.sudoku.com. This quote from that page sums up why I think many of you will also find it entertaining:

"You solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic."

I recommend purchasing a book of puzzles from whatever book retail outlet you use. If money's a concern for you as it is for me, fear not. Books can be had for under ten dollars, and it's a lot of entertainment hours.

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[From the other forum with the first line slightly edited so it makes sense as a new thread.]

I'd like to bring to your attention a fun and mentally engaging game.  It's called "Su Doku." ... "You solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic."

I second that; it appeals to me because there is no guessing (and therefore no erasing) involved.

And while I'm posting, I'd like to recommend the two-player game "Stratego" to anyone who is young enough to have missed its heyday. I picked up the vintage set at Target for $20 out of curiosity, and it is very enjoyable. It's like a combination of Memory, Battleship, and chess (although I believe it is older than the first two).

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I would like to recommend the computer game Sherlock - A Game of Logic

It is shareware (try before you buy) and can be downloaded at http://www.kaser.com/sherwin.html

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I'd like to bring to your attention a fun and mentally engaging game.  It's called "Su Doku." 

By the way, I noticed that in the Su Doku book that I have, the author is introduced as a Su Doku "master." Does anyone know if that is a self-proclamation, or an actual title corresponding to some kind of international rating (as with USCF chess ratings, for instance)? My own sixty-second Google search turned up nothing.

-Jared

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Thanks, Groovenstein, for starting this thread and introducing this game. Boston’s free “Metro” newspaper has started to include Su Doku puzzles in their papers. They are fun, challenging, and a great way to spend my daily subway ride to work in the mornings!

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Hey, my pleasure! A site I'm using now is www.websudoku.com, which has four difficulty levels, times you, keeps averages, compares you to other times, and allows you to enter in candidates while you're figuring out what's what.

And now I'd like to thank you for reminding me about the "Metro", and about my commuter rail rides from Southboro to South Station on which I spent hours upon hours calculating poker odds and baseball statistics.

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Hey, my pleasure!  A site I'm using now is www.websudoku.com, which has four difficulty levels, times you, keeps averages, compares you to other times, and allows you to enter in candidates while you're figuring out what's what.

Thanks for the link.

And now I'd like to thank you for reminding me about the "Metro", and about my commuter rail rides from Southboro to South Station on which I spent hours upon hours calculating poker odds and baseball statistics.

Anything for a fellow Husker! :P (Just kidding - I'm not a football fan, but I did grow up near Lincoln and got my BA from UNL).

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:P Yah, you got gipped.

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Good news for all Sudoku fans - the first World Sudoku Championships were recently held in Italy! Now, we've just got to wait for the championships to become a regular event.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4797540.stm

There are some example championship puzzles in the above link as well. Enjoy!

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I have recently discovered kakuro which is something of a hybrid sudoku/crossword. Like sudoku, it's all logic. As of now, I find kakuro much more challenging than sudoku. However it's worth noting that (1) I went right out and bought the toughest kakuro book I could find, and (2) I've done tens of thousands of sudoku puzzles.

Anyway, if you like sudoku, you will probably also like kakuro. Enjoy! Share your tips and success stories here!

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For people who want to use the mental equivalent of anabolic steroids, let me recommend the oriental Game of -Go-. The game was invented in China but it migrated to Japan where it was perfected. The Japanese equivalent of the FIDE (Chess Federation) maintains a system of ranking masters and middling players. To do -Go- right, you need to dedicate your life to it. However achieving even middling status is no trivial matter. Interesting historical note: Admiral Yamamoto, the man who conceived the Pearl Harbor raid was fourth or fifth dan (rank) in Go. He was also a Harvard man. As the old joke goes: You are surprised I speak your ranguage? I was educated in your country are Harvard. The word -Atari- (later the brand name of a home computer) comes from -Go-. It is the equivalent of "check!" in chess.

The remarkable thing as that one can learn the rules in ten minutes (even a kid) but it takes a lifetime to master the game.

See

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_%28board_game%29

Bob Kolker

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The remarkable thing as that one can learn the rules in ten minutes (even a kid) but it takes a lifetime to master the game.

The best games seem to have simple rules but extreme complexity in overall play.

One of my favorite games is Othello, aka Reversi on e.g. the games section at Yahoo. It has very simple rules, but to play a good game is not as easy as it looks.

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For people who want to use the mental equivalent of anabolic steroids, let me recommend the oriental Game of -Go-. The game was invented in China but it migrated to Japan where it was perfected. The Japanese equivalent of the FIDE (Chess Federation) maintains a system of ranking masters and middling players. To do -Go- right, you need to dedicate your life to it. However achieving even middling status is no trivial matter.

The remarkable thing as that one can learn the rules in ten minutes (even a kid) but it takes a lifetime to master the game.

What about the venerable chess?

The pieces have a personality to them, similarly takes a few minutes to learn but a life to master, actively employs military concepts such as "initiative", "tactics", "strategy", strongly appeals to an active mind, and not only exercises the mind and reasoning very well, but adds a great deal of pleasure as well.

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What about the venerable chess?

The pieces have a personality to them, similarly takes a few minutes to learn but a life to master, actively employs military concepts such as "initiative", "tactics", "strategy", strongly appeals to an active mind, and not only exercises the mind and reasoning very well, but adds a great deal of pleasure as well.

-Go- has some advantages over Chess. First, it is more symmetric and homogeneous in its topology. All the interior points of the game are topologically equivalent and all the pieces are alike (except for the color distinction). Only edge and corner points are distinguished in their properties. The only thing that matters is the number of neighboring points. In addition it is easier to handicap in -Go- so a stronger player and a lesser player can meet on almost equal terms. Handicapping in chess usually means giving up a piece like a knight or bishop or being allow extra moves. This destructures the game. The handicapping is therefore much cruder. Also -Go- is combinatorially richer. Even allowing for rotational and reflexives symmetries of the board, there many more games possible in -Go-.

-Go- also differs from Chess in that pieces are not moved about the board. Once a piece is placed it stay unless removed by capture. Thus -Go- is a game of position and envelopment rather than a simulated battle. Also the strategies in -Go- are much more long range than in Chess.

There is a chess like game in Japan, called Shogih. It is considered the lesser game and is played more by youngsters than serious players. It is to -Go- as checkers is to chess (somewhat). Which is not to say it lacks some interesting aspects. -Go- seems to be more congruent with a quiet meditative outlook than an active outlook. Which is why is is not all that popular in the West. -Go- is liked by mathematicians, who play games, because it is symmetric and uniform in its topological structure (except for the special properties of edge and corner positions). Also -Go- is played without a clock so a game can go on for days or weeks. There is a time limit for moves in Chess. It is possible to play "rapid transit" -Go- but that is not a popular mode of play. It goes, somewhat, against the spirit of the game.

I have played -Go-, Chess, Reversi (aka Othello), -Go-Moku- (which is hyped up tic-tac-toe), and Checkers. In my opinion, -Go- is the deepest and most subtle of these games.

Bob Kolker

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