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Photography

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Some new pictures of my dogs. The little girl (pictured left) is growing up! I think I like the B&W more, but I decided to post. I love how happy Eskah's expression is (he's the male, on the right).

I like the B&W better too because the grass is so bright in the color picture that it detracts from the dogs who become the central focus in the B&W.

What breed of dog are they? They have such intelligent faces and look so happy! Are they smart? Playful?

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Thanks Betsy! They are Alaskan Malamutes. This post also has some pictures and some more info, if you haven't seen it.

They are incredibly smart, probably the smartest breed with the most unique personalities I've encountered. In general, they are a little more aloof than playful, though they can be a ton of fun when they're in the right mood. A typical "play fetch" scenario goes some thing like this:

1st time - Dog: "I guess Zak lost his ball. I'll be nice and go get it for him!"

2nd time - Dog: "Hmm...he lost his ball again...I guess I can go get it..."

3rd time Dog: "Get your own stupid ball." *lays down*

But they are really loving when they're in the right mood, which is just about perfect for my personality. I can't stand dogs (or people) who need constant attention.

Another picture, showing their size (relative to my 5'11" frame). The female has grown considerably since the picture was taken.

dscn2222x.jpg

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Beautiful dogs. Sounds like a pleasant breed, indeed. What does big boy over there weigh?

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He was around 165 lb, but has dropped to a healthier 150-155. He has much more energy and pep at his lower weight, but he sometimes growls at his food bowl in protest.

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Lovely dogs! They look cute, fluffy, happy and clever. :)

Lately i've been keeping myself busy with learning photography. It's about time I learned a little more about it and there are many views worth capturing in the summer around where I live. Anyway, thought i'd show you a couple of shots...

The first is one of those where I just got a little lucky. Thought i'd try some different settings on the camera, so went out in the garden to just find something to shoot. So there's pretty flower and I start shooting, when I see this little bug crawling around in there. While crawling around and trying to get a closer shot this other little bug joins the show. This is about when the proper composition for the shot started to become obvious.

Now, one might think that the hardest part is communicating and directing the bugs. Them having tiny little brains with a poor capacity for language. That, however, was the least of my problems.

I was using a 60mm macro lens for this. Macro lenses with short focal lengths mean that you have to get really close to the subject. This meant getting into a very uncomfortable position while trying to hold the camera steady. It also means it's easy to block the light and that you get a very shallow depth of field. The shallow depth of field in turn means you have to be really precise with the focus. I had to be very steady while still being fast enough to not let a gust of wind ruin it, and on top of that have the little bugs perform.

This is the only one out of around 300 shots that worked. And, I really like it. Not because I got lucky with a difficult shot, but because there seems to be a story going on and the composition really worked.

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Bugs

In the second one I could not decide which way to take. I kept going back and forth between the black and white and color. In the colored one I really liked the golden hues, and in the black and white I liked the silver toning. Then some photographer said that it's almost impossible to have black and white and colored shots next to each other, without them discrediting each other. Well, challenge accepted! I think this arrangement works. What do you think?

5764423050_033061b88f_m.jpg

Gold & Silver

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Thanks!

It was taken around 6 AM. A little earlier would probably have given better light, but i'm not sure it would have reached those places.

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Speaking of time of day, I like how this day-to-night conversion turned out. It was shot around noon. A pretty dull and overcast day so it was fairly good for this type of thing.

5765709358_9482cf2e9a_m.jpg

Lilacs

This one was taken at the same location as the G&S(which is about a 5 minute walk from where I live).

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Shoreline

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That first one of the flower and bugs you posted is really awesome. I'm thinking about learning a little about photography this summer, so it's cool to see what you've done.

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Thanks! I've recieved alot of positive feedback on that one. At first I was a bit lukewarm towards it. Maybe because I haven't spent days editing. But it just keeps growing on me. Only thing i'd like to change is the depth of field which is just a little bit too shallow, but it's not really something that bothers me.

I've found that learning photography is much more fun than I had expected, so I think it's going to be time well spent. It would be fun to see what you come up with. :)

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Thanks MRZ!

I read your post before logging in. Imagine my surprise when I was expecting a human baby and the first thing I noticed was your chin. :)

The cat looks really cute though. What breed is it?

---

I often pass this garden on my walks around the lovely beach promenade here. I love the colors and I think the fence makes for an interesting composition(aside from it's colors, also, I like that it doesn't lead you into the picture, but instead just gives you a glimpse of someones private and highly valued property).

5809516652_190883bbd1_m.jpg

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Thanks MRZ!

I read your post before logging in. Imagine my surprise when I was expecting a human baby and the first thing I noticed was your chin. :)

The cat looks really cute though. What breed is it?

ROFL! I think I just scared myself logging in to check your post :D I'd forgotten about my stubbly chin being in the picture. His name's Juju (after Mama Odie's adorable snake from The Princess and The Frog) and he's just a random cat we found in our backyard when he was like 10 days old. My wife thought his pattern was really interesting so we kept him although we spent a couple of months feeding him milk through a syringe and stimulating his behind with a napkin to make him pee/poop, which was a new experience for both of us and kind of fun.

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Aaaaawwwww!

Another picture, showing their size (relative to my 5'11" frame). The female has grown considerably since the picture was taken.

dscn2222x.jpg

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Some recent Kira pix:

With Daddy at the playground last week:

IMG_20110521_123517.jpg

Hunting a birdie in the park a couple of days ago:

IMG_20110615_115305.jpg

Fun and learning with a stick:

IMG_20110615_121043.jpg

IMG_20110615_121102.jpg

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Adorable, Piz!!

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Some recent Kira pix:

She looks so curious and so purposefully active.

She is. I don't know another child who can be so intent on what she's doing. When she's not laughing out of pure joy in her existence. Sure, she has tantrums now and again, but so very much of the time she just loves being alive. Right this moment she's giggling her head off, because spinning around and around makes you feel funny and fall down. And "explaining" it to us. :)

My older boy was like that. At the age of 5 he was teaching other visitors every dinosaur, and which were herbivores and carnivores (using those words), at the Philadelphia Museum of Natural History.

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